HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bernard Malamud
Bernard Malamud
Bernard Malamud
(April 26, 1914 – March 18, 1986) was an American novelist and short story writer. Along with Saul Bellow
Saul Bellow
and Philip Roth, he was one of the best known American Jewish authors of the 20th century. His baseball novel, The Natural, was adapted into a 1984 film starring Robert Redford. His 1966 novel The Fixer (also filmed), about antisemitism in Tsarist Russia, won both the National Book Award[1] and the Pulitzer Prize.[2] Contents1 Biography 2 Writing career 3 Themes 4 Posthumous tributes4.1 Centenary5 Awards 6 Bibliography6.1 Novels 6.2 Story collections 6.3 Short stories 6.4 Books about Malamud7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksBiography[edit] Bernard Malamud
Bernard Malamud
was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Bertha (née Fidelman) and Max Malamud, Russian Jewish
Russian Jewish
immigrants
[...More...]

"Bernard Malamud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
Brooklyn
brownstones,
[...More...]

"Brooklyn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Roman Catholic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, he was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism, especially William Wordsworth.[1] He was highly critical of much in Victorian society, especially on the declining status of rural people in Britain, such as those from his native South West England. While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898
[...More...]

"Thomas Hardy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
[...More...]

"Manhattan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Washington D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
[...More...]

"Washington D.C." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oregon State University
Oregon
Oregon
State University
University
(OSU) is a coeducational, public research university in the northwest United States, located in Corvallis, Oregon. The university offers more than 200 undergraduate degree programs along with a variety of graduate and doctoral degrees. It is also the largest university in the state, with a total enrollment exceeding 28,000. More than 230,000 people have graduated from OSU since its founding.[5] The Carnegie Foundation designates Oregon
Oregon
State University
University
as a "Community Engagement" university and classifies it as a doctoral university with a status of "Highest research activity". This same designation is shared by 114 other top U.S. academic institutions.[6] OSU is one of 73 land-grant universities in the United States.[7] The school is also a sea-grant, space-grant, and sun-grant institution, making it one of only three U.S
[...More...]

"Oregon State University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Land Grant University
A land-grant university (also called land-grant college or land-grant institution) is an institution of higher education in the United States designated by a state to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for them to sell, to raise funds, to establish and endow "land-grant" colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of practical agriculture, science, military science and engineering (though "without excluding... classical studies"), as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class.[1][2] This mission was in contrast to the historic practice of higher education to focus on an abstract liberal arts curriculum
[...More...]

"Land Grant University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Academy Of Arts And Sciences
Coordinates: 42°22′51″N 71°06′37″W / 42.380755°N 71.110256°W / 42.380755; -71.110256American Academy of Arts and Sciences American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
logoMotto To cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honour, dignity, and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people.Formation May 4, 1780 (1780-05-04)Type Honorary society and center for policy researchPurpose Honoring excellence and providing service to the nation and the worldHeadquarters Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.Membership4,900 fellows and 600 foreign honorary membersWebsite www.amacad.orgThe House of the Academy, Cambridge, MassachusettsThe American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
is one of the oldest learned societies in the United States of America
[...More...]

"American Academy Of Arts And Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornell University
Cornell University
University
(/kɔːrˈnɛl/ kor-NEL) is a private and statutory Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell
Ezra Cornell
and Andrew Dickson White,[7] the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."[1] The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy
[...More...]

"Cornell University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

City College Of New York
The City College of the City University of New York
City University of New York
(more commonly referred to as the City College of New York, or simply City College, CCNY, or City) is a public senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City. Located in Hamilton Heights
Hamilton Heights
overlooking Harlem
Harlem
in Manhattan, City College's 35-acre (14 ha) Collegiate Gothic
Collegiate Gothic
campus spans Convent Avenue from 130th to 141st Streets.[2] It was initially designed by renowned architect George B. Post, and many of its buildings have achieved landmark status
[...More...]

"City College Of New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humanism
Humanism
Humanism
is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence (rationalism and empiricism) over acceptance of dogma or superstition. The meaning of the term humanism has fluctuated according to the successive intellectual movements which have identified with it.[1] The term was coined by theologian Friedrich Niethammer at the beginning of the 19th century to refer to a system of education based on the study of classical literature ("classical humanism")
[...More...]

"Humanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mt. Auburn Cemetery
Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston, Massachusetts. It is the burial site of many prominent members of the Boston Brahmins, as well being a National Historic Landmark. Dedicated in 1831 and set with classical monuments in a rolling landscaped terrain,[2] it marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery," derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots.[3] The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum
[...More...]

"Mt. Auburn Cemetery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge (/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ/[3] KAYM-brij) is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and part of the Boston
Boston
metropolitan area. Situated directly north of Boston, across the Charles River, it was named in honor of the University of Cambridge
University

[...More...]

"Cambridge, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

David Thomson (film Critic)
David Thomson (born 18 February 1941) is a British film critic and historian based in the United States and the author of more than 20 books. His reference works in particular — Have You Seen...?: A Personal Introduction to 1,000 Films (2008) and The New Biographical Dictionary of Film (6th edition, 2014) — have been praised as works of high literary merit and eccentricity. Benjamin Schwarz, writing in The Atlantic Monthly, called him "probably the greatest living film critic and historian" who "writes the most fun and enthralling prose about the movies since Pauline Kael".[1] John Banville
John Banville
called him “the greatest living writer on the movies”.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Personal top 10 films 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Thomson was born in London. He taught film studies at Dartmouth College and has been a regular contributor to The New York Times, Film Comment, Movieline, The New Republic, and Salon
[...More...]

"David Thomson (film Critic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.