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Beauvais
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Beauvais
Beauvais
(French pronunciation: ​[bovɛ]) archaic English: Beawayes, Beeway, Boway, is a city and commune in northern France. It serves as the capital of the Oise
Oise
département, in the Hauts-de-France region. Beauvais
Beauvais
is located approximately 75 kilometres (47 miles) from Paris. The residents of the city are called Beauvaisiens. The municipality (commune) of Beauvais
Beauvais
has a population of 54,289 as of 2012[update], population estimate from the Insee, and ranks as the most populous city in the Oise
Oise
department, and the third most-populous city in Picardy
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Sunlight
Sunlight
Sunlight
is a portion of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun, in particular infrared, visible, and ultraviolet light. On Earth, sunlight is filtered through Earth's atmosphere, and is obvious as daylight when the Sun
Sun
is above the horizon. When the direct solar radiation is not blocked by clouds, it is experienced as sunshine, a combination of bright light and radiant heat. When it is blocked by clouds or reflects off other objects, it is experienced as diffused light
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Gaulish
Gaulish is an ancient Celtic language that was spoken in parts of Europe as late as the Roman Empire. In the narrow sense, Gaulish was the language spoken by the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul
Gaul
(modern France, Belgium and Northern Italy). In a wider sense, it also comprises varieties of Celtic that were spoken across much of central Europe ("Noric"), parts of the Balkans, and Asia Minor ("Galatian"), which are thought to have been closely related.[2][3] The more divergent Lepontic of Northern Italy
Northern Italy
has also sometimes been subsumed under Gaulish.[4][5] Together with Lepontic and the Celtiberian language
Celtiberian language
spoken in the Iberian Peninsula, Gaulish forms the geographic group of Continental Celtic languages
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Institut National De La Statistique Et Des études économiques
The National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques), abbreviated INSEE (French pronunciation: ​[inse]), is the French national statistics bureau. It collects and publishes information about the French economy and people, and carries out the periodic national census. Headquartered in Paris, it is the French branch of Eurostat. The INSEE was created in 1946 as a successor to the Vichy regime's National Statistics Service (SNS).Contents1 Purpose 2 Organisation2.1 Teaching and research3 Codes and numbering system 4 History4.1 Statistics in France
France
before INSEE 4.2 Creation of INSEE 4.3 List of directors5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPurpose[edit] INSEE is responsible for the production and analysis of official statistics in France
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Prefectures Of France
A prefecture (French: préfecture) in France
France
may refer to:the Chef-lieu de département, the town in which the administration of a department is located; the Chef-lieu de région, the town in which the administration of a region is located; the jurisdiction of a prefecture; the official residence or headquarters of a prefect.Contents1 Role of the prefecture 2 Paris 3 Divisions of departments 4 See alsoRole of the prefecture[edit] There are 101 prefectures in France, one for each department. The official in charge is the prefect (French: préfet)
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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De Bello Gallico
Commentāriī dē Bellō Gallicō (English: Commentaries on the Gallic War), also Bellum Gallicum (English: Gallic War), is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative
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Julius Caesar
Gaius Julius Caesar[a] (/ˈsiːzər/; 12 or 13 July 100 BC[1] – 15 March 44 BC),[2] usually called Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the rise of the Roman Empire. He is also known as a notable author of Latin
Latin
prose. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus
Crassus
and Pompey
Pompey
formed a political alliance that dominated Roman politics
Roman politics
for several years. Their attempts to amass power as Populares were opposed by the Optimates within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger
Cato the Younger
with the frequent support of Cicero
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Roman Mile
The mile is an English unit of length of linear measure equal to 5,280 feet, or 1,760 yards, and standardised as exactly 1,609.344 metres by international agreement in 1959. With qualifiers, "mile" is also used to describe or translate a wide range of units derived from or roughly equivalent to the Roman mile, such as the nautical mile (now 1.852 km exactly), the Italian mile (roughly 1.852 km), and the Chinese mile (now 500 m exactly). The Romans divided their mile into 5,000 feet but the greater importance of furlongs in pre-modern England meant that the statute mile was made equivalent to 8 furlongs or 5,280 feet in 1593. This form of the mile then spread to the British-colonized nations who continue to employ the mile. The US Geological Survey now employs the metre for official purposes but legacy data from its 1927 geodetic datum has meant that a separate US survey mile (6336/3937 km) continues to see some use
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Albinus Of Angers
Saint Albinus of Angers
Angers
(French: Saint-Aubin) (c. 470 – March 1, 550) was a French abbot and bishop. Born to a noble Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
family at Vannes, Brittany, St. Albinus was a monk and from 504 C.E. Abbot
Abbot
of Tintillac (which no longer stands; its location has not been satisfactorily identified). His reputation spread during the twenty-five years in which he served as abbot. In 529, St
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Population Without Double Counting
Population without double counting is an English translation of the French phrase Population sans doubles comptes. In France, for the purposes of the census, the INSEE has defined several population indicators that allow people who live in more than one place to be counted in each place, to study and keep count of population movement. So each commune in France
France
does not have only one figure for the population, but several; for example students may be counted both where they study and where they live when not studying
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Siege
A siege is a military blockade of a city, or fortress, with the intent of conquering by attrition, or a well-prepared assault. This derives from sedere, Latin
Latin
for "to sit".[1] Siege
Siege
warfare is a form of constant, low-intensity conflict characterized by one party holding a strong, static, defensive position. Consequently, an opportunity for negotiation between combatants is not uncommon, as proximity and fluctuating advantage can encourage diplomacy. A siege occurs when an attacker encounters a city or fortress that cannot be easily taken by a quick assault, and which refuses to surrender. Sieges involve surrounding the target to block the provision of supplies and the reinforcement or escape of troops (a tactic known as "investment"[2])
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Duke Of Burgundy
Dukedom of BurgundyCreation date 880Peerage Peerage of FranceFirst holder Richard the JusticiarLast holder Charles the Bold
Charles the Bold
(fief) Louis of France (courtesy title)Status ExtinctExtinction date 5 January 1477 (fief) 22 March 1761 (courtesy title)Seat(s) Château de Germolles Hôtel de Bourgogne Palace of the Dukes of Burgundy Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy
(French: duc de Bourgogne) was a title borne by the rulers of the Duchy of Burgundy, a small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians
Burgundians
west of river Saône
Saône
which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Bald's kingdom of West Franks. Under the Ancien Régime, the Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy
was the premier lay peer of the kingdom of France. Beginning with Robert II of France, the title was held by the Capetians, the French royal family
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Jeanne Hachette
Hachette may refer to: Hachette (surname) Hachette (publisher), a French publisher, the imprint of Lagardère Publishing Hachette Book Group USA, the American subsidiary Hachette Distribution Services, the distribution armSee also[edit]
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High Middle Ages
Central Europe Guelf, Hohenstaufen, and Ascanian
Ascanian
domains in Germany about 1176         Duchy of Saxony          Margravate of Brandenburg          Duchy of Franconia         Duchy of Swabia          Duchy of BavariaThe High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or High Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from AD 1000 to 1250
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