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Battle Of Itakhuli
The Battle of Itakhuli was fought in 1682 between the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
and the Mughal Empire. The Ahoms pushed back Mughal control to the west of the Manas river
Manas river
for good.[1] The main battle was fought at a garrison island on the Brahmaputra, in which the Mughal fauzdar, Mansur Khan, was defeated and the remnant of the Mughal forces pursued to the Manas river. With this win, the Ahoms recovered Sarkar Kamrup from the Mughals.Contents1 Ahom preparations 2 Mughal defences and battles 3 Spoils of the war 4 Notes 5 ReferencesAhom preparations[edit] After Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
became the Ahom king in 1681, preparations began in March 1682 for a war to expel the Mughals from Guwahati. An army was organized under the Dihingiya Alun Barbarua
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Ahom-Mughal Conflicts
Ahom–Mughal conflicts
Ahom–Mughal conflicts
refer to the period between the first Mughal attack on the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in 1615 and the final Battle of Itakhuli in 1682. The intervening period saw the fluctuating fortunes of both powers and the end of the rule of Koch Hajo
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Mughal–Maratha Wars
Sambhaji
Sambhaji
 † Rajaram Maharani Tarabai Hambirao Mohite † Malhoji Ghorpade † Santaji Ghorpade Dhanaji Jadhav Aurangzeb Bahadur Shah Azam Shah Zulfikar Khan Husain Ali KhanStrengthUnknown UnknownCasualties and lossesModerate Heavy2 million civilians in war-torn lands died due to drought, plague and famine.[1]The Mughal–Maratha Wars
Mughal–Maratha Wars
also called Maratha war of Independence were fought between the Maratha Empire
Maratha Empire
and the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
from 1680 to 1707
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Borphukan
Borphukan (Ahom language: Phu-Kan-Lung) was one of the five patra mantris (councillors) in the Ahom kingdom, a position that was created by the Ahom king Prataap Singha. The position included both executive and judicial powers, with jurisdiction of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
west of Kaliabor river. Most of the Borphukans belonged to the Ahom-Chutia community.[1] The headquarters of Borphukan was based in Kaliabor and later shifted to Itakhuli in Guwahati
Guwahati
during Lachit Borphukan
Lachit Borphukan
period after the Mughals
Mughals
were ousted from Guwahati. This position was particularly important and powerful because of its distance from the Ahom capital, giving it a semblance of independence. The region to the east of Kaliabor was governed by the Borbarua
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Laluksola Borphukan
Laluksola Borphukan (fl. 1672–1680) was a Borphukan of the Ahom kingdom, who abandoned Guwahati
Guwahati
after the Ahom win at Battle of Saraighat, and aspired to be a king
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Itakhuli
Itakhuli or Sukreswar Hill is a small hill on the south bank of the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
at Guwahati. The past official residence of the Deputy Commissioner of Kamrup District of Assam
Assam
was located on top of this hill. The D.C. bungalow was vacated for the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
river side development. Adjacent to it in the western side of the D.C.'s bungalow is the Sukreswar Temple. Itakhuli hill have always have been of strategic importance it was the seat of the viceroys and a garrison since the early days of Kamrup from Ahom, to Mughal and to the British
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East India Company
The East India
India
Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India
India
Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] that was formed to pursue trade with the "East Indies"[citation needed] (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China
Qing China
and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent. Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade[citation needed], particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea, and opium
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Bengal Subah
The Bengal
Bengal
Subah was a subdivision of the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
encompassing modern Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and the Indian states of West Bengal
West Bengal
and Orissa between the 16th and 18th centuries. The state was established following the dissolution of the Bengal
Bengal
Sultanate, when the region was absorbed into one of the largest empires in the world
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Deccan Plateau
The Deccan Plateau[1] is a large plateau in southern India. It rises to 100 metres (330 ft) in the north, and to more than 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) in the south, forming a raised triangle within the South-pointing triangle of the Indian subcontinent's coastline.[2] It extends over eight Indian states and encompasses a wide range of habitats, covering most of central and southern India.[3] The plateau is located between two mountain ranges, the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, each of which rises from its respective nearby coastal plain, and almost converge at the southern tip of India. It is separated from the Gangetic plain
Gangetic plain
to the north by the Satpura and Vindhya Ranges, which form its northern boundary
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Guwahati
Guwahati
Guwahati
(/ɡʊwəˈhɑːti/ ( listen) Pragjyotishpura
Pragjyotishpura
in ancient Assam, Gauhati in the modern era) is the largest city of Assam and Northeastern India, a major riverine
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Aurangzeb
Muhi-ud-Din Muhammad[3] (Persian: محي الدين محمد‎) (3 November 1618 – 3 March 1707),[1] commonly known by the sobriquet Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb
(Persian: اورنگ‌زیب‎ "Ornament of the Throne")[3] or by his regnal title Alamgir (Persian: عالمگير‎ "Conqueror of the World"),[4] was the sixth, and widely considered the last effective Mughal emperor
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Brahmaputra River
The Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
(/ˌbrɑːməˈpuːtrə/ is one of the major rivers of Asia, a trans-boundary river which flows through China, India
India
and Bangladesh. As such, it is known by various names in the region: Assamese: ব্ৰহ্মপুত্ৰ নদ ('নদ' nôd, masculine form of 'নদী' nôdi "river") Brôhmôputrô [bɹɔɦmɔputɹɔ]; Sanskrit: ब्रह्मपुत्र, IAST: Brahmaputra; Tibetan: ཡར་ཀླུངས་གཙང་པོ་, Wylie: yar klung gtsang po Yarlung Tsangpo; simplified Chinese: 布拉马普特拉河; traditional Chinese: 布拉馬普特拉河; pinyin: Bùlāmǎpǔtèlā Hé. It is also called Tsangpo-Brahmaputra (when referring to the whole river including the stretch within Tibet).[3] The Manas River, which runs through Bhutan, joins it at Jogighopa, in India
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Ahom Dynasty
The Ahom dynasty
Ahom dynasty
(1228–1826) ruled the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in present-day Assam
Assam
for nearly 600 years. The dynasty was established by Sukaphaa, a Shan prince of Mong Mao
Mong Mao
who came to Assam
Assam
after crossing the Patkai mountains
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Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
or Supaatpha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গদাধৰ সিংহ, reign 1681–1696[1]) established the rule of the Tungkhungia clan of the Ahom kings that ruled the Ahom kingdom till its climactic end. He was the son of Gobar Roja, a descendant of Suhungmung, and who had become the king for a mere 20 days. Previously known as Gadapani, Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
was able to stabilize the kingdom after the decade long turmoil following the Ahom victory in the Battle of Saraighat. This period saw the ruthless power grab of Debera Borbarua and Laluksola Borphukan's abandonment of Guwahati
Guwahati
and oppression via Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja. Gadadhar Singha retook Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals for good, and established a strong rule of 'blood and iron'
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