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Bay Of Pomerania Nature Reserve
The Bay of Pomerania
Bay of Pomerania
Nature Reserve (German: Naturschutzgebiet Pommersche Bucht) is a coastal region east of the German island of Rügen
Rügen
in Germany's exclusive economic zone and the continental shelf of the Baltic Sea. It was created on 15 September 2005 by the Red-Green federal government and, together with the Sylt Outer Reef Nature Reserve (Naturschutzgebiet Sylter Außenriff), is one of the few nature reserves established by the federation.[1]Contents1 Protected area 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksProtected area[edit] The area is part of a European bird reserve, i.e. a Special
Special
Protection Area under the Habitats Directive
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Marine Protected Area
Marine protected areas (MPA) are protected areas of seas, oceans, estuaries or large lakes. These marine areas can come in many forms ranging from wildlife refuges to research facilities.[2] MPAs restrict human activity for a conservation purpose, typically to protect natural or cultural resources.[3] Such marine resources are protected by local, state, territorial, native, regional, national, or international authorities and differ substantially among and between nations. This variation includes different limitations on development, fishing practices, fishing seasons and catch limits, moorings and bans on removing or disrupting marine life
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Velvet Scoter
The velvet scoter (Melanitta fusca), also called a velvet duck,[2] is a large sea duck, which breeds over the far north of Europe and Asia west of the Yenisey basin.The genus name is derived from Ancient Greek melas "black" and netta "duck". The species name is from the Latin fuscus "dusky brown".[3] A small, isolated population nests in eastern Turkey. The East Siberian and North American white-winged scoter is sometimes considered conspecific with the velvet scoter, and its two constituent subspecies are then known as M. f. stejnegeri and M. f. deglandi. Velvet and white-winged scoter, along with the surf scoter, are placed in the subgenus Melanitta, distinct from the subgenus Oidemia, black scoter and common scoters.Eggs, Collection Museum WiesbadenIt winters farther south in temperate zones, Europe as far south as Great Britain, and on the Black and Caspian Sea. Small numbers reach France and northern Spain. It forms large flocks on suitable coastal waters
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Little Gull
Larus
Larus
minutus Pallas, 1776The little gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus or Larus
Larus
minutus), is a small gull that breeds in northern Europe
Europe
and Asia. The genus name Hydrocoloeus is from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
hudro, "water", and koloios, a sort of web-footed bird. The specific minutus is Latin
Latin
for "small".[2] It also has small colonies in parts of southern Canada
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Common Tern
Sterna
Sterna
fluviatilis Naumann, 1839The common tern[2] ( Sterna
Sterna
hirundo) is a seabird in the family Laridae. This bird has a circumpolar distribution, its four subspecies breeding in temperate and subarctic regions of Europe, Asia and North America. It is strongly migratory, wintering in coastal tropical and subtropical regions. Breeding adults have light grey upperparts, white to very light grey underparts, a black cap, orange-red legs, and a narrow pointed bill. Depending on the subspecies, the bill may be mostly red with a black tip or all black
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Arctic Tern
Sterna
Sterna
portlandica Sterna
Sterna
pikeiThe Arctic
Arctic
tern ( Sterna
Sterna
paradisaea) is a tern in the family Laridae. This bird has a circumpolar breeding distribution covering the Arctic and sub- Arctic
Arctic
regions of Europe, Asia, and North America
North America
(as far south as Brittany and Massachusetts). The species is strongly migratory, seeing two summers each year as it migrates along a convoluted route from its northern breeding grounds to the Antarctic coast for the southern summer and back again about six months later. Recent studies have shown average annual roundtrip lengths of about 70,900 km (44,100 mi) for birds nesting in Iceland
Iceland
and Greenland[3] and c
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Red-necked Grebe
Podiceps
Podiceps
griseigena (Lapsus)The red-necked grebe ( Podiceps
Podiceps
grisegena) is a migratory aquatic bird found in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Its wintering habitat is largely restricted to calm waters just beyond the waves around ocean coasts, although some birds may winter on large lakes. Grebes prefer shallow bodies of fresh water such as lakes, marshes or fish-ponds as breeding sites. The red-necked grebe is a nondescript dusky-grey bird in winter. During the breeding season, it acquires the distinctive red neck plumage, black cap and contrasting pale grey face from which its name was derived. It also has an elaborate courtship display and a variety of loud mating calls. Once paired, it builds a nest from water plants on top of floating vegetation in a shallow lake or bog. Like all grebes, the Red-necked is a good swimmer, a particularly swift diver, and responds to danger by diving rather than flying
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Long-tailed Duck
Harelda hyemalisThe long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis), once known as oldsquaw, is a medium-sized sea duck. It is the only living member of its genus, Clangula. This was formerly used for the goldeneyes, with the long-tailed duck being placed in Harelda, but the latter is the type species of the genus.[2] An undescribed congener is known from the Middle Miocene Sajóvölgyi Formation (Late Badenian, 13–12 Mya) of Mátraszőlős, Hungary.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Name 4 Status 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]FemaleEgg, Collection Museum WiesbadenMother and six ducklings in IcelandAdults have white underparts, though the rest of the plumage goes through a complex moulting process. The male has a long pointed tail (10 to 15 cm (3.9 to 5.9 in) long) and a dark grey bill crossed by a pink band. In winter, the male has a dark cheek patch on a mainly white head and neck, a dark breast and mostly white body
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Common Scoter
The common scoter (Melanitta nigra) is a large sea duck, 43–54 cm (17–21 in) in length, which breeds over the far north of Europe
