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Bay Bolton
Bay Bolton
Bay Bolton
or Brown Lusty (1705–1736) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse who won Queen Anne's Gold Cup as a five-year-old in 1710. After retiring from racing he became a successful sire for the Charles Paulet, 2nd Duke of Bolton, and his son Charles Powlett, 3rd Duke of Bolton, was Champion sire seven times.Bay Bolton, a horse belonging to his grace the Duke of Bolton, engraved by Richard Parr, 1739.Contents1 Background 2 Racing career 3 Stud career 4 Pedigree 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Bay Bolton
Bay Bolton
(originally called Brown Lusty) was a brown or bay colt foaled in 1705
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Stallion (horse)
A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. Temperament varies widely based on genetics, and training, but because of their instincts as herd animals, they may be prone to aggressive behavior, particularly toward other stallions, and thus require careful management by knowledgeable handlers
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Inbreeding
Inbreeding
Inbreeding
is the production of offspring from the mating or breeding of individuals or organisms that are closely related genetically.[2] By analogy, the term is used in human reproduction, but more commonly refers to the genetic disorders and other consequences that may arise from incestuous sexual relationships and consanguinity. Inbreeding
Inbreeding
results in homozygosity, which can increase the chances of offspring being affected by recessive or deleterious traits.[3] This generally leads to a decreased biological fitness of a population[4][5] (called inbreeding depression), which is its ability to survive and reproduce. An individual who inherits such deleterious traits is referred to as inbred
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North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county (or shire county) and larger ceremonial county in England. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. Created by the Local Government Act 1972,[2] it covers an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi), making it the largest county in England. The majority of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors lie within North Yorkshire's boundaries, and around 40% of the county is covered by National Parks
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Charles Seymour, 6th Duke Of Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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Newmarket, Suffolk
Newmarket is a market town in the English county of Suffolk, approximately 65 miles (105 kilometres) north of London. It is generally considered the birthplace and global centre of thoroughbred horse racing[2] and a potential World Heritage Site.[3] It is a major local business cluster, with annual investment rivalling that of the Cambridge
Cambridge
Science Park, the other major cluster in the region.[4] It is the largest racehorse training centre in Britain,[5] the largest racehorse breeding centre in the country, home to most major British horseracing institutions, and a key global centre for horse health. Two Classic races, and an additional three British Champions Series races are held at Newmarket every year. The town has been a centre for British royalty since James I, and was also a home to Charles I, Charles II and many monarchs since
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Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
(/ˈbʌkɪŋəmʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/), abbreviated Bucks,[1] is a county in South East England
England
which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the south, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the west, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north east and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east. Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
is one of the home counties and towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham
Chesham
and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Mile
The mile is an English unit of length of linear measure equal to 5,280 feet, or 1,760 yards, and standardised as exactly 1,609.344 metres by international agreement in 1959. With qualifiers, "mile" is also used to describe or translate a wide range of units derived from or roughly equivalent to the Roman mile, such as the nautical mile (now 1.852 km exactly), the Italian mile (roughly 1.852 km), and the Chinese mile (now 500 m exactly). The Romans divided their mile into 5,000 feet but the greater importance of furlongs in pre-modern England meant that the statute mile was made equivalent to 8 furlongs or 5,280 feet in 1593. This form of the mile then spread to the British-colonized nations who continue to employ the mile. The US Geological Survey now employs the metre for official purposes but legacy data from its 1927 geodetic datum has meant that a separate US survey mile (6336/3937 km) continues to see some use
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Middleham
Middleham
Middleham
/ˈmɪdləm, -dələm/[2] is a small market town and civil parish in the Richmondshire
Richmondshire
district of North Yorkshire, England. It lies in Wensleydale, in the Yorkshire Dales, on the north-facing side of the valley just above the junction of the River Ure
River Ure
and River Cover. There has been a settlement there since Roman times. It was recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
as "Medelai"
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York Racecourse
York
York
Racecourse is a horse racing venue in York, North Yorkshire, England. It is the third biggest racecourse in Britain in terms of total prize money offered, and second behind Ascot in prize money offered per meeting.[1] It attracts around 350,000 racegoers per year[2] and stages three of the UK's 31 Group One races – the Juddmonte International Stakes, the Nunthorpe Stakes and the Yorkshire Oaks.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Facilities 4 Layout 5 Important meetings 6 Awards 7 Records 8 Notable races 9 References 10 Bibliography 11 External linksLocation[edit] The course is located in the south-west of the city, next to the former Terry's
Terry's
of York
York
factory, The Chocolate Works
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John Wootton
John Wootton
John Wootton
(c. 1682–1764) was an English painter of sporting subjects, battle scenes and landscapes, and illustrator.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 Further reading 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Born in Snitterfield, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
(near Stratford-upon-Avon), he is best remembered as a pioneer in the painting of sporting subjects – together with Peter Tillemans
Peter Tillemans
and James Seymour[1] – and was considered the finest practitioner of the genre in his day. As such, his paintings were very fashionable and were sought after by those among the highest strata of the British society
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Colt (horse)
A colt is a male horse, usually below the age of four years.[1][2] Description[edit] The term "colt" only describes young male horses and is not to be confused with foal, which is a horse of either sex less than one year of age. Similarly, a yearling is a horse of either sex between the ages of one and two. A young female horse is called a filly, and a mare once she is an adult animal. In horse racing, particularly for Thoroughbreds in the United Kingdom, a colt is defined as an uncastrated male from the age of two up to and including the age of four.[3] An adult male horse if left intact is called either a "stallion" or a "horse" (sometimes full horse); if castrated, it is called a gelding. In some cases, particularly informal nomenclature, a gelding under four years is still called a colt
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Stallion
A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. Temperament varies widely based on genetics, and training, but because of their instincts as herd animals, they may be prone to aggressive behavior, particularly toward other stallions, and thus require careful management by knowledgeable handlers
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Horseracing
Horse
Horse
racing is an equestrian performance sport, typically involving two or more horses ridden by jockeys or driven over a set distance for competition. It is one of the most ancient of all sports and its basic premise – to identify which of two or more horses is the fastest over a set course or distance – has remained unchanged since the earliest times.[1] Horse
Horse
races vary widely in format. Often, countries have developed their own particular horse racing traditions
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