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Belton Flintlock
The Belton flintlock
Belton flintlock
was a repeating flintlock design using superposed loads, conceived by Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, resident Joseph Belton some time prior to 1777. The musket design was offered by Belton to the newly formed Continental Congress
Continental Congress
in 1777. Belton wrote that the musket could fire eight rounds with one loading,[1] and that he could support his claims "by experimental proof."[2] Belton failed to sell the musket to Congress, and later was unable to sell the design to the British Army a year after the American Revolution.[1] There are no records that indicate that the gun was ever supplied, and it is uncertain if or how exactly the Belton improvement operated.[2] Musket
Musket
Design[edit] There are no known surviving examples of Belton's musket
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Flintlock
Flintlock
Flintlock
is a general term for any firearm that uses a flint striking ignition mechanism. The term may also apply to a particular form of the mechanism itself, also known as the true flintlock, that was introduced in the early 17th century, and rapidly replaced earlier firearm-ignition technologies, such as the matchlock, the wheellock, and the earlier flintlock mechanisms. The true flintlock continued to be in common use for over two centuries, replaced by percussion cap and, later, the cartridge-based systems in the early-to-mid 19th century
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Snap Matchlock
The snap matchlock is a type of matchlock mechanism used to ignite early firearms. It was used in Europe from about 1475 to 1640, and in Japan
Japan
from 1543 till about 1880.[1]Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The serpentine (a curved lever with a clamp on the end) was held in firing position by a weak spring,[2] and released by pressing a button, pulling a trigger, or even pulling a short string passing into the mechanism. The slow match held in the serpentine swung into a flash pan containing priming powder. The flash from the flash pan travelled through the touch hole igniting the main propellant charge of the gun
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Heilongjiang Hand Cannon
The Heilongjiang
Heilongjiang
hand cannon or hand-guna[›] is a bronze hand cannon[1] manufactured no later than 1288 and is possibly the world's oldest confirmed surviving firearm.[2] It weighs 3.55 kg (7.83 pounds) and is 34 centimeters (13.4 inches) long
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Howdah Pistol
The howdah pistol was a large-calibre handgun, often with two or four barrels, used in India and Africa from the beginning of the nineteenth century, and into the early twentieth century, during the British Empire era. It was typically intended for defence against tigers, lions, and other dangerous animals that might be encountered in remote areas. Multi-barreled breech-loading designs were later favoured over contemporary revolvers, due to their higher velocity and faster reloading potential.[1] The term "howdah pistol" comes from the howdah, a large platform mounted on the back of an elephant. Hunters, particularly in British Raj India, used howdahs as a platform for hunting, and needed large-calibre side-arms for protection against close quarters animal attacks.[2] The practice of hunting from the howdah basket on top of an Asian elephant
Asian elephant
was first made popular by the joint Anglo-Indian East India Company during the 1790s
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Huochong
Huochong (simplified Chinese: 火铳; traditional Chinese: 火銃) was the Chinese name for hand cannons.[1] The oldest confirmed metal huochong, also the first cannon, is a bronze hand cannon bearing an inscription dating it to 1298.[2] By the time of the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) two types of huochong were in use. One was a hand held version with a wooden shaft known as a shouchong (手铳) whilst the larger Wankouchong (碗口铳)or Zhankouchong (盏口铳) rested on a supporting wooden frame.[3] References[edit]^ "Chinese Military Technology and Dai Viet: c. 1390-1497" (PDF). September 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2010. Retrieved November 18, 2010.  ^ "The World's Earliest Cannon (世界上最早的火炮)" (in Chinese)
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Huolongjing
The Huolongjing
Huolongjing
(traditional Chinese: 火龍經; simplified Chinese: 火龙经; pinyin: Huǒ Lóng Jīng; Wade-Giles: Huo Lung Ching; rendered in English as Fire Drake Manual or Fire Dragon Manual), also known as Huoqitu (“ Firearm
Firearm
Illustrations”), is a 14th-century military treatise compiled and edited by Jiao Yu
Jiao Yu
and Liu Bowen
Liu Bowen
of the early Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
(1368–1683)
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Jingal
A jingal, gingal or gingall (/ˈdʒɪn.ɡɔːl/), from Hindi
Hindi
janjal, is a type of gun, usually a light piece mounted on a swivel;[1] frequently a form of wall gun either by design or use. It sometimes takes the form of a heavy musket fired from a rest.[1] The weapon was used by the Chinese and Indians in the 19th century, such as by the Taiping armies. This weapon figures in Kipling's poem "The Grave of the Hundred Head". See also[edit]Wall pieceReferences[edit]^ a b  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Gingall". Encyclopædia Britannica. 12 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 27. Further reading[edit]Perrett, Bryan (2000). Gunboat!. Cassel & Co
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Kalthoff Repeater
The Kalthoff repeater
Kalthoff repeater
