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Bernhard Studer
Bernhard Studer
Bernhard Studer
(August 21, 1794 – May 2, 1887), Swiss geologist, was born at Büren, near Bern. Biography[edit] He was educated to become a clergyman, but his interests later switched to sciences. In 1815 he became a teacher of mathematics at the gymnasium in Bern, and during the following year, began studying geology at University of Göttingen
University of Göttingen
as a pupil of Johann Friedrich Ludwig Hausmann. He subsequently furthered his education at Freiburg, Berlin
Berlin
and Paris.[2] In 1825 he published his first major work, Beyträge zu einer Monographie der Molasse. Later on, he commenced his detailed investigations of the western Alps, and published in 1834 his Geologie der westlichen Schweizer-Alpen. In the same year, largely through his influence, the University of Bern
Bern
was established and he became the first professor of geology
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Jules Marcou
Jules Marcou (April 20, 1824 – April 17, 1898) was a French,[1] Swiss[2] and American[3] geologist. Biography[edit] He was born at Salins, in the département of Jura, in France. He was educated at Besançon and at the Collège Saint Louis, Paris.[2] After completing his studies, he made several excursions through Switzerland to recover his health. These trips led him to devote himself to natural science.[4] During these trips, he met Jules Thurmann (1804-1855), who in turn introduced him to Louis Agassiz.[3] In 1845, he worked with Thurmann on a geological survey of the Jura mountains. He was appointed assistant in the mineralogical department of the Sorbonne in 1846, and also classified its collection of fossils.[4] During this time, he conducted geological investigations in various parts of Europe.[1] In 1847 he went to North America as traveling geologist for the Jardin des Plantes, charged with studying the United States and the English possessions in North America
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Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
(German: Universal German Biography) is one of the most important and most comprehensive biographical reference works in the German language.[1] It was published by the Historical Commission of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences between 1875 and 1912 in 56 volumes, printed in Leipzig
Leipzig
by Duncker & Humblot
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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American Academy Of Arts And Sciences
Coordinates: 42°22′51″N 71°06′37″W / 42.380755°N 71.110256°W / 42.380755; -71.110256American Academy of Arts and Sciences American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
logoMotto To cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honour, dignity, and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people.Formation May 4, 1780 (1780-05-04)Type Honorary society and center for policy researchPurpose Honoring excellence and providing service to the nation and the worldHeadquarters Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.Membership4,900 fellows and 600 foreign honorary membersWebsite www.amacad.orgThe House of the Academy, Cambridge, MassachusettsThe American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
is one of the oldest learned societies in the United States of America
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Celâl Şengör
Ali Mehmet Celâl Şengör
Celâl Şengör
(born 24 March 1955) is a Turkish geologist. He is currently on the faculty at Istanbul Technical University, Department of Geological Engineering.[2] After graduating from Robert College, he received his PhD from the State University of New York, Albany in 1982. He also writes a weekly popular science columns in the center-left daily Cumhuriyet.[3] He is married and has one child named Asım Şengör. Professor Şengör is a (foreign) member of The American Philosophical Society, The United States National Academy of Sciences
United States National Academy of Sciences
and The Russian Academy of Sciences. Actually, he is the second Turkish prominent professor who is elected as a member by the Russian Academy of Sciences after Professor ordinarius Mehmet Fuat Köprülü
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Akiho Miyashiro
Akiho Miyashiro (都城 秋穂, Miyashiro Akiho, 1920 – 22 July 2008) was a Japanese geologist. Career[edit] Miyashiro was known for his contributions to metamorphic and igneous petrology. He also made contributions to the study of tectonics and meteorites. In the 1960s he introduced the concept of paired metamorphic belts.[1] In 1973 Miyashiro challenged the common conceptions of ophiolites and proposed an island arc origin for the famous Troodos Ophiolite in Cyprus. This was done arguing that numerous lavas and dykes in the ophiolite had calc-alkaline chemistries.[2] Personal life and death[edit] Miyashiro was a native of Okayama Prefecture. On the evening of 22 July 2008, Miyashiro visited a state park west of Albany, NY and remained there to take sunset pictures while his wife waited by the parking area. Police discovered his body at the base of a cliff on the 24th.[3][4] References[edit]^ Kushiro, Ikuo (2010). "A note on the contributions of Akiho Miyashiro"
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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John Wesley Judd
John Wesley Judd
John Wesley Judd
CB (18 February 1840 – 3 March 1916) was a British geologist. He was born in Portsmouth
Portsmouth
the son of George and Jannette Judd and educated at the Royal School of Mines, where he later became Professor of Geology. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society
Fellow of the Royal Society
in 1877.[1] He was President of the Geological Society
Geological Society
between 1886 and 1888 and awarded their Wollaston Medal
Wollaston Medal
in 1891. Notable pupils of his include Edgeworth David, William Fraser Hume and Frederick Chapman. Family[edit] He married in 1878 Jeannie Frances, daughter of John Jeyes. References[edit]^ "Library and Archive Catalogue". Royal Society
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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