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Bichitra Natak
Bachittar Natak
Bachittar Natak
(or Bachitar/Bichittar) (ਬਚਿੱਤਰ ਨਾਟਕ, literally Resplendent Drama) is from Dasam Granth, ang (page) 94 to ang 175 of the 2326 ang. It is generally attributed to the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. Although the word "Natak" means "drama" in Punjabi, this is no drama. The Guru has outlined the circumstance and history of the time and how great courage and strength was required to overcome the many hurdles that were upon the community. It starts with a praise of the Akal Purukh. It then gives a genealogy starting from King Surya, King Raghu, King Aja, King Dasrath to Lord Rama
Rama
and his two sons Lav and Kush. It gives the author's own biography and includes the Battle of Nadaun, Husaini battle and the arrival of prince Muazzam in the Punjab
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Dasam Granth
The Dasam Padishah ke Granth, commonly known as Dasam Granth
Dasam Granth
(Gurmukhi script: ਦਸਮ ਪਾਤਿਸ਼ਾਹ ਕੇ ਗ੍ਰੰਥ ਸਾਹਿਬ,ਦਸਮ ਗਰੰਥ ਸਾਹਿਬ), is a religious text containing many of the texts traditionally attributed to Guru Gobind Singh
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Akal Purakh
Akal Purakh is a Sikh
Sikh
name used for God. Literally it means "a timeless being who never dies." The first word Akal, literally timeless, immortal, non-temporal, is a term integral to Sikh
Sikh
tradition and philosophy. It is extensively used in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib and Dasam Granth
Dasam Granth
hymns by Guru Gobind Singh, who titled one of his poetic compositions Akal Ustat, i.e. "In Praise (ustati) of the Timeless One (akal)". However, the concept of Akal is not peculiar to the Dasam Granth
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Braj Bhasha
Braj
Braj
Bhāshā is a Western Hindi
Hindi
language. Along with Awadhi (a variety of Eastern Hindi), it was one of the two predominant literary languages of North-Central India
India
before the switch to Khariboli
Khariboli
in the 19th century. Brij Bhasha is spoken by people in the nebulously defined region of Vraja Bhoomi, which was a political state in the era of the Mahabharata
Mahabharata
wars. According to ancient Hindu
Hindu
texts such as the Bhagavata Purana, the Kingdom of Surasena
Surasena
is described as spreading through the Brij (also known as Vrija or Vraja), where the incarnation of Vishnu, Krishna
Krishna
was born and spent his childhood days. This region lies in the Agra-Mathura- Aligarh
Aligarh
area, and stretches as far as the environs of Delhi
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Apabhramsha
Apabhranśa (Sanskrit: अपभ्रंश, IPA: [əpəbʱrən'ʃə], Prakrit: Avahansa) is a term used by vyākaraṇin (grammarians) since Patañjali to refer to the dialects prevalent in the Ganges (east and west) before the rise of the modern languages. In Indology, it is used as an umbrella term for the dialects forming the transition[1] between the late Middle and the early Modern Indo-Aryan languages, spanning the period between the 6th and 13th centuries CE
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Chanakya
Chanakya
Chanakya
(IAST: Cāṇakya,  pronunciation (help·info); fl. c. 4th century BCE[1]) was an Indian teacher, philosopher, economist, jurist and royal advisor. He is traditionally identified as Kauṭilya or Vishnugupta, who authored the ancient Indian political treatise, the Arthashastra.[2] As such, he is considered the pioneer of the field of political science and economics in India, and his work is thought of as an important precursor to classical economics.[3][4][5][6] His works were lost near the end of the Gupta Empire and not rediscovered until the early twentieth century.[4] Chanakya
Chanakya
assisted the first Mauryan emperor Chandragupta in his rise to power. He is widely credited for having played an important role in the establishment of the Maurya Empire
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Chhibber
Chhibber (alternatively Chibber or Chhiber) is a Mohyal Brahmin
Brahmin
clan from the Sindh
Sindh
and Punjab. They are one of the seven clans of the Mohyals of the Punjab. The other six clans are Bali, Bhimwal, Datt/Dutt, Lau, Mohan and Vaid. Punjabi Brahmins
Brahmins
other than Mohyals include Barahis (Twelvers) and Athwans (Eighters). Most Chhibbers are Hindus, but because they were closely associated with the Sikh Gurus, especially the ninth and tenth Gurus, Guru Teg Bahadur
Guru Teg Bahadur
and Guru Gobind Singh, many follow Sikhism
Sikhism
as well
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Sikhism
Sikhism
Sikhism
