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Biblioteca Laurentiana
The Laurentian Library
Laurentian Library
(Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana) is a historic library in Florence, Italy, containing more than 11,000 manuscripts and 4,500 early printed books.[1] Built in a cloister of the Medicean Basilica di San Lorenzo di Firenze
Basilica di San Lorenzo di Firenze
under the patronage of the Medici pope Clement VII, the library was built to emphasize that the Medici were no longer merchants but members of intelligent and ecclesiastical society. It contains the manuscripts and books belonging to the private library of the Medici
Medici
family
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Minuscule 458
Minuscule 458
Minuscule 458
(in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 160 (in the Soden numbering),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment
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Codex Amiatinus
A codex (/ˈkoʊdɛks/) (from the Latin
Latin
caudex for "trunk of a tree" or block of wood, book), plural codices (/ˈkɒdɪsiːz/), is a book constructed of a number of sheets of paper, vellum, papyrus, or similar materials. The term is now usually only used of manuscript books, with hand-written contents,[1] but describes the format that is now near-universal for printed books in the Western world. The book is usually bound by stacking the pages and fixing one edge, and using a cover thicker than the sheets. Some codices are continuously folded like a concertina. The alternative to paged codex format for a long document is the continuous scroll. Examples of folded codices include the Maya codices. Sometimes people use the term for a book-style format, including modern printed books but excluding folded books. The Romans developed the form from wooden writing tablets
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Vulgate
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Vulgate
Vulgate
(/ˈvʌlɡeɪt, -ɡət/) is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible
Bible
that became the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin
Latin
version of the Bible
Bible
during the 16th century. The translation was largely the work of St Jerome, who in 382 had been commissioned by Pope Damasus I
Pope Damasus I
to revise the Vetus Latina
Vetus Latina
("Old Latin") Gospels
Gospels
then in use by the Roman Church
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Squarcialupi Codex
The Squarcialupi Codex (Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Med. Pal. 87) is an illuminated manuscript compiled in Florence, Italy
Italy
in the early 15th century. It is the single largest primary source of music of the 14th-century Italian Trecento
Trecento
(also known as the "Italian ars nova"). It consists of 216 parchment folios, organized by composer, with each composer's section beginning with a portrait of the composer richly illuminated in gold, red, blue and purple. The manuscript is in good condition, and musical pieces are complete. Included in the codex are 146 complete pieces by Francesco Landini, 37 by Bartolino da Padova, 36 by Niccolò da Perugia, 29 by Andrea da Firenze, 28 by Jacopo da Bologna, 17 by Lorenzo da Firenze, 16 by Gherardello da Firenze, 15 by Donato da Cascia, 12 pieces by Giovanni da Cascia, 6 by Vincenzo da Rimini, and smaller amounts of music by others
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Erinna
Erinna
Erinna
(/ɪˈrɪnə/; Greek: Ἤριννα) was an ancient Greek poet. Biographical details about her life are uncertain. She is generally thought to have lived in the first half of the fourth century BC, though some ancient traditions have her as a contemporary of Sappho; Telos is generally considered to be her most likely birthplace, but Tenos, Teos, Rhodes, and Lesbos
Lesbos
are all also mentioned by ancient sources as her home. Erinna
Erinna
is best known for her long poem, the Distaff, a three-hundred line hexameter lament for her childhood friend Baucis, who had died shortly after marriage. A large fragment of this poem was discovered in 1928 at Behnasa in Egypt
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Sappho
Sappho
Sappho
(/ˈsæfoʊ/; Aeolic Greek
Aeolic Greek
Ψάπφω, Psappho [psápːʰɔː]; c. 630 – c. 570 BC) was an archaic Greek poet from the island of Lesbos.[a] Sappho
Sappho
is known for her lyric poetry, written to be sung and accompanied by a lyre.[2] Most of Sappho's poetry is now lost, and what is extant has survived only in fragmentary form, except for one complete poem – the "Ode to Aphrodite". As well as lyric poetry, ancient commentators claimed that Sappho
Sappho
wrote elegiac and iambic poetry. Three epigrams attributed to Sappho
Sappho
are extant, but these are actually Hellenistic
Hellenistic
imitations of Sappho's style. Little is known of Sappho's life. She was from a wealthy family from Lesbos, though the names of both of her parents are uncertain
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Papyrus 35
Papyrus
Papyrus
35 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by P displaystyle mathfrak P 35, is an early copy of the New Testament
New Testament
in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Gospel of Matthew, it contains only Matthew 25:12-15.20-23. The manuscript paleographically has been assigned to the 3rd or 4th century.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingDescription[edit] The Greek text of this codex is a representative of the Alexandrian text-type. Aland placed it in Category I.[1] Aland dated the manuscript to the 4th century, Roberts and T. C
