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Bernie Taupin
Bernard John Taupin
Taupin
(born 22 May 1950) is an English lyricist, poet, and singer, best known for his long-term collaboration with Elton John, writing the lyrics for the majority of the star's songs. In 1967, Taupin
Taupin
answered an advertisement placed in the UK music paper New Musical Express
New Musical Express
by Liberty Records, a company that was seeking new songwriters.[1] Around the same time, Elton John
Elton John
responded to the same advertisement, and the duo were brought together, collaborating on many projects since.[1][2] In 1971, journalist Penny Valentine wrote that "Bernie Taupin's lyrics were to become as important as Elton [John] himself, proved to have a mercurial brilliance
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Tribeca Film Festival
The Tribeca
Tribeca
Film Festival is a prominent film festival held in the Tribeca
Tribeca
neighborhood of Manhattan, showcasing a diverse selection of independent films. Since its inaugural year in 2002, it has become a recognized outlet for independent filmmakers in all genres to release their work to a broad audience. In 2006 and 2007, the Festival received over 8,600 film submissions and held 1,500 screenings.[1] The Festival's program line-up includes a variety of independent films including documentaries, narrative features and shorts, as well as a program of family-friendly films. The Festival also features panel discussions with personalities in the entertainment world and a music lounge produced with ASCAP to showcase artists
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Anwick
Anwick is a small village and civil parish in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 394.[1] The village is situated 4 miles (6 km) north-east from Sleaford, on the A153 between Sleaford and Billinghay, and 16 miles (26 km) south-east from the city and county town of Lincoln.Contents1 History1.1 RAF Anwick2 Landmarks 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Anwick is mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book as "Amuinc" and "Haniwic". The manor was in the Hundred of Flaxwell in Kesteven, and comprised 29 households with 5 villagers 3 smallholders and 21 freemen, and 6 ploughlands. In 1066 Lord of the Manor was Toki son of Auti; in 1086 lordship was transferred to Ralph, nephew of Geoffrey Alselin, and Drogo of la Beuvrière
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B-side
The terms A-side and B-side
A-side and B-side
refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 33 1/3 rpm phonograph records, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records. The A-side usually featured the recording that the artist, record producer, or the record company intended to receive the initial promotional effort and then receive radio airplay, hopefully, to become a "hit" record. The B-side (or "flip-side") is a secondary recording that has a history of its own: some artists released B-sides that were considered as strong as the A-side and became hits in their own right
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Tom Robinson
Thomas Giles "Tom" Robinson (born 1 June 1950) is a British singer-songwriter, bassist, radio presenter and long-time LGBT rights activist, best known for the hits "Glad to Be Gay", "2-4-6-8 Motorway", and "Don't Take No for an Answer", with his Tom Robinson Band. He later peaked at No. 6 in the UK Singles Chart
UK Singles Chart
with his solo single "War Baby".[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Activism 4 In popular culture 5 Discography5.1 Albums 5.2 Singles6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Tom Robinson
Tom Robinson
was born into a middle-class family in Cambridge
Cambridge
on 1 June 1950.[2] He attended Friends' School, Saffron Walden, a co-ed privately funded Quaker school, between 1961 and 1967. He played guitar in a trio at school called ‘The Inquisition’
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Gary Osborne
Gary Osborne (born in London) is an English singer and songwriter from the United Kingdom. He chairs The Songwriters Executive of the British Academy Of Songwriters Composers and Authors and is also chairman of The Ivor Novello Awards. Career[edit] Born in London
London
in 1949, Osborne is the son of the late musical director Tony Osborne.[1] He was educated in Switzerland and entered the music industry at the age of 15. As a teenage songwriter Osborne had recordings by the likes of Timi Yuro, Nana Mouskouri
Nana Mouskouri
and Val Doonican
Val Doonican
and at age 17 had his first US chart entry with "On The Other Side" by The Seekers, which he wrote with Tom Springfield. Osborne's early career included presenting the 1960s radio show Cool Britania on the BBC World Service
BBC World Service
and a stint with RCA Records
RCA Records
in its A&R department
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A&R
Artists and repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label or music publishing company that is responsible for talent scouting and overseeing the artistic development of recording artists and songwriters.[1] It also acts as a liaison between artists and the record label or publishing company; every activity involving artists to the point of album release is generally considered under the purview, and responsibility, of A&R.Contents1 Responsibilities1.1 Finding talent 1.2 Overseeing the recording process 1.3 Assisting with marketing and promotion2 History and influence 3 Regional variations 4 Recent changes 5 See also 6 Citations 7 ReferencesResponsibilities[edit] Finding talent[edit] The A&R division of a record label is responsible for finding new recording artists and bringing those art