Europe
and Asia
Asia
east to the Olenyok River. The genus name is derived from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
melas, "black", and netta, "duck". The species name is from Latin
Latin
niger "shining black".[2] The black scoter (M. americana) of North America and eastern Siberia is sometimes considered a subspecies of M. nigra.Contents1 Description1.1 Vocalisations2 Ecology 3 UK population and current issues 4 Scoters and Meatless Fridays in France 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] It is characterised by its bulky shape and large bill. The male is all black with a bulbous bill which shows some yellow coloration around the nostrils
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Common Gull
The common gull ( Larus
Larus
canus) is a medium-sized gull which breeds in northern Asia, northern Europe
Europe
and northwestern North America. The North American subspecies is commonly referred to as the mew gull, although that name is also used by some authorities for the whole species.[2] It migrates further south in winter.[3] There are differing accounts as to how the species acquired its vernacular name (see Etymology section below).Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Ecology 4 Vagrancy 5 Etymology 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit]Common Gulls, Larus
Larus
canus, in flightWinter plumageEggs, Collection Museum WiesbadenAdult common gulls are 40–46 cm (16–18 in) long, noticeably smaller than the herring gull and slightly smaller than the ring-billed gull
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Black-throated Loon
The black-throated loon (Gavia arctica), also known as the Arctic loon and the black-throated diver, is a migratory aquatic bird found in the northern hemisphere, primarily breeding in freshwater lakes in northern Europe and Asia. It winters along sheltered, ice-free coasts of the north-east Atlantic Ocean and the eastern and western Pacific Ocean. This loon was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. It has two subspecies. It was previously considered to be the same species as the Pacific loon, of which it is traditionally considered to be a sister species, although this is debated. In a study that used mitochondrial and nuclear intron DNA, the black-throated loon was found to be sister to a clade consisting of the Pacific loon and two sister species, the common loon and the yellow-billed loon. The black-throated loon measures about 70 cm (28 in) in length and can weigh anywhere from 1.3 to 3.4 kilograms (2.9 to 7.5 lb)
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Lesser Black-backed Gull
The lesser black-backed gull ( Larus
Larus
fuscus) is a large gull that breeds on the Atlantic coasts of Europe. It is migratory, wintering from the British Isles
British Isles
south to West Africa. It is a regular winter visitor to the east coast of North America, probably from the breeding population in Iceland.Contents1 Taxonomy1.1 Subspecies2 Description 3 Breeding 4 Feeding 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksTaxonomy[edit] The lesser black-backed gull was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th-century work, Systema Naturae, and it still bears its original name of Larus
Larus
fuscus.[2] The scientific name is from Latin. Larus
Larus
appears to have referred to a gull or other large seabird, and fuscus meant black or brown.[3] Subspecies[edit] There are five subspecies:L. f
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Common Guillemot
Guillemots is the common name for several species of seabird in the auk family (part of the order Charadriiformes). In British use, the term comprises two genera: Uria
Uria
and Cepphus. In North America
North America
the Uria species are called "murres" and only the Cepphus
Cepphus
species are called "guillemots". This word of French origin apparently derives from a form of the name William, cf. French: Guillaume.[1] The two living species of Uria, together with the razorbill, dovekie and the extinct great auk, make up the tribe Alcini. They have distinctly white bellies, thicker and longer bills than Cepphus, and form very dense colonies on cliffs during the reproductive season. The three living species of Cepphus
Cepphus
form a tribe of their own: Cepphini
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Razorbill
The razorbill (Alca torda) is a colonial seabird that comes to land only to breed. This agile bird chooses one partner for life; females lay one egg per year. Razorbills nest along coastal cliffs in enclosed or slightly exposed crevices. The parents spend equal amounts of time incubating. Once the chick has hatched, the parents take turns foraging for their young and sometimes fly long distances before finding prey. The razorbill is primarily black with a white underside. The male and female are identical in plumage; however, males are generally larger than females. In 1918, the razorbill was protected in the United States by the Migratory Bird
Bird
Treaty Act
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Black Guillemot
The black guillemot or tystie ( Cepphus
Cepphus
grylle) is a medium-sized alcid. The genus name Cepphus
Cepphus
is from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
kepphos, a pale waterbird mentioned by Greek authors including Aristotle. The species name grylle was the local dialect name for this bird in Gotland
Gotland
at the time of Linnaeus's visit there in 1741.[2] The English word "guillemot" is from French guillemot probably derived from Guillaume, "William".[3] Adult birds have black bodies with a white wing patch, a thin dark bill, and red legs and feet
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Bay Of Pomerania
Pomerania
Pomerania
(Polish: Pomorze; German, Low German
Low German
and Swedish: Pommern; Kashubian: Pòmòrskô) is a historical region on the southern shore of the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
in Central Europe, split between Germany
Germany
and Poland. The name derives from the Slavic po more, meaning "by the sea".[1] Pomerania
Pomerania
stretches roughly from the Recknitz
Recknitz
and Trebel rivers in the west to the Vistula
Vistula
river in the east.[2][3] The largest Pomeranian islands are Rügen, Usedom/Uznam and Wolin. The largest Pomeranian city is Gdańsk, or, when using a narrower definition of the region, Szczecin. Outside its urban areas, Pomerania is characterized by farmland, dotted with numerous lakes, forests, and towns
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