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Beer Cocktail
A beer cocktail is a cocktail that is made by mixing beer with a distilled beverage or another style of beer. In this type of cocktail, the primary ingredient is beer. A mixture of beer with a beverage that contains a soft drink is usually called a shandy. List of beer cocktails[edit] Black and Tan
Black and Tan
– Made from a blend of pale ale and a dark beer such as a stout or porter. Traditionally uses bitter and stout. Black Velvet – Stout
Stout
with some sparkling wine or champagne. Cheap version uses cider and stout. Boilermaker – Mild ale mixed with bottled brown ale or in the US a glass of beer with a shot of whiskey. Brass Monkey – Beverage created by adding orange juice to a partially drunk 40 ounce
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Shot Glass
A shot glass is a small glass originally designed to hold or measure spirits or liquor, which is either imbibed straight from the glass ("a shot") or poured into a cocktail ("a drink"). An alcoholic beverage served in a shot glass and typically consumed quickly, in one gulp, may also be known as a "shooter". Shot glasses decorated with a wide variety of toasts, advertisements, humorous pictures, or other decorations and words are popular souvenirs and collectibles, especially as merchandise of a brewery.[1]Contents1 Name origin 2 Earliest shot glasses 3 Sizes 4 Shot-measuring tools4.1 Jigger 4.2 Measuring shot glass5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName origin[edit] The word "shot", meaning a drink of alcohol, has been used since at least the 17th century, while reference to a shot specifically as a small drink of spirits is known in the U.S
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Lemon Juice
The lemon, Citrus
Citrus
limon (L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia. The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.[2] The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking
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Midori Liqueur
Midori is a sweet, bright green-coloured, muskmelon-flavored liqueur made by Suntory. It is manufactured in Japan, the United States, Mexico, and France. It was made exclusively in Japan
Japan
until 1987. Midori is typically 20–21% alcohol by volume. Its name is the Japanese word for "green". The Midori formulated in France is sweeter than the original Japanese version. As it is extremely sweet, Midori is not usually taken "straight"; it is generally used in a cocktail, e.g., the Japanese slipper, which is a cocktail composed of Midori, Cointreau, and lemon juice
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Amaretto
Amaretto
Amaretto
(Italian for "a little bitter") is a sweet Italian liqueur that originated in Saronno, Italy. While originally flavoured from bitter almonds, various modern commercial brands are prepared from a base of apricot pits, peach pits, or almonds, all of which are natural sources of the benzaldehyde that provides the principal almond-like flavour of the liqueur.[1][2] When served as a beverage, amaretto can be drunk by itself, used as an ingredient to create several popular mixed drinks, or added to coffee. Amaretto
Amaretto
is also commonly used in culinary applications.Contents1 Origin1.1 Etymology 1.2 Legend2 Notable Brands 3 Usage3.1 Cooking 3.2 Beverages4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksOrigin[edit] Etymology[edit] The name amaretto originated as a diminutive of the Italian word amaro, meaning "bitter", which references the distinctive flavour lent by the mandorla amara or by the drupe kernel
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Dr Pepper
Dr Pepper
Dr Pepper
is a carbonated soft drink marketed as having a unique flavor. The drink was created in the 1880s by pharmacist Charles Alderton in Waco, Texas
Waco, Texas
and first served around 1885
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Brandy
Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy
Brandy
generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically drunk as an after-dinner digestif. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks, others are coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of aging, and some are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring. Varieties of wine brandy can be found across the winemaking world
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Gin
Gin
Gin
is liquor which derives its predominant flavour from juniper berries (Juniperus communis). Gin
Gin
is one of the broadest categories of spirits, all of various origins, styles, and flavour profiles that revolve around juniper as a common ingredient.[1][2] From its earliest origins in the Middle Ages, the drink has evolved from a herbal medicine to an object of commerce in the spirits industry
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Rum
Rum
Rum
is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses or honeys, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels. The majority of the world's rum production occurs in the Caribbean
Caribbean
and Latin
Latin
America. Rum
Rum