was a type of repeating firearm that appeared in the seventeenth century and remained unmatched in its fire rate until the mid-nineteenth century. As its inventor is unknown, it is named after the Kalthoff gunsmiths who came to be associated with the design. Description[edit] The Kalthoff had two magazines, one for powder and one for balls (some had a third for priming powder). A single forward-and-back motion on the trigger guard powered a mechanism that deposited a ball and load of powder in the breech and cocked the gun. Within one or two seconds, it was ready to fire again. A small carrier took the powder from the magazine to the breech, so there was no risk of an accidental ignition in the reserve. Early Kalthoff guns were wheellocks, but later they became flintlocks
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Matchlock
The matchlock was the first mechanism invented to facilitate the firing of a hand-held firearm. Before this, firearms (like the hand cannon) had to be fired by applying a lit match (or equivalent) to the priming powder in the flash pan by hand; this had to be done carefully, taking most of the soldier's concentration at the moment of firing, or in some cases required a second soldier to fire the weapon while the first held the weapon steady. Adding a matchlock made the firing action simple and reliable by a single soldier, allowing him to keep both hands steadying the gun and eyes on the target while firing.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Modern use 4 ReferencesDescription[edit]Engraving of musketeers from the Thirty Years' WarThe classic European matchlock gun held a burning slow match in a clamp at the end of a small curved lever known as the serpentine
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Miquelet Lock
Miquelet lock
Miquelet lock
is a modern term used by collectors and curators, largely in the English-speaking world, for a type of firing mechanism used in muskets and pistols. It is a distinctive form of snaplock, originally as a flint-against-steel ignition form, once prevalent in Spain, Portugal, Italy, the Balkans, North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and throughout Spain's colonies from the late 16th to the mid 19th centuries. The term miquelet lock was not recorded until the 19th century, long after the appearance of the mechanism in the 16th century, and is of uncertain origin
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Muzzleloader
A muzzleloader is any firearm into which the projectile and usually the propellant charge is loaded from the muzzle of the gun (i.e., from the forward, open end of the gun's barrel). This is distinct from the more popular modern (higher tech and harder to make) designs of breech-loading firearms. The term "muzzleloader" applies to both rifled and smoothbore type muzzleloaders, and may also refer to the marksman who specializes in the shooting of such firearms. The firing methods, paraphernalia and mechanism further divide both categories as do caliber (from cannons to small-caliber palm guns). Modern muzzleloading firearms range from reproductions of sidelock, flintlock and percussion long guns, to in-line rifles that use modern inventions such as a closed breech, sealed primer and fast rifling to allow for considerable accuracy at long ranges. Modern mortars use a shell with the propelling charge and primer attached at the base
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Nock Gun
The Nock gun
Nock gun
was a seven-barrelled flintlock smoothbore firearm used by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
during the early stages of the Napoleonic Wars. It is a type of volley gun adapted for ship-to-ship fighting, but was limited in its use because of the powerful recoil and eventually discontinued.[1] Its bizarre appearance and operation has led to it being portrayed in modern fictional works, notably in The Alamo feature film, and the Richard Sharpe series of novels by Bernard Cornwell.[1]Contents1 History and design 2 Deployment and use 3 Popular culture 4 ReferencesHistory and design[edit] The weapon was invented by British engineer James Wilson in 1779, and named after Henry Nock, the London-based armaments manufacturer contracted to build the gun. It was intended to be fired from the rigging of Royal Navy
Royal Navy
warships onto the deck in the event that the ship was boarded by enemy sailors
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Snaphance
A snaphance or snaphaunce is a type of lock for firing a gun or is a gun using that mechanism.[1] The name is Dutch in origin but the mechanism can not be attributed to the Netherlands with certainty. It is the mechanical progression of the wheellock firing mechanism, and along with the miquelet lock and doglock are predecessors of the flintlock mechanism. It fires from a flint struck against a striker plate above a steel pan to ignite the priming powder which fires the gun.[2] Examples of this firearm can be found through Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East
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Hand Cannon
The hand cannon (Chinese: 手銃), also known as the gonne or handgonne, is the first true firearm and the successor of the fire lance.[1] It is the oldest type of small arms as well as the most mechanically simplistic form of metal barrel firearms. Unlike matchlock firearms it requires direct manual external ignition through a touch hole without any form of firing mechanism. It may also be considered a forerunner of the handgun
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Snaplock
A snaplock is a type of lock for firing a gun or is a gun fired by such a lock. A snaplock ignites the (usually muzzleloading) weapon's propellant by means of sparks produced when a spring-powered cock strikes a flint down on to a piece of hardened steel. The snaplock is therefore similar to the snaphaunce (sometimes classed as an advanced type of snaplock) and the later flintlock (see below). In all snaplocks, the flint is held in a clamp at the end of a bent lever called the cock. When the gun is "cocked", the cock is held back, against the pressure of a spring, by a catch which is part of the trigger mechanism. When the trigger is pulled, the catch is released and the spring moves the cock rapidly forwards. The flint strikes a curved plate of hardened steel, called the "steel"
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