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Bearasaigh
Bearasaigh
Bearasaigh
or Bearasay (and sometimes Berisay) is an islet in outer Loch Ròg, Lewis, Scotland. During the late 16th and early 17th centuries it was used as a pirates' hideout and the remains of various buildings from that period still exist. In the modern era its cliffs are used for rock-climbing.Contents1 Geography 2 Pirate's redoubt 3 Ruins 4 Sporting activities 5 Notes 6 ReferencesGeography[edit] Bearasaigh
Bearasaigh
lies north west of Great Bernera, Little Bernera
Little Bernera
and Flodaigh (flat island) and south of Seanna Chnoc
Seanna Chnoc
(old hill). Although steep-sided the isle has a relatively flat summit
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Scottish Gaelic Language
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
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Stack (geology)
A stack or sea stack is a geological landform consisting of a steep and often vertical column or columns of rock in the sea near a coast, formed by wave erosion.[1] Stacks are formed over time by wind and water, processes of coastal geomorphology.[2] They are formed when part of a headland is eroded by hydraulic action, which is the force of the sea or water crashing against the rock. The force of the water weakens cracks in the headland, causing them to later collapse, forming free-standing stacks and even a small island. Without the constant presence of water, stacks also form when a natural arch collapses under gravity, due to sub-aerial processes like wind erosion. Erosion
Erosion
causes the arch to collapse, leaving the pillar of hard rock standing away from the coast—the stack. Eventually, erosion will cause the stack to collapse, leaving a stump
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Shetland
Shetland
Shetland
/ˈʃɛtlənd/ (Old Norse: Hjaltland), also called the Shetland
Shetland
Islands, is a subarctic archipelago of Scotland
Scotland
that lies northeast of Great Britain. The islands lie some 80 km (50 mi) to the northeast of Orkney, 168 km (104 mi) from the Scottish mainland and 280 km (170 mi) southeast of the Faroe Islands. They form part of the division between the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west and the North Sea
North Sea
to the east
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Government Of Scotland
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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Hanged
Hanging
Hanging
is the suspension of a person by a noose or ligature around the neck.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
states that hanging in this sense is "specifically to put to death by suspension by the neck", though it formerly also referred to crucifixion and death by impalement in which the body would remain "hanging". Hanging
Hanging
has been a common method of capital punishment since medieval times, and is the official execution method in numerous countries and regions. The first account of execution by hanging was in Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
(Book XXII).[2] In this specialised meaning of the common word hang, the past and past participle is hanged[3] instead of hung. Hanging
Hanging
is also a common method of suicide in which a person applies a ligature to the neck and brings about unconsciousness and then death by suspension
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Leith
Leith
Leith
(/liːθ/; Scottish Gaelic: Lìte) is an area to the north of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, at the mouth of the Water of Leith. The earliest surviving historical references are in the royal charter authorising the construction of Holyrood Abbey
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Harris, Outer Hebrides
Harris (Scottish Gaelic:  Na Hearadh (help·info), pronounced [nə ˈhɛɾəɣ]) is the southern and more mountainous part of Lewis
Lewis
and Harris, the largest island in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Although not an island itself, Harris is often referred to as the Isle of Harris, which is the former postal county and the current post town for Royal Mail postcodes starting HS3 or HS5; see HS postcode area. A person from Harris is known as a Hearach. Rockall, an uninhabited islet, is deemed to be part of the parish
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Roderick Macleod Of Macleod
Roderick
Roderick
(from Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
*Hrōþirīks, from hrōþ "glory" + rīks "ruler") is a Germanic name, recorded from the 8th century onward.[1] Its Old High German
Old High German
forms are Hrodric, Chrodericus, Hroderich, Roderich, Ruodrich (etc.); in Old English language
Old English language
it appears as Hrēðrīc or Hroðrīc, and in Old Norse
Old Norse
as Hrǿríkʀ ( Old East Norse
Old East Norse
Hrø̄rīkʀ, Rø̄rīkʀ, Old West Norse
Old West Norse
as Hrœrekr, Rœrekr). In the 12th-century Primary chronicle, the name is reflected as Рюрикъ, i.e. Rurik. In Spanish and Portuguese, it was rendered as Rodrigo, or in its short form, Ruy, Rui, or Ruiz, and in Galician, the name is Roi
