HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bicameralism
A bicameral legislature divides the legislators into two separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. Bicameralism
Bicameralism
is distinguished from unicameralism, in which all members deliberate and vote as a single group, and from some legislatures that have three or more separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. As of 2015, fewer than half the world's national legislatures are bicameral.[1] Often, the members of the two chambers are elected or selected by different methods, which vary from country to country. This can often lead to the two chambers having very different compositions of members. Enactment of primary legislation often requires a concurrent majority – the approval of a majority of members in each of the chambers of the legislature. When this is the case, the legislature may be called an example of perfect bicameralism
[...More...]

"Bicameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mother Of Parliaments
"The mother of parliaments" is an expression coined by the British politician and reformer John Bright
John Bright
in a speech at Birmingham
Birmingham
on 18 January 1865. It was a reference to England. His actual words were: " England
England
is the mother of parliaments". This was reported in The Times
The Times
on the following day.[1] The expression is often applied to the Parliament
Parliament
of the United Kingdom because of the adoption of the Westminster model of parliamentary democracy by many countries of the former British Empire.[2][3][4] See also[edit]History of democracy History of parliamentarism Parliament Parliament
Parliament
in the Making Parliamentary system Prime minister Parliamentary sovereignty The History of ParliamentReferences[edit]^ Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, revised 4th ed, 1996, p. 141 ^ Parliament. CUP Archive
[...More...]

"Mother Of Parliaments" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient India
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to ancient India: Ancient India
India
India
India
as it existed from pre-historic times to the start of Medieval India, which is typically dated (when the term is still used) to the end of the Gupta Empire.[1]Contents1 Geography of ancient India 2 General history of ancient India2.1 Periodisation of Indian history 2.2 Indian pre-history 2.3 Iron Age (c. 1200 – 272 BCE) 2.4 Second Urbanisation 2.5 Classical Age 2.6 Middle Ages (c
[...More...]

"Ancient India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Deliberative Assembly
A deliberative assembly is a gathering of members (of any kind of collective) who use parliamentary procedure to make decisions.Contents1 Etymology 2 Characteristics 3 Rights of members 4 Types4.1 Mass meeting 4.2 Local assembly of an organized society 4.3 Convention 4.4 Legislative body 4.5 Board5 Committees 6 See also 7 Notes 8 BibliographyEtymology[edit] In a speech to the electorate at Bristol in 1774, Edmund Burke described the British Parliament as a "deliberative assembly," and the expression became the basic term for a body of persons meeting to discuss and determine common action.[1][2] Characteristics[edit] Robert's Rules of Order

[...More...]

"Deliberative Assembly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Enactment Of A Bill
A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature.[1] A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature, or a statute.Contents1 Usage 2 Preparation 3 Introduction 4 Legislative stages 5 Enactment and after5.1 Approval 5.2 Afterwards6 Numbering of bills 7 See also 8 References 9 External links9.1 Hong Kong 9.2 India 9.3 Ireland 9.4 New Zealand 9.5 United Kingdom 9.6 United StatesUsage[edit] The term bill is primarily used in Anglophone nations
[...More...]

"Enactment Of A Bill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Primary Legislation
In parliamentary systems and presidential systems of government, primary legislation and secondary legislation, the latter also called delegated legislation or subordinate legislation,[1] are two forms of law, created respectively by the legislative and executive branches of government. Primary legislation generally consists of statutes, also known as "acts", that set out broad outlines and principles, but delegate specific authority to an executive branch to make more specific laws under the aegis of the principal act. The executive branch can then issue secondary legislation (mainly via its regulatory agencies), creating legally-enforceable regulations and the procedures for implementing them
[...More...]

"Primary Legislation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seventeenth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Seventeenth Amendment (Amendment XVII) to the United States Constitution established the popular election of United States Senators by the people of the states. The amendment supersedes Article I, §3, Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which senators were elected by state legislatures. It also alters the procedure for filling vacancies in the Senate, allowing for state legislatures to permit their governors to make temporary appointments until a special election can be held. The amendment was proposed by the 62nd Congress in 1912 and adopted in 1913 upon being ratified by three-fourths (36) of the state legislatures
[...More...]

"Seventeenth Amendment To The United States Constitution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Responsible Government
Responsible government
Responsible government
is a conception of a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability, the foundation of the Westminster system
Westminster system
of parliamentary democracy.[citation needed] Governments (the equivalent of the executive branch) in Westminster democracies are responsible to parliament rather than to the monarch, or, in a colonial context, to the imperial government, and in a republican context, to the president, either in full or in part. If the parliament is bicameral, then the government is responsible first to the parliament's lower house, which is more representative than the upper house, as it has more members and they are always directly elected. Responsible government
Responsible government
of parliamentary accountability manifests itself in several ways
[...More...]

"Responsible Government" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Madison
James Madison
James Madison
Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836)[2] was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1809 to 1817. He is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
and the Bill of Rights. Born into a prominent Virginia
Virginia
planting family, Madison served as a member of the Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates and the Continental Congress during and after the American Revolutionary War
[...More...]

"James Madison" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sumer
Sumer
Sumer
(/ˈsuːmər/)[note 1] is the earliest known civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq, during the Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
and Early Bronze
Bronze
ages, and arguably the first civilization in the world with Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and the Indus Valley.[1] Living along the valleys of the Tigris
Tigris
and Euphrates, Sumerian farmers were able to grow an abundance of grain and other crops, the surplus of which enabled them to settle in one place. Proto-writing
Proto-writing
in the prehistory dates back to c. 3000 BC
[...More...]

"Sumer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
[...More...]

"Ancient Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Founding Fathers Of The United States
The Founding Fathers of the United States
United States
were descendants of immigrants settled in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
in North America
North America
who led the American Revolution
American Revolution
against the Kingdom of Great Britain. Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as the key Founding Fathers: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.[2][3] Adams, Jefferson, and Franklin were members of the Committee of Five
Committee of Five
that drafted the Declaration of Independence. Hamilton, Madison, and Jay were authors of The Federalist Papers, advocating ratification of the Constitution
[...More...]

"Founding Fathers Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
[...More...]

"Ancient Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medieval Europe
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Medieval Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estates Of The Realm
The estates of the realm, or three estates, were the broad orders of social hierarchy used in Christendom
Christendom
(Christian Europe) from the medieval period to early modern Europe. Different systems for dividing society members into estates developed and evolved over time. The best known system is the French Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
(Old Regime), a three-estate system used until the French Revolution
French Revolution
(1789–1799). Monarchy
Monarchy
was for the king and the queen and this system was made up of clergy (the First Estate), nobles (the Second Estate), and peasants and bourgeoisie (the Third Estate)
[...More...]

"Estates Of The Realm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revolution 11 December 1688 
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.