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Bearasaigh
BEARASAIGH or BEARASAY (and sometimes Berisay) is an islet in outer Loch Ròg , Lewis
Lewis
, Scotland. During the late 16th and early 17th centuries it was used as a pirates' hideout and the remains of various buildings from that period still exist. In the modern era its cliffs are used for rock-climbing. CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 Pirate\'s redoubt * 3 Ruins * 4 Sporting activities * 5 Notes * 6 References GEOGRAPHY Bearasaigh
Bearasaigh
lies north west of Great Bernera , Little Bernera and Flodaigh (flat island) and south of Seanna Chnoc (old hill). Although steep-sided the isle has a relatively flat summit. Immediately to the west is Stac an Tùill and there is a sea cave to the north east. The deep sea channel between Bearasaigh
Bearasaigh
and Seanna Chnoc is said to be "troublesome" when the wind opposes the tidal current
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King James VI Of Scotland
JAMES VI AND I (James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as JAMES VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as JAMES I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states , with their own parliaments, judiciary, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union . James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots
Mary, Queen of Scots
, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Ireland , positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother Mary was compelled to abdicate in his favour. Four different regents governed during his minority, which ended officially in 1578, though he did not gain full control of his government until 1583
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Roderick Macleod Of Macleod
MACLEOD and MCLEOD /məˈklaʊd/ are surnames in the English language . Generally, the names are considered to be Anglicised forms of the Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
MacLeòid , meaning "son of Leòd". However, in some cases the names can also be Anglicised forms of the Irish Mac Leóid . Another origin for the name, according to late 19th-century Irish genealogist John O\'Hart , is from the Irish surname MacElligott or from the Irish Mac Giolla Mochadha (commonly Anglicised as MacGillicudy). One of the earliest occurrences of the surname is of Gillandres MacLeod, in 1227. There are two recognised Scottish clans with the surname: Clan MacLeod of Harris and Skye
Skye
, and Clan MacLeod of Lewis and Raasay
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High Treason
Treason
Treason
is criminal disloyalty. Historically, in common law countries, HIGH TREASON is treason against the state. It was differentiated from petty treason (or petit treason), which was treason against a lesser lawful superior (such as a servant killing his master). Petty treason was restricted to cases of homicide in 1351, and came to be considered a more serious degree of murder . As common law jurisdictions around the world abolished petty treason, the concept of high treason gradually faded, and today use of the word "treason" generally refers to what was historically known as high treason. In Canadian law , however, there are still two separate offences of treason and high treason, but both of these, in fact, fall in the historical category of high treason. In Canada, the main difference in law between treason and high treason depends on whether the nation is at war
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Norsemen
NORSEMEN are the group of people who spoke what is now called the Old Norse language between the 8th and 11th centuries. The language belongs to the North Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
, and is the earlier form of modern Scandinavian languages . Norseman means "man from the North" and applied primarily to Old Norse-speaking tribes living in southern and central Scandinavia
Scandinavia
. In history, "Norse" or "Norseman" could be any person from Scandinavia, even though Norway
Norway
, Denmark
Denmark
and Sweden
Sweden
were different sets of people by the Middle Ages
Middle Ages

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Rock Climbing
ROCK CLIMBING is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls . The goal is to reach the summit of a formation or the endpoint of a usually pre-defined route without falling. Due to the length and extended endurance required and because accidents are more likely to happen on the descent than the ascent, rock climbers do not usually climb back down the route. It is very rare for a climber to downclimb, especially on the larger multiple pitches (class III- IV and /or multi-day grades IV-VI climbs). Professional rock climbing competitions have the objectives of either completing the route in the quickest possible time or attaining the farthest point on an increasingly difficult route. Scrambling , another activity involving the scaling of hills and similar formations, is similar to rock climbing
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Harris, Outer Hebrides
HARRIS ( Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Na Hearadh (help ·info ), pronounced ) is the southern and more mountainous part of Lewis and Harris
Lewis and Harris
, the largest island in the Outer Hebrides , Scotland
Scotland
. Although not an island itself, Harris is often referred to as the Isle of Harris, which is the former postal county and the current post town for Royal Mail postcodes starting HS3 or HS5; see HS postcode area . A person from Harris is known as a Hearach. Rockall , an uninhabited islet is deemed to be part of the parish. It is 230 miles (370 km) west of North Uist
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Leith
LEITH /ˈliːθ/ ; Scottish Gaelic : Lìte; is an area to the north of the city of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
, Scotland, at the mouth of the Water of Leith
Leith
. The earliest surviving historical references are in the royal charter authorising the construction of Holyrood Abbey
Holyrood Abbey
in 1128. The medieval settlements of Leith
Leith
had grown into a burgh by 1833, and the burgh was merged into Edinburgh
Edinburgh
in 1920. Historically part of the county of Midlothian
Midlothian
, Leith
Leith
is sited on the coast of the Firth of Forth
Firth of Forth
and lies within the council area of the City of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
. The port remains one of its most valuable enterprises, handling over 1.5 million tonnes of cargo a year in 2003
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Flanders
FLANDERS (Dutch : Vlaanderen ( listen ), French : Flandre , German : Flandern) is the Dutch -speaking northern portion of Belgium
