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Battle Of The Wilderness
Inconclusive (Union offensive continued)[2]Belligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leadersUlysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. LeeUnits involvedArmy of the Potomac[3] IX Corps[4]Army of Northern VirginiaStrength124,232 ("present for duty")[5][6] 60–65,000[6]Casualties and losses17,666 (2,246 killed,  12,037 wounded,  3,383 captured/missing)[7][8] 11,033 (1,477 killed,   7,866 wounded,  1,690 captured/missing)[8]v t eOverland CampaignWilderness Spotsylvania Court House Yellow Tavern Meadow Bridge North Anna Wilson's Wharf Haw's Shop Totopotomoy Creek Old Church Cold Harbor Trevilian Station Saint Mary's ChurchThe Battle of the Wilderness, fought May 5–7, 1864, was the first battle of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Virginia
Virginia
Overland Campaign against Gen. Robert E. Lee
Robert E

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Battle Of The Monongahela
The Battle of the Monongahela, (also known as the Battle of Braddock's Field and the Battle of the Wilderness), took place on 9 July 1755, at the beginning of the French and Indian War, at Braddock's Field
Braddock's Field
in what is now Braddock, Pennsylvania, 10 miles (16 km) east of Pittsburgh. A British force under General Edward Braddock, moving to take Fort Duquesne
Fort Duquesne
which was currently under command by the French, was defeated by a force of French and Canadian troops under Captain Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu
Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu
with its American Indian allies. The defeat marked the end of the Braddock expedition, by which the British had hoped to capture Fort Duquesne
Fort Duquesne
and gain control of the strategic Ohio Country
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A. P. Hill
Mexican-American War Seminole Wars American Civil WarThird Battle of Petersburg †Ambrose Powell Hill, Jr. (November 9, 1825 – April 2, 1865) was a Confederate general who was killed in the American Civil War. He is usually referred to as A.P. Hill, to differentiate him from another, unrelated Confederate general, Daniel Harvey Hill. A native Virginian, Hill was a career United States
United States
Army officer who had fought in the Mexican–American War
Mexican–American War
and Seminole Wars
Seminole Wars
prior to joining the Confederacy
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Confederate States Army
1,082,119 total who served[1]464,646 peak in 1863Part of C.S. War DepartmentColors Cadet gray
Cadet gray
     [2]March "Dixie"EngagementsAmerican Indian Wars Cortina Troubles American Civil WarSumter First Manassas Wilson's Creek Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg
Chambersburg
Raid Mississippi
Mississippi
River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Manassas Sharpsburg Hartsville Fredericksburg Murfreesborough Chancellorsville Gettysburg Vicksburg Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Sabine Pass Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg St
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Attrition Warfare
Attrition warfare
Attrition warfare
is a military strategy consisting of belligerent attempts to win a war by wearing down the enemy to the point of collapse through continuous losses in personnel and materiel. The war will usually be won by the side with greater such resources.[1] The word attrition comes from the Latin root atterere to rub against, similar to the "grinding down" of the opponent's forces in attrition warfare.[2]Contents1 Strategic considerations 2 History2.1 Other examples3 See also 4 ReferencesStrategic considerations[edit] Military theorists and strategists have viewed attrition warfare as something to be avoided
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Richmond In The American Civil War
Richmond, Virginia, served as the capital of the Confederate States of America for almost the whole of the American Civil War. Not only was Richmond the seat of political power for the Confederacy, it served as a vital source of munitions, armament, weapons, supplies, and manpower for the Confederate States Army
Confederate States Army
and Confederate States Navy, and as such would have been defended at all costs regardless of its political status. The city was less than 100 miles (160 km) from the Union capital in Washington, D.C.. Due to its symbolic and strategic importance to the Confederate war effort, it was the target of numerous attempts by the Union Army
Union Army
to seize possession of the capital, most notably during the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 and the Overland Campaign
Overland Campaign
of 1864. Its proximity to the fighting would lead to it becoming a center of hospitals and military prisons
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Military Tactics
Military
Military
tactics are the science and art of organizing a military force, and the techniques for combining and using weapons and military units to engage and defeat an enemy in battle.[1] Changes in philosophy and technology have been reflected in changes to military tactics. In contemporary military science, tactics are the lowest of three planning levels: (i) strategic, (ii) operational, and (iii) tactical. The highest level of planning is strategy: how force is translated into political objectives by bridging the means and ends of war. The intermediate level, operational, the conversion of strategy into tactics, deals with formations of units
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V Corps (Union Army)
Corps
Corps
(/kɔːr/; plural corps /kɔːrz/; via French, from the Latin corpus "body") is a term used for several different kinds of organization. Within military terminology a corps may be:an operational formation, sometimes known as a field corps, which consists of two or more divisions, such as the Corps
Corps
d'armée, later known as I Corps
Corps
("First Corps") of Napoleon's Grande Armée); an administrative corps (or mustering) – that is a specialized branch of a military service (such as an artillery corps, a medical corps, or a force of military police) or; in some cases, a distinct service within a national military (such as the United States Marine Corps).These usages often overlap
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Major General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and United States Air Force, major general is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general.[1][Note 1] A major general typically commands division-sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. Higher ranks are technically temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History4.1 U.S. Army 4.2 Confederate States Army 4.3 U.S. Marine Corps 4.4 U.S