is also produced in Austria, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, the Philippines, Reunion Island, Mauritius, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan, the United States, Canada, India, and Nepal. Rums are produced in various grades. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas "golden" and "dark" rums were typically consumed straight or neat, on the rocks, or used for cooking, but are now commonly consumed with mixers
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Irish Cream
Irish cream
Irish cream
is a cream liqueur based on Irish whiskey, cream, and other ingredients such as coffee, which can be served on its own, as an alcoholic substitute for milk/cream and sugar in a hot coffee (sometimes with whipped cream added on top), or used in mixed drinks or as part of a shot or a whole shot. Irish cream's largest markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. Irish cream
Irish cream
typically has 15 to 20% alcohol by volume (ABV), with a proof level of 30 to 40
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Irish Whiskey
Irish whiskey
Irish whiskey
(Irish: Fuisce or uisce beatha) is whiskey made on the island of Ireland. The word "whiskey" is an Anglicisation of the first word in the Gaelic phrase, uisce beatha, meaning "water of life" (modern Irish: uisce beatha, Scottish: uisge beatha and Manx: ushtey bea). The phrase was a translation of the Latin
Latin
term aqua vitae, which was commonly used to describe distilled spirits during the Middle Ages. Peat
Peat
is rarely used in the malting process, so that Irish whiskey
Irish whiskey
has a smoother finish as opposed to the smoky, earthy overtones common to some Scotches
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Salt
Table salt or common salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of salts; salt in its natural form as a crystalline mineral is known as rock salt or halite. Salt
Salt
is present in vast quantities in seawater, where it is the main mineral constituent. The open ocean has about 35 grams (1.2 oz) of solids per litre, a salinity of 3.5%. Salt
Salt
is essential for life in general, and saltiness is one of the basic human tastes. Salt
Salt
is one of the oldest and most ubiquitous food seasonings, and salting is an important method of food preservation. Some of the earliest evidence of salt processing dates to around 8,000 years ago, when people living in the area of present-day Romania boiled spring water to extract salts; a salt-works in China dates to approximately the same period
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Tom Sharpe
Thomas Ridley Sharpe (30 March 1928 – 6 June 2013)[1] was an English satirical novelist, best known for his Wilt series, as well as Porterhouse Blue
Porterhouse Blue
and Blott on the Landscape, which were both adapted for television. Pembroke College, Cambridge
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Worcestershire Sauce
Worcestershire sauce
Worcestershire sauce
(/ˈwʊstərʃər/ ( listen)),[3] (Merriam-Webster: ˈwu̇s-tə(r)-ˌshir-, -shər- also -ˌshī(-ə)r- ), frequently shortened to Worcester
Worcester
sauce (/ˈwʊstər/), is a fermented liquid condiment of complex mixture originally created by the Worcester
Worcester
chemists John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, who went on to form the company Lea & Perrins. The ingredients are allowed to mature for 18 months before being blended and bottled in Worcester, where the exact recipe is kept a secret. Lea and Perrins devised the recipe in the 1830s, however it was not to their liking and was set aside and forgotten about. It was not until the barrels were rediscovered many months later that the taste had mellowed into what is now known as Worcestershire sauce
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Valentina (sauce)
Valentina is a brand of pourable hot sauce manufactured by Salsa Tamazula, a company in Guadalajara, Mexico. It is typically sold in 12.5-ounce and very large (one-liter or 34-ounce) glass bottles, with a flip-top cap permanently attached to the bottle (the cap does not unscrew). The irregular red shape on the label is a map of the Mexican state of Jalisco. The sauce, like the parent company's Tamazula hot sauce, is made with puya chilis from Jalisco state, similar to the Guajillo chili and known by the name guajillo puya[1] Valentina is described as thicker than Tabasco sauce and less vinegary, with more chili flavor.[2] It comes in two varieties, hot and extra hot, and the sauce is known for its use on tacos and its taste,[3] not only for its heat. Valentina's ingredients are water, chili peppers, vinegar, salt, spices and sodium benzoate (as a preservative).[4] See also[edit]List of hot sauces Scoville heat scale Food portalReferences[edit]^ Kennedy, D. (2014)
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Hot Sauce
Hot sauce, also known as chili sauce or pepper sauce, is any condiment, seasoning, or salsa made from chili peppers and other ingredients.Contents1 History 2 Ingredients 3 Styles3.1 South and Central America 3.2 North America 3.3 Asia3.3.1 East Asia 3.3.2 South and Southeast Asia3.4 Middle East and North Africa 3.5 Sub-Saharan Africa 3.6 Europe 3.7 Oceania4 Heat 5 Remedies 6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Humans have used chili peppers and other hot spices for thousands of years. Inhabitants of Mexico, Central America
Central America
and South America
South America
had chili peppers more than 6,000 years ago
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