HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Benedict Of Nursia
Monte Cassino
Monte Cassino
Abbey, with his burial Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, near Orléans, France Sacro Speco, at Subiaco, ItalyFeast 11 July (General Roman Calendar), (Anglican Communion) 14 March (Byzantine Rite) 21 March (pre-1970 General Roman Calendar)Attributes -Bell -Broken tray -Broken cup and serpent representing poison -Broken utensil -Bush -Crosier -Man in a Benedictine
[...More...]

Benedict (other)
Benedict may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Schools 3 Food 4 Science 5 People5.1 Saints 5.2 Popes 5.3 Antipopes6 See alsoPlaces[edit] Benedict College, South Carolina, United States Benedict (crater), a lunar crater Benedict Glacier, on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada Benedict, Georgia, an unincorporated community Benedict, Kansas, United States Benedict, Maryland, United States Benedict, Minnesota, United States Benedict, Nebraska, United States Benedict, North Dakota, United States Benedikt, Slovenia, a municipality in Slovenia St
[...More...]

picture info

Southern Italy
Southern Italy
Italy
or Mezzogiorno (Italian pronunciation: [ˌmɛddzoˈdʒorno],[2] literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy
Italy
traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies
Kingdom of the two Sicilies
(all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.[3][4][5] Southern Italy
Italy
has many major tourist attractions, such as the Palace of Caserta, the Amalfi
Amalfi
Coast, Pompeii
Pompeii
and other archaeological sites (many of which are protected by UNESCO)
[...More...]

picture info

Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
[...More...]

picture info

Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
Latin
or Sermō Vulgāris ("common speech") was a nonstandard form of Latin
Latin
(as opposed to Classical Latin, the standard and literary version of the language) spoken in the Mediterranean region during and after the classical period of the Roman Empire. It is from Vulgar Latin
Latin
that the Romance languages
Romance languages
developed; the best known are the national languages Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, and French. Works written in Latin
Latin
during classical times and the earlier Middle Ages used Classical Latin
Latin
rather than Vulgar Latin, with very few exceptions (most notably sections of Gaius Petronius' Satyricon). Because of its nonstandard nature, Vulgar Latin
Latin
had no official orthography
[...More...]

picture info

Gothic Language
Gothic is an extinct East Germanic language
Germanic language
that was spoken by the Goths. It is known primarily from the Codex Argenteus, a sixth-century copy of a fourth-century Bible
Bible
translation, and is the only East Germanic language
Germanic language
with a sizable text corpus. All others, including Burgundian and Vandalic, are known, if at all, only from proper names that survived in historical accounts, and from loanwords in other languages such as Portuguese, Spanish, and French. As a Germanic language, Gothic is a part of the Indo-European language family. It is the earliest Germanic language
Germanic language
that is attested in any sizable texts, but it lacks any modern descendants. The oldest documents in Gothic date back to the fourth century
[...More...]

picture info

Eastern Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe, Greece
[...More...]

picture info

Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
[...More...]

picture info

Oriental Orthodoxy
Oriental Orthodoxy[a] is the fourth largest communion of Christian churches, with about 76 million members worldwide. As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Armenia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan
Sudan
and parts of the Middle East
Middle East
and India
[...More...]

picture info

Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
[...More...]

picture info

Old Catholic Church
The term Old Catholic
Old Catholic
Church was used from the 1850s, by groups which had separated from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
over certain doctrines, primarily concerned with papal authority; some of these groups, especially in the Netherlands, had already existed long before the term. These churches are not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church. Member churches of the Union of Utrecht
Utrecht
of the Old Catholic Churches (UU) are in full communion with the Anglican Communion,[1] and some are members of the World Council of Churches.[2] The formation of the Old Catholic
Old Catholic
communion of Germans, Austrians and Swiss began in 1870 at a public meeting held in Nuremberg
Nuremberg
under the leadership of Ignaz von Döllinger, following the First Vatican Council
[...More...]

picture info

Patron Saints Of Europe
A number of symbols of Europe
Europe
have emerged since antiquity. In present day, each of these may either apply to the continent as a whole, European unity or specifically to the European Union
European Union
(EU). Several symbols were introduced in the 1950s and 1960s by the Council of Europe
Europe
(CoE)
[...More...]

picture info

Subiaco, Lazio
Subiaco is a town and comune in the Metropolitan City of Rome, in Lazio, central Italy, 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Tivoli alongside the river Aniene. It is mainly renowned as a tourist and religious resort for its sacred grotto (Sacro Speco), in the medieval St Benedict's Abbey, and for the Abbey of Santa Scolastica. At a time when several German monks had been assigned to the monastery, German printers established a printing press in the town. They printed the first books in Italy
Italy
in the late 15th century.Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 People 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Among the first ancient settlers in the area were the Aequi, an Italic people. In 304 BC they were conquered by the Romans, who introduced their civilization and took advantage of the waters of the Aniene river
[...More...]

picture info

Order Of Saint Benedict
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
[...More...]

Institute Of Christ The King Sovereign Priest
An institute is an organisational body created for a certain purpose. Often they are research organisations (research institutions) created to do research on specific topics. An institute can also be a professional body, or one involved in adult education, see Mechanics' Institutes. In some countries institutes can be part of a university or other institutions of higher education, either as a group of departments or an autonomous educational institution without a traditional university status such as a "university Institute". (See Institute
Institute
of Technology) The word "institute" comes from the Latin
Latin
word institutum meaning "facility" or "habit"; from instituere meaning "build", "create", "raise" or "educate". In some countries, such as South Korea
South Korea
and Japan, private schools are sometimes referred to as institutes, rather than schools
[...More...]

picture info

Rule Of Saint Benedict
The Rule of Saint Benedict
Rule of Saint Benedict
(Latin: Regula Benedicti) is a book of precepts written by Benedict of Nursia
Benedict of Nursia
(c. AD 480–550) for monks living communally under the authority of an abbot.An 8th-century copy of the Rule of Saint BenedictThe spirit of Saint Benedict's Rule is summed up in the motto of the Benedictine
Benedictine
Confederation: pax ("peace") and the traditional ora et labora ("pray and work"). Compared to other precepts, the Rule provides a moderate path between individual zeal and formulaic institutionalism; because of this middle ground it has been widely popular
[...More...]

.