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Gouverneur K. Warren
American Civil WarPeninsula Campaign Battle of Fredericksburg Battle of Chancellorsville Battle of Gettysburg Battle of Bristoe Station Overland CampaignBattle of the WildernessSiege of Petersburg Appomattox CampaignBattle of Five ForksGouverneur Kemble Warren (January 8, 1830 – August 8, 1882) was a civil engineer and Union Army general during the American Civil War. He is best remembered for arranging the last-minute defense of Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg and is often referred to as the "Hero of Little Round Top." His subsequent service as a corps commander and his remaining military career were ruined during the Battle of Five Forks, when he was relieved of command of the V Corps by Philip Sheridan, who claimed that Warren had moved too slowly.Contents1 Early life 2 Civil War 3 Postbellum career 4 In memoriam 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Warren was bor
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Second Corps, Army Of Northern Virginia
Northern may refer to the following:Contents1 Geography 2 Schools 3 Companies 4 Other uses 5 See alsoGeography[edit]North, a point in direction Northern (country subdivision), various regions, states, territories, etc. Northern Europe, the northern part or region of Europe Northern Highland, a region of Wisconsin, United States Northern Range, a range of hills in TrinidadSchools[edit]Northern Collegiate Institute and Vocational School (NCIVS), a school in Sarnia, Canada Northern Secondary School (other), the name of several high schools in Canada Northern University (other), various institutionsCompanies[edit]Northern Bank, commercial bank in Northern Ireland Northern Foods, based in Leeds, England Northern Rail, a former train operating company in northern England Northern Railway of Canada, a defunct railway in Ontario Northern Records, a Southern California independent record label Northern Store, a food and g
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Richard S. Ewell
Mexican-American WarBattle of Contreras Battle of Churubusco Apache
Apache
WarsBonneville ExpeditionAmerican Civil WarFirst Battle of Bull Run Valley Campaign Seven Days Battles Battle of Cedar Mountain Second Battle of Bull Run Second Battle of Winchester Battle of Gettysburg Battle of the Wilderness Battle of Spotsylvania Court House Battle of Sayler's CreekRelations Benjamin S. Ewell
Benjamin S. Ewell
(brother) Benjamin Stoddert
Benjamin Stoddert
(grandfather)Richard Stoddert Ewell (February 8, 1817 – January 25, 1872) was a career United States
United States
Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. He achieved fame as a senior commander under Stonewall Jackson
Stonewall Jackson
and Robert E. Lee
Robert E

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Third Corps, Army Of Northern Virginia
Civil WarGettysburg Wilderness Spotsylvania Cold Harbor Petersburg AppomattoxCommandersCommanders Ambrose P. Hill † Henry Heth Richard Anderson Jubal EarlyThe Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia was a unit of the Provisional Army of the Confederate States.Contents1 Formation 2 1863 3 1864 4 1865 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further readingFormation[edit]A. P. HillAfter the death of Lt. General Thomas J. Jackson at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Robert E. Lee reorganized his army from two infantry corps into three corps, giving command of the new Third Corps to A. P. Hill. For Hill's new corps, Lee assigned Hill's old "Light Division", commanded by Major General William Dorsey Pender, from the Second Corps and Richard H. Anderson's division from James Longstreet's First Corps
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Brigadier General (United States)
In the United States Armed Forces, brigadier general (BG, BGen, or Brig Gen) is a one-star general officer with the pay grade of O-7 in the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force. Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general. The rank of brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services (the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, as both Armed Forces and Uniformed Services; and the Public Health Service and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, as Uniformed Services). The NATO
NATO
equivalent is OF-6.Contents1 History 2 Statutory limits 3 Promotion, appointment and tour length 4 Retirement 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The rank of brigadier general has existed in the U.S. military since the inception of the Continental Army
Continental Army
in June 1775
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Lieutenant General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Air Force, lieutenant general (abbreviated LTG in the Army, Lt Gen in the Air Force, and LtGen in the Marine Corps) is a three-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-9. Lieutenant general ranks above major general and below general. Lieutenant general
Lieutenant general
is equivalent to the rank of vice admiral in the other uniformed services.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Appointment and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History 5 Modern use 6 Famous lieutenant generals6.1 Historic 6.2 World War II 6.3 1950s through 1980s; Korean War, Vietnam War, Cold War 6.4 Post-Cold War7 See also 8 References 9 External linksStatutory limits[edit]U.S. lieutenant general flagsRank flag of a lieutenant general in the United States Army
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George W. Getty
Mexican–American War Seminole Wars American Civil WarPeninsula Campaign Battle of South Mountain Battle of Antietam Battle of Fredericksburg Siege of Suffolk Battle of the Wilderness Battle of Opequon Battle of Fisher's Hill Battle of Cedar Creek Third Battle of PetersburgGeorge Washington Getty (October 2, 1819 – October 1, 1901) was a career military officer in the United States Army, most noted for his role as a division commander in the Army of the Potomac during the final full year of the American Civil War.Contents1 Early life 2 Civil War 3 Postbellum career 4 Family 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Getty was born in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. He was appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, at the age of 16, and graduated 15th out of 42 graduates in the Class of 1840. Among his classmates were future Civil War generals William T. Sherman and George H. Thomas of the Union Army and Richard S
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