HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
(/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪˌtoʊvən/ ( listen), /ˈbeɪtˌhoʊvən/; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːtˌhoˑfn̩] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Classical music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best-known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 piano concertos, 1 violin concerto, 32 piano sonatas, 16 string quartets, his great Mass the Missa solemnis, and one opera, Fidelio. Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne
Electorate of Cologne
and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven
Johann van Beethoven
and by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe
[...More...]

"Beethoven" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Missa Solemnis (Beethoven)
H. Berthold AG was one of the largest and most successful type foundries in the world for most of the modern typographic era, making the transition from foundry type to cold type successfully and only coming to dissolution in the digital type era.Contents1 History 2 Cold Type 3 Digital Type3.1 Diatronic 3.2 Berthold ADS (Akzidenz Dialog System)4 Successor Corporations 5 Typefaces 6 Cold Typefaces 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Established in 1858 by Hermann Berthold[1] and based in Berlin, the company played a key role in the introduction of major new typefaces and was a successful player in the development of typesetting machines.[2] The production premises were on Wilhelmstrasse
Wilhelmstrasse
No. 1 until 1868, and then on Mehringdamm
Mehringdamm
43. In 1979 the factory moved to another location between Teltow Canal
Teltow Canal
and Wiesenweg in Lichterfelde. The H
[...More...]

"Missa Solemnis (Beethoven)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Dutch Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Duchy Of Brabant
The Duchy of Brabant was a State of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
established in 1183. It developed from the Landgraviate of Brabant and formed the heart of the historic Low Countries, part of the Burgundian Netherlands
Netherlands
from 1430 and of the Habsburg Netherlands
Habsburg Netherlands
from 1482, until it was partitioned after the Dutch revolt. Present-day North Brabant
North Brabant
(Staats-Brabant) was adjudicated to the Generality Lands
Generality Lands
of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
according to the 1648 Peace of Westphalia, while the reduced duchy remained part of the Southern Netherlands
Netherlands
until it was conquered by French Revolutionary forces in 1794
[...More...]

"Duchy Of Brabant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flemish Region
The Flemish Region (Dutch:  Vlaams Gewest (help·info); French: Région flamande) is one of the three official regions of the Kingdom of Belgium—alongside the Walloon Region and the Brussels-Capital Region. Colloquially, it is usually simply referred to as Flanders. It occupies the northern part of Belgium and covers an area of 13,522 km2 (44.29% of Belgium). It is one of the most densely populated regions of Europe with around 480 inhabitants per square kilometer.Contents1 Politics 2 Administrative divisions 3 Economy3.1 Transport4 Demographics4.1 Cities 4.2 Language5 International relations5.1 Twin towns and sister cities6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPolitics[edit] Immediately after its establishment in 1980, the region transferred all its constitutional competencies to the Flemish Community
[...More...]

"Flemish Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Belgium
Coordinates: 50°50′N 4°00′E / 50.833°N 4.000°E / 50.833; 4.000Kingdom of BelgiumKoninkrijk België  (Dutch) Royaume de Belgique  (French) Königreich Belgien  (German)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Eendracht maakt macht" (Dutch) "L'union fait la force" (French) "Einigkeit macht stark" (German) "Unity makes Strength"Anthem: "La Brabançonne" "The Brabantian"Location of  Belgium  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Brussels 50°51′N 4°21′E / 50.850°N 4.350°E / 50.850; 4.350Official languages Dutch French GermanEthnic groups see DemographicsReligion (2015[1])60.7% Christianity 32.0% No religion 5.2% Islam 2.1% Other religionsDemonym BelgianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitu
[...More...]

"Belgium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
[...More...]

"German Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cognate
In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.[1] For example, the English word dish and the German word Tisch ("table"), are cognates because they both come from Latin discus, which relates to their flat surfaces. Cognates may have evolved similar, different or even opposite meanings. But, in most cases, there are some similar letters in the word. Some words sound similar, but don't come from the same root. These are called false cognates and are described in more detail below. In etymology, the cognate category excludes doublets and loanwords. The word cognate derives from the Latin
Latin
noun cognatus, which means "blood relative".[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Across languages 3 Within the same language 4 False cognates 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Cognates do not need to have the same meaning, which may have changed as the languages developed separately
[...More...]

"Cognate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Holy Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electorate Of Cologne
The Electorate of Cologne
Cologne
(German: Kurfürstentum Köln), sometimes referred to as Electoral Cologne
Cologne
(German: Kurköln), was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that existed from the 10th to the early 19th century. It consisted of the Hochstift
Hochstift
— the temporal possessions — of the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Cologne
Cologne
and ruled by him in his capacity as prince-elector. There were only two other ecclesiastical prince-electors in the Empire: the Electorate of Mainz and the Electorate of Trier
[...More...]

"Electorate Of Cologne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Violin
The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments are known, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow (col legno). Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments and in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz
[...More...]

"Violin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Child Prodigy
In psychology research literature, the term child prodigy is defined as a person under the age of ten who produces meaningful output in some domain to the level of an adult expert performer.[1][2][3] The term Wunderkind (from German: Wunderkind, literally "wonder child") is sometimes used as a synonym for "prodigy", particularly in media accounts
[...More...]

"Child Prodigy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archbishopric Of Trier
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
[...More...]

"Archbishopric Of Trier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electoral Palace, Bonn
The Electoral Palace (German: Kurfürstliches Schloss) in Bonn is the former residential palace of the Prince-Electors of Cologne. Since 1818, it has been the University of Bonn's main building in the city center, home to the University administration and the faculty of humanities and theology. It was built by Enrico Zuccalli for the prince-elector Joseph Clemens of Bavaria from 1697 to 1705. The Hofgarten, a large park in front of the main building, is a popular place for students to meet, study and relax. The Hofgarten was repeatedly a place for political demonstrations, as for example the demonstration against the NATO Double-Track Decision on 22 October 1981, with about 250,000 participants.[1] References[edit]^ Haus der Geschichte der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. "Weg der Demokratie - Path of Democracy"
[...More...]

"Electoral Palace, Bonn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Organist
An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. An organist may play solo organ works, play with an ensemble or orchestra, or accompany one or more singers or instrumental soloists. In addition, an organist may accompany congregational hymn-singing and play liturgical music.Contents1 Classical and church organists1.1 Ancient titles still in current use2 Theatre organists 3 Organists in popular music 4 Organizations 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksClassical and church organists[edit] The majority of organists, amateur and professional, are principally involved in church music, playing in churches and cathedrals. The pipe organ still plays a large part in the leading of traditional western Christian worship, with roles including the accompaniment of hymns, choral anthems and other parts of the worship. The degree to which the organ is involved varies depending on the church and denomination. It also may depend on the standard of the organist
[...More...]

"Organist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.