(/ˈsiːkɪzəm/; Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi[3] Sikkhī, pronounced [ˈsɪkːʰiː], from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a religion that originated in the Punjab region
Punjab region

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Guru Granth Sahib
Guru Granth Sahib
Guru Granth Sahib
(Punjabi (Gurmukhi)eg.ਓ : (Gurū Gra°th Sāhib Jī), Punjabi pronunciation: [ɡʊɾu ɡɾəntʰ sɑhɪb], /ˈɡʊəruː ɡrʌnt səˈhɪb/) is the religious scripture of Sikhism, regarded by Sikhs as the final, sovereign, and eternal living Guru following the lineage of the ten human Gurus of the Sikh religion.[1] Adi Granth, the first rendition, was compiled by the fifth Sikh
Sikh
Guru, Guru Arjan
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Sodhi
Sodhi is a caste from the Punjab
Punjab
region, a subdivision of the Khatri caste.[1] Seven of the Sikh
Sikh
Gurus, from Guru Ram Das
Guru Ram Das
on, were Sodhis.[2] In the Bachittar Natak, attributed to Guru Gobind Singh, Sodhis are described as linear descendants of Lava, one of the twin sons of Sita and Rama. According to the legend, some of the descendants migrated to Sanaudh, where the clan chieftain married the daughter of the king and had a son Sodhi, whose descendants ruled over the Sanaudh country.[1] At the time of the Sikh
Sikh
Empire, Maharaja Ranjit Singh
Ranjit Singh
awarded the Sodhis grants of jagirs worth 500,000 rupees a year
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Punjabi Language
Punjabi (/pʌnˈdʒɑːbi/;[6] Gurmukhi: ਪੰਜਾਬੀ pañjābī; Shahmukhi: پنجابی‬ paṉjābī)[7] is an Indo-Aryan language
Indo-Aryan language
spoken by over 100 million native speakers worldwide, ranking as the 10th most widely spoken language (2015)[8][9] in the world. It is the native language of the Punjabi people, who associate with the historical Punjab region
Punjab region
of India
India
and Pakistan. Among Indo-European languages, it is unusual due to the use of lexical tone.[10][11][12] Punjabi is the most widely spoken language in Pakistan,[13] the 11th most widely spoken in India, and the third most-spoken native language in the Indian Subcontinent. Punjabi is the fifth most-spoken native language (after English, French, Mandarin and Cantonese) in Canada
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Guru Nanak
Guru
Guru
Nanak ([ˈɡʊɾu ˈnɑnək],  pronunciation, IAST: Gurū Nānak) (15 April 1469 – 22 September 1539) was the founder of Sikhism
Sikhism
and the first of the ten Sikh
Sikh
Gurus
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Tapa (India)
Tapas is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "to heat".[2] It also connotes certain spiritual practices in Indian religions
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Hemkunt
Hemkund
Hemkund
Sahib (also spelled Hemkunt), formally known as Gurudwara
Gurudwara
Sri Hemkund
Hemkund
Sahib Ji, is a Sikh
Sikh
place of worship and pilgrimage site in Chamoli district, Uttarakhand, India. It is devoted to Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), the tenth Sikh
Sikh
Guru, and finds mention in Dasam Granth, a work dictated by Guruji himself. With its setting of a glacial lake surrounded by seven mountain peaks, each adorned by a Nishan Sahib
Nishan Sahib
on its cliff, it is according to the Survey of India located in the Himalayas
Himalayas
at an elevation of 4,632 meters (15,197 feet).[1] It is approached from Gobindghat
Gobindghat
on the Rishikesh-Badrinath highway
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Madra
Madra
Madra
(IAST: Mādra; [mɑːd̪rə]) is the name of an ancient region and its inhabitants, located in the north-west division of the ancient Indian sub-continent. The Madra
Madra
Kingdom's capital is believed to have been ancient Sialkot, in modern-day Pakistan.[1] The kingdom's boundaries are believed to have inhabited is thought to have extended from portions of the Hindu Kush (possibly as far as North Eastern Iran) to the present day Punjab
Punjab
and Haryana
Haryana
province of India
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Sikh Gurus
The Sikh
Sikh
gurus, referred to as the strong and powerful, are credited with establishing Sikhism, which started as a minor religion, but developed into a prominent religion over centuries. Guru Nanak
Guru Nanak
was the first of the recognized Sikh
Sikh
gurus. There were ten recognized living gurus in the Nanak line. All 10 Sikh
Sikh
gurus were born into the Jat caste and sub castes (such as Bedi, Trehan, Bhalla and Sodhi gotras).[1][2][3] Modern Sikhism
Sikhism
believes the Adi Granth
Adi Granth
or Granth Sahib, the writings of the gurus, to now be the guru. This belief has been integrated alongside the writings of Sikh
Sikh
gurus, and is now called Guru Granth Sahib
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