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Battle Of Huế
US & South Vietnamese victory[1]Massacre perpetrated by Vietcong and the NVA resulted in thousands of civilians killed Sustained damage to the Hue city and ancient imperial city of HueBelligerents South Vietnam United States North Vietnam Viet CongCommanders and leaders Ngô Quang Trưởng