HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Battle Of The Wilderness
Inconclusive (Union offensive continued) BELLIGERENTS United States
United States
Confederate States COMMANDERS AND LEADERS Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
George G. Meade Robert E. Lee
Robert E

[...More...]

"Battle Of The Wilderness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Army Of The Potomac
The ARMY OF THE POTOMAC was the principal Union Army
Union Army
in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War
American Civil War
. It was created in July 1861 shortly after the First Battle of Bull Run
First Battle of Bull Run
and was disbanded in June 1865 following the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in April. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Famous units * 2.1 Corps * 3 Commanders * 4 Major battles and campaigns * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links HISTORYThe Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac
was created in 1861, but was then only the size of a corps (relative to the size of Union armies later in the war). Its nucleus was called the ARMY OF NORTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, under Brig. Gen
[...More...]

"Army Of The Potomac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Military Tactics
MILITARY TACTICS are the science and art of organizing a military force, and the techniques for combining and using weapons and military units to engage and defeat an enemy in battle . Changes in philosophy and technology have been reflected in changes to military tactics. In contemporary military science , tactics are the lowest of three planning levels: (i) strategic, (ii) operational, and (iii) tactical. The highest level of planning is strategy : how force is translated into political objectives by bridging the means and ends of war. The intermediate level, operational , the conversion of strategy into tactics, deals with formations of units. In the vernacular, tactical decisions are those made to achieve the greatest immediate value; strategic decisions are those made to achieve the greatest overall value, irrespective of the immediate results of a tactical decision
[...More...]

"Military Tactics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Richmond In The American Civil War
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA , served as the capital of the Confederate States of America for almost the whole of the American Civil War
American Civil War
. Not only was Richmond the seat of political power for the Confederacy, it served as a vital source of munitions , armament, weapons, supplies, and manpower for the Confederate States Army
Confederate States Army
and Confederate States Navy , and as such would have been defended at all costs regardless of its political status. The city was less than 100 miles (160 km) from the Union capital in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
. Due to its symbolic and strategic importance to the Confederate war effort, it was the target of numerous attempts by the Union Army
Union Army
to seize possession of the capital, most notably during the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 and the Overland Campaign
Overland Campaign
of 1864
[...More...]

"Richmond In The American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Attrition Warfare
ATTRITION WARFARE is a military strategy consisting of belligerent attempts to win a war by wearing down the enemy to the point of collapse through continuous losses in personnel and material . The war will usually be won by the side with greater such resources. The word attrition comes from the Latin root atterere to rub against, similar to the "grinding down" of the opponent's forces in attrition warfare. CONTENTS * 1 Strategic considerations * 2 History * 2.1 Other examples * 3 See also * 4 References STRATEGIC CONSIDERATIONSMilitary theorists and strategists have viewed attrition warfare as something to be avoided
[...More...]

"Attrition Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lieutenant General (United States)
In the United States Army , United States Marine Corps , and the United States Air Force , LIEUTENANT GENERAL (abbreviated LTG in the Army, LT GEN in the Air Force, and LTGEN in the Marine Corps) is a three-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-9. Lieutenant general ranks above major general and below general . Lieutenant general is equivalent to the rank of vice admiral in the other uniformed services . CONTENTS * 1 Statutory limits * 2 Appointment and tour length * 3 Retirement * 4 History * 5 Modern use * 6 Famous lieutenant generals * 6.1 Historic * 6.2 World War II * 6.3 1950s through 1980s; Korean War, Vietnam War, Cold War * 6.4 Post-Cold War * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links STATUTORY LIMITS U.S. lieutenant general flags Rank flag of a lieutenant general in the United States Army
[...More...]

"Lieutenant General (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Major General (United States)
In the United States Army
United States Army
, United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps
, and United States Air Force , MAJOR GENERAL is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general . A major general typically commands division -sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. (The higher ranks are temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.) CONTENTS * 1 Statutory limits * 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length * 3 Retirement * 4 History * 5 See also * 6 References STATUTORY LIMITS U.S
[...More...]