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King James VI Of Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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High Treason
Treason
Treason
is criminal disloyalty. Historically, in common law countries, high treason is treason against the state. It was differentiated from petty treason (or petit treason), which was treason against a lesser lawful superior (such as a servant killing his master). Petty treason was restricted to cases of homicide in 1351, and came to be considered a more serious degree of murder. As common law jurisdictions around the world abolished petty treason, the concept of high treason gradually faded, and today use of the word "treason" generally refers to what was historically known as high treason. In Canadian law, however, there are still two separate offences of treason and high treason, but both of these, in fact, fall in the historical category of high treason.[1] In Canada, the main difference in law between treason and high treason depends on whether the nation is at war
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Norsemen
Norsemen
Norsemen
are a group of Germanic people
Germanic people
who inhabited Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and spoke what is now called the Old Norse
Old Norse
language between c. 800 AD and c. 1300 AD. The language belongs to the North Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is the predecessor of the modern Germanic languages of Scandinavia. Norseman means "man from the North" and applied primarily to Old Norse-speaking tribes living in southern and central Scandinavia
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Rock Climbing
Rock climbing
Rock climbing
is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls. The goal is to reach the summit of a formation or the endpoint of a usually pre-defined route without falling. Due to the length and extended endurance required and because accidents are more likely to happen on the descent than the ascent, rock climbers do not usually climb back down the route. It is very rare for a climber to downclimb, especially on the larger multiple pitches (class III- IV and /or multi-day grades IV-VI climbs). Professional rock climbing competitions have the objectives of either completing the route in the quickest possible time or attaining the farthest point on an increasingly difficult route. Scrambling, another activity involving the scaling of hills and similar formations, is similar to rock climbing
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Tyrolean Traverse
A Tyrolean traverse
Tyrolean traverse
is a method of crossing through free space between two high points on a rope without a hanging cart or cart equivalent. This is used in a range of mountaineering activities: rock climbing, technical tree climbing, caving, water crossings and mountain rescue. A zip-line is in essence a Tyrolean traverse
Tyrolean traverse
which is traveled down quickly with the assistance of gravity. Several sources claim that the name comes from the Tyrolean Alps, where climbers are said to have developed the system in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.[1][2][3] In rock climbing a Tyrolean traverse
Tyrolean traverse
is most often used to return to the main part of a wall after climbing a detached pillar. Lost Arrow Spire, a detached pillar in Yosemite Valley, is often abseiled using a dramatic Tyrolean traverse
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Anstruther
Anstruther
Anstruther
/ˈænstrəðər/ ( listen) (Scots: Ainster /ˈeɪnstər/ ( listen) or /ˈɐ̟nstər/;[4] Scottish Gaelic: Ànsruthair) is a small town in Fife, Scotland, nine miles south-southeast of St. Andrews. The two halves of the town are divided by a stream, the Dreel Burn. With a population of 3,500, it is the largest community on the Firth of Forth's north-shore coastline known as East Neuk. To the east, it merges with the village of Cellardyke.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 Twinning3 Notable inhabitants 4 Politics 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] Founded as a fishing village, Anstruther
Anstruther
is home to the Scottish Fisheries Museum. Its main industry is now tourism, although other small scale manufacturing and service industries continue.[citation needed] Recreational vessels are now moored in the harbour, and a golf course is situated near the town
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Kayak
A kayak is a small, narrow watercraft which is propelled by means of a double-bladed paddle. The word kayak originates from the Greenlandic word qajaq (IPA: [qajaq]). The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray and makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler. Inuit
Inuit
seal hunter in a kayak, armed with a harpoonInterior 360 degree photosphere of a kayak at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
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