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Papyrus 36
Papyrus
Papyrus
36 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by siglum P displaystyle mathfrak P 36, is a copy of the New Testament
New Testament
in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Gospel of John, it contains only John 3:14-18.31-32.34-35. The manuscript palaeographically has been assigned to the 6th century.[1] The Greek text of this codex is an eclectic. Aland placed it in Category III.[1] The manuscript was examined by Pistelli, Carlini, and Horseley. It is currently housed at the Laurentian Library
Laurentian Library
(PSI 3) in Florence.[1][2] See also[edit]Bible portalList of New Testament
New Testament
papyri Papyrus
Papyrus
35References[edit]^ a b c Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995)
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Papyrus 89
Papyrus
Papyrus
89 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by P displaystyle mathfrak P 89, is an early copy of the New Testament
New Testament
in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Epistle to the Hebrews. The surviving texts of Hebrews are verses 6:7–9,15–17. The manuscript palaeographically has been assigned to the 4th century.TextThe Greek text of this codex is too brief for classification. Aland did not place it in any Category of New Testament
New Testament
manuscripts.[1]LocationIt is currently housed at the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana (PL III/292) in Florence.[1][2] See also[edit]Bible portalList of New Testament
New Testament
papyriReferences[edit]^ a b Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism
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Uncial 0171
Matthew 10:17-23,25-32; Luke 22:44-50,52-56,61,63-64Date c. 300Script GreekFound Hermopolis
Hermopolis
Magna, EgyptNow at Medici Library Berlin State MuseumsCitePapiri greci e latini della Società Italiana, (Florence, 1912—), 1:2-4; 2:22-25Size2 vellum leaves; 5.7 x 9.2 cm; 2 columns, 23 lines/pageType WesternCategory IVHand reformed documentaryNote witness to Western text in Egypt Uncial 0171
Uncial 0171
(in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 07 (Soden) are two vellum leaves of a late third century (or beginning of fourth) Greek uncial Bible
Bible
codex containing fragments of the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
and the Gospel of Luke
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Uncial 0174
Uncial
Uncial
0174 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 5th century.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains a very small part of the Epistle to the Galatians 2:5-6, on fragment of one parchment leaf (6 cm by 2.3 cm). The text is written in one column per page, 6 lines per page, in uncial letters. Verso side of a fragment is blank.[1] Currently it is dated by the INTF
INTF
to the 5th century.[1][2] The Greek text of this codex is unknown. Text is too brief to classify. Aland did not placed it in any of Categories of New Testament manuscripts.[1] It was written in Egypt
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Minuscule 619
Minuscule 619 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 57 (von Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. It is dated by a colophon to the 984.[2] The manuscript has complex contents. Tischendorf labelled it by 148a and 184p.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Text 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains the text of the Acts of the Apostles, Pauline epistles on 342 parchment leaves (size 33.5 cm by 24 cm).[2] The text is written in one column per page, 15 lines per page for the biblical text, 46 lines per page for a commentary.[4] It contains Prolegomena, numbers of the κεφαλαια (chapters) at the margin, the τιτλοι (titles) at the top, and a commentary.[3][4] The order of books: Acts of the Apostles, Catholic epistles, and Pauline epistles
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Florentine Codex
The Florentine Codex
Codex
is a 16th-century ethnographic research study in Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
by the Spanish Franciscan friar
Franciscan friar
Bernardino de Sahagún. Sahagún originally titled it: La Historia Universal de las Cosas de Nueva España (in English: The Universal History of the Things of New Spain).[1] After a translation mistake, it was given the name Historia general de las Cosas de Nueva España. The best-preserved manuscript is commonly referred to as the Florentine Codex, as the codex is held in the Laurentian Library
Laurentian Library
of Florence, Italy. In partnership with Nahua men who were formerly his students at the Colegio de Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco, Sahagún conducted research, organized evidence, wrote and edited his findings. He worked on this project from 1545 up until his death in 1590
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Minuscule 836 (Gregory-Aland)
Minuscule 836 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), Θε46 (von Soden),[1][2] is a 14th-century Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament on paper
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