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Belarusian Cuisine
Belarusian cuisine
Belarusian cuisine
shares many similarities with cuisines of other Eastern, Central and Northeastern European countries, basing predominantly bases on meat and various vegetables typical for the region.Contents1 History 2 Meals 3 Cereals 4 Vegetables 5 Soups 6 Meat 7 Dumplings 8 Dairy products 9 Beverages 10 Minority cuisines 11 Potatoes 12 Salads 13 Fish 14 Side dishes 15 References 16 Further reading 17 External linksHistory[edit] Belarus
Belarus
cuisine has predominantly Slavic roots. Along with a Ruthenian influence, it is also linked with Lithuanian and Polish because of the long intermingling of these three peoples; first within the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (11th-15th centuries) and later within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
(16th-17th centuries)
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Pea
The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum
Pisum
sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Pea
Pea
pods are botanically fruit,[2] since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae
Fabaceae
such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus. P. sativum is an annual plant, with a life cycle of one year. It is a cool-season crop grown in many parts of the world; planting can take place from winter to early summer depending on location
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Lasagna
Lasagne
Lasagne
(/ləˈzænjə, -ˈzɑːn-, -ˈsɑːn-/; Italian: [laˈzaɲɲe]; singular lasagna) are wide, flat pasta, and possibly one of the oldest types of pasta.[1] "Lasagne", or the singular "lasagna", commonly refers to a dish made with several layers of lasagne sheets alternated with sauces and other ingredients, such as meats and cheese.[2]Contents1 Origins and history 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksOrigins and history[edit] Lasagne
Lasagne
originated in Italy
Italy
during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and has traditionally been ascribed to the city of Naples
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Buckwheat
Buckwheat
Buckwheat
( Fagopyrum
Fagopyrum
esculentum), also known as common buckwheat, Japanese buckwheat and silverhull buckwheat,[2] is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. A related and more bitter species, Fagopyrum
Fagopyrum
tataricum, a domesticated food plant common in Asia, but not as common in Europe
Europe
or North America, is also referred to as buckwheat. Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. Because its seeds are eaten and rich in complex carbohydrates, it is referred to as a pseudocereal
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Slavic Peoples
Slavs
Slavs
are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages
Slavic languages
of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group. They are native to Eurasia, stretching from Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe
Europe
all the way north and westwards to Northeast Europe
Europe
, Northern Asia (Siberia), the Caucasus, and Central Asia (especially Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Turkmenistan) as well as historically in Western Europe
Europe
(particularly in East Germany) and Western Asia (including Anatolia)
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Barley
Barley
Barley
( Hordeum
Hordeum
vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia
Eurasia
as early as 10,000 years ago.[3] Barley
Barley
has been used as animal fodder, as a source of fermentable material for beer and certain distilled beverages, and as a component of various health foods. It is used in soups and stews, and in barley bread of various cultures
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Vodka
Vodka
Vodka
(from Polish: wódka, Russian: водка [ˈvotkə]) is a distilled beverage composed primarily of water and ethanol, but sometimes with traces of impurities and flavorings
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Rye Bread
Rye
Rye
bread is a type of bread made with various proportions of flour from rye grain. It can be light or dark in color, depending on the type of flour used and the addition of coloring agents, and is typically denser than bread made from wheat flour. It is higher in fiber than white bread and is often darker in color and stronger in flavor. Dark rye bread was considered a staple through the Middle Ages
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Bun
A bun is a small, sometimes sweet, bread, or bread roll.[1] Though they come in many shapes and sizes, they are most commonly hand-sized or smaller, with a round top and flat bottom. Buns are usually made from flour, sugar, milk, yeast and butter. Common varieties contain small fruit or nuts, are topped with icing or caramel, or filled with jam or cream. Some types of buns are filled with various meats. "Bun" may also refer to particular types of filled dumplings, such as Chinese baozi. Some of these types of dumplings may be bread-like in texture. A bun is normally made from dough that has been enriched with sugar and butter and sometimes egg
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Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
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Vitebsk
Vitebsk, or Vitsebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, Łacinka: Viciebsk, pronounced [ˈvʲitsʲepsk]; Russian: Витебск, pronounced [ˈvʲitʲɪpsk], Lithuanian: Vitebskas), is a city in Belarus. The capital of the Vitebsk
Vitebsk
Region, it had 342,381 inhabitants in 2004, making it the country's fourth-largest city
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Salad
A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables.[1][2] Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which is served warm. Salads may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Garden salads use a base of leafy greens like lettuce, arugula, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad, and Japanese sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad)
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Cake
Cake
Cake
is a form of sweet dessert that is typically baked. In its oldest forms, cakes were modifications of breads, but cakes now cover a wide range of preparations that can be simple or elaborate, and that share features with other desserts such as pastries, meringues, custards, and pies. Typical cake ingredients are flour, sugar, eggs, butter or oil or margarine, a liquid, and leavening agents, such as baking soda or baking powder. Common additional ingredients and flavourings include dried, candied, or fresh fruit, nuts, cocoa, and extracts such as vanilla, with numerous substitutions for the primary ingredients. Cakes can also be filled with fruit preserves,nuts or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders, or candied fruit.[1] Cake
Cake
is often served as a celebratory dish on ceremonial occasions, such as weddings, anniversaries, and birthdays
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Cabbage
Cabbage
Cabbage
or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. It is descended from the wild cabbage, B. oleracea var. oleracea, and belongs to the "cole crops", meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var. botrytis); Brussels sprouts (var. gemmifera); and savoy cabbage (var. sabauda). Brassica rapa
Brassica rapa
is commonly named Chinese, celery or napa cabbage and has many of the same uses. Cabbage
Cabbage
heads generally range from 0.5 to 4 kilograms (1 to 9 lb), and can be green, purple or white. Smooth-leafed, firm-headed green cabbages are the most common. Smooth-leafed purple cabbages and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colors are more rare. It is a multi-layered vegetable
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Cereal
Cereal
Cereal
is any grass cultivated for the edible components of its grain (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis), composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal
Cereal
grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop[1] and are therefore staple crops. Edible grains from other plant families, such as buckwheat (Polygonaceae), quinoa (Amaranthaceae) and chia (Lamiaceae), are referred to as pseudocereals. In their natural form (as in whole grain), cereals are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, oils, and protein. When refined by the removal of the bran and germ, the remaining endosperm is mostly carbohydrate. In some developing countries, grain in the form of rice, wheat, millet, or maize constitutes a majority of daily sustenance
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