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Liberty Records
Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. It was started by chairman Simon Waronker in 1955 with Al Bennett as president and Theodore Keep as chief engineer. It was reactivated in 2001 in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and had two previous revivals.Contents1 History1.1 1950s 1.2 1960s and 1970s 1.3 1980s and 1990s 1.4 Liberty Records in the 2000s in the United Kingdom 1.5 Current ownership2 Liberty Records artists 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] 1950s[edit] Liberty's early releases focused on film and orchestral music. Its first single was Lionel Newman's "The Girl Upstairs."[1][2] Its first big hit, in 1955, was by Julie London
Julie London
singing her version of the torch song, "Cry Me a River", which climbed to No. 9 in the Billboard Hot 100.[3] It helped Liberty sell her first album, Julie Is Her Name
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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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Snooker
Snooker
Snooker
(UK: /ˈsnuːkər/, US: /ˈsnʊkər/)[2][3] is a cue sport which originated among British Army
British Army
officers in Etawah, India
India
in the later half of the 19th century. It is played on a rectangular table covered with a green cloth, or baize, with pockets at each of the four corners and in the middle of each long side. Using a cue and 22 coloured balls, players must strike the white ball (or "cue ball") to pot the remaining balls in the correct sequence, accumulating points for each pot. An individual game, or frame, is won by the player who scores the most points. A match is won when a player wins a predetermined number of frames. In the 1870s, billiards was a popular sport played by members of the British Army
British Army
stationed in India
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Grammar School
A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools. The original purpose of medieval grammar schools was the teaching of Latin. Over time the curriculum was broadened, first to include Ancient Greek, and later English and other European languages, natural sciences, mathematics, history, geography, and other subjects. In the late Victorian era
Victorian era
grammar schools were reorganised to provide secondary education throughout England and Wales; Scotland had developed a different system
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Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
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Market Rasen
Market Rasen
Market Rasen
is a town and civil parish within the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. The River Rase
River Rase
runs through it east to west, approximately 13 miles (21 km) north-east from Lincoln, 18 miles (29 km) east from Gainsborough and 16 miles (26 km) south-west from Grimsby. The town is known for Market Rasen Racecourse, being close to the epicentre of an earthquake & for being one of the chosen Portas Pilot towns. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 3,904.[1]Contents1 Community 2 Education 3 February 2008 earthquake 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCommunity[edit] Market Rasen
Market Rasen
is a small market town on the edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds
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Dijon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Dijon
Dijon
(French pronunciation: [diʒɔ̃] ( listen))[a] is a city in eastern France, capital of the Côte-d'Or
Côte-d'Or
département and of the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
region.[1] The earliest archaeological finds within the city limits of Dijon
Dijon
date to the Neolithic
Neolithic
period. Dijon
Dijon
later became a Roman settlement named Divio, located on the road from Lyon
Lyon
to Paris
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London Underground
The London Underground
London Underground
(also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving London and some parts of the adjacent counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex
Essex
and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
in the United Kingdom.[6] The Underground has its origins in the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground railway. Opened in 1863, it is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line.[7] The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2016–17 carried 1.379 billion passengers,[3] making it the world's 11th busiest metro system
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Penny Valentine
Penelope Ann "Penny" Valentine (13 February 1943 – 9 January 2003) was a British music journalist, rock critic, and occasional television personality.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Penny Valentine was born in London, of Jewish and Italian ancestry. In 1959 she became a trainee reporter, first on the Uxbridge Post, and in the early 1960s on Boyfriend, a weekly magazine for teen girls. In 1964, she joined the staff of Disc, a weekly pop music magazine (later Disc and Music Echo), as a journalist and record reviewer, becoming for a time Britain's most influential reviewer of new pop singles.[1] According to fellow journalist Richard Williams, "She was probably the first woman to write about pop music as though it really mattered."[1] She loved soul music, and supported singers such as Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye before they became famous
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