Belgium
, although there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history. It is one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium
Belgium
. The demonym associated with Flanders
Flanders
is Fleming , while the corresponding adjective is Flemish
Flemish
. The official capital of Flanders
Flanders
is Brussels
Brussels
, although Brussels
Brussels
itself has an independent regional government, and the government of Flanders
Flanders
only oversees some cultural aspects of Brussels
Brussels
life
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Shetland
SHETLAND /ˈʃɛtlənd/ , also called the SHETLAND ISLANDS, is a subarctic archipelago that lies northeast of the island of Great Britain and forms part of Scotland
Scotland
, United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. The islands lie some 80 km (50 mi) to the northeast of Orkney
Orkney
and 280 km (170 mi) southeast of the Faroe Islands
Faroe Islands
. They form part of the division between the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west and the North Sea
North Sea
to the east. The total area is 1,466 km2 (566 sq mi), and the population totalled 23,210 in 2011
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Government Of Scotland
The SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT ( Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Riaghaltas na h-Alba; Scots : Scots Govrenment) is Scotland's government . The government was established in 1999 as the Scottish Executive under section 44(1) of the Scotland
Scotland
Act 1998 , which created a devolved administration for Scotland
Scotland
in line with the result of the 1997 referendum on Scottish devolution . It was formally renamed in 2012 to the Scottish Government by section 12(1) of the Scotland
Scotland
Act 2012 . The government consists of cabinet secretaries, who attend cabinet meetings, and ministers, who do not. It is led by the first minister , who selects the cabinet secretaries and ministers with approval of parliament
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Hanged
HANGING is the suspension of a person by a noose or ligature around the neck. The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
states that hanging in this sense is "specifically to put to death by suspension by the neck", though it formerly also referred to crucifixion and death by impalement in which the body would remain "hanging". Hanging
Hanging
has been a common method of capital punishment since medieval times, and is the official execution method in numerous countries and regions. The first account of execution by hanging was in Homer
Homer
's Odyssey
Odyssey
(Book XXII). In this specialised meaning of the common word hang, the past and past participle is hanged instead of hung. Hanging
Hanging
is also a common method of suicide in which a person applies a ligature to the neck and brings about unconsciousness and then death by suspension
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Stack (geology)
A STACK or SEA STACK is a geological landform consisting of a steep and often vertical column or columns of rock in the sea near a coast, formed by wave erosion . Stacks are formed over time by wind and water, processes of coastal geomorphology. They are formed when part of a headland is eroded by hydraulic action , which is the force of the sea or water crashing against the rock. The force of the water weakens cracks in the headland, causing them to later collapse, forming free-standing stacks and even a small island. Without the constant presence of water, stacks also form when a natural arch collapses under gravity , due to sub-aerial processes like wind erosion . Erosion
Erosion
causes the arch to collapse, leaving the pillar of hard rock standing away from the coast—the stack. Eventually, erosion will cause the stack to collapse, leaving a stump. Stacks can provide important nesting locations for seabirds , and many are popular for rock climbing
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Tyrolean Traverse
A TYROLEAN TRAVERSE is a method of crossing through free space between two high points on a rope without a hanging cart or cart equivalent. This is used in a range of mountaineering activities: rock climbing , technical tree climbing , caving , water crossings and mountain rescue . A zip-line is in essence a Tyrolean traverse which is traveled down quickly with the assistance of gravity. Several sources claim that the name comes from the Tyrolean Alps, where climbers are said to have developed the system in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In rock climbing a Tyrolean traverse is most often used to return to the main part of a wall after climbing a detached pillar. Lost Arrow Spire , a detached pillar in Yosemite Valley, is often abseiled using a dramatic Tyrolean traverse. There are many ways to anchor the line at the two high points but the significant feature is that there is a line strung between them
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Paisley, Renfrewshire
PAISLEY (/ˈpeɪzli/ ; Scottish Gaelic : Pàislig ) is the largest town in the historic county of Renfrewshire in the west central Lowlands of Scotland and serves as the administrative centre for the Renfrewshire council area . The town is situated on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes , straddling the banks of the White Cart Water , a tributary of the River Clyde . The town, a former burgh , forms part of the contiguous Greater Glasgow urban area; Glasgow city centre is 7 miles (11 km) to the east. The town came to prominence with the establishment of Paisley Abbey in the 12th century, an important religious hub which formerly had control over the other churches in the local area. It is often cited as "Scotland's largest town", as it does not have city status
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Inverness
INVERNESS (/ɪnvərˈnɛs/ ( listen ); from the Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Inbhir Nis , meaning "Mouth of the River Ness
River Ness
") is a city in the Scottish Highlands . It is the administrative centre for the Highland council area , and is regarded as the capital of the Highlands. Inverness
Inverness
lies near two important battle sites: the 11th-century battle of Blàr nam Fèinne against Norway which took place on The Aird and the 18th-century Battle of Culloden
Battle of Culloden
which took place on Culloden Moor . It is the northernmost city in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and lies within the Great Glen (Gleann Mòr) at its north-eastern extremity where the River Ness
River Ness
enters the Moray Firth
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