"Major General (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brigadier General (United States)
In the United States
United States
Armed Forces , BRIGADIER GENERAL (BG, BRIG GEN, or BGEN) is a one-star general officer with the pay grade of O-7 in the U.S. Army , U.S. Marine Corps , and U.S. Air Force . Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general . The rank of brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Statutory limits * 3 Promotion, appointment and tour length * 4 Retirement * 5 See also * 6 References HISTORYThe rank of brigadier general has existed in the U.S. military since the inception of the Continental Army
Continental Army
in June 1775. To prevent mistakes in recognizing officers, a general order was issued on July 14, 1775, establishing that brigadier generals would wear a ribband, worn across the breast, between coat and waistcoat, pink in color
[...More...]

"Brigadier General (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virginia
VIRGINIA (/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen ); officially the COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America, and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay , which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond ; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2017 is over 8.4 million
[...More...]

"Virginia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Friendly Fire
FRIENDLY FIRE is an attack by a military force on non-enemy, own, allied or neutral, forces while attempting to attack the enemy, either by misidentifying the target as hostile, or due to errors or inaccuracy. Fire not intended to attack the enemy, and deliberate firing on one's own troops for disciplinary reasons, is not called friendly fire. Nor is unintentional harm to non-combatants or structures, which is sometimes referred to as collateral damage . Training accidents and bloodless incidents also do not qualify as friendly fire in terms of casualty reporting. Use of the term "friendly" in a military context for allied personnel or materiel dates from the First World War
First World War
, often for shells falling short. The term friendly fire was originally adopted by the United States military ; S.L.A Marshall used the term in Men Against Fire in 1947
[...More...]

"Friendly Fire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos * " E pluribus unum
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Old Church
The BATTLE OF OLD CHURCH, also known as MATADEQUIN CREEK, was fought on May 30, 1864, as part of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant 's Overland Campaign
Overland Campaign
against Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
's Army of Northern Virginia during the American Civil War
American Civil War
. As the opposing armies faced each other across Totopotomoy Creek , a Union cavalry division under Brig. Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert collided with a cavalry brigade under Brig. Gen. Matthew C. Butler at Matadequin Creek, near the Old Church crossroads. After sharp dismounted fighting, the outnumbered Confederates were driven back to within 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of Old Cold Harbor, which preceded the Union capture of that important crossroads the following day
[...More...]

"Battle Of Old Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Totopotomoy Creek
The BATTLE OF TOTOPOTOMOY CREEK locally /tɪˈpɒtoʊmiː/ ( listen ), also called the BATTLE OF BETHESDA CHURCH, CRUMPS CREEK, SHADY GROVE ROAD, and HANOVERTOWN, was a battle fought in Hanover County, Virginia in May 28–30, 1864, as part of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses Grant 's Overland Campaign
Overland Campaign
against Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
's Army of Northern Virginia . As Grant continued his attempts to maneuver around Lee's right flank and lure him into a general battle in the open, Lee saw an opportunity to attack the advancing V Corps , under Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren with the Second Corps of Lt. Gen. Jubal Early
Jubal Early
. Early's divisions under Maj. Gens. Robert E
[...More...]

"Battle Of Totopotomoy Creek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of The Monongahela
The BATTLE OF THE MONONGAHELA, (also known as the BATTLE OF BRADDOCK\'S FIELD and the BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS), took place on 9 July 1755, at the beginning of the French and Indian War
French and Indian War
, at Braddock\'s Field in what is now Braddock, Pennsylvania , 10 miles (16 km) east of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
. A British force under General Edward Braddock , moving to take Fort Duquesne
Fort Duquesne
, was defeated by a force of French and Canadian troops under Captain Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu with its American Indian allies. The defeat marked the end of the Braddock expedition
Braddock expedition
, by which the British had hoped to capture Fort Duquesne
Fort Duquesne
and gain control of the strategic Ohio Country
Ohio Country

[...More...]

"Battle Of The Monongahela" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Theater Of The American Civil War
The WESTERN THEATER of the American Civil War
American Civil War
encompassed major military operations in the states of Alabama
Alabama
, Georgia , Florida
Florida
, Mississippi
Mississippi
, North Carolina
North Carolina
, Kentucky
Kentucky
, South Carolina
South Carolina
and Tennessee , as well as Louisiana
Louisiana
east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River . Operations on the coasts of these states, except for Mobile Bay , are considered part of the Lower Seaboard Theater . Most other operations east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
are part of the Eastern Theater
[...More...]

"Western Theater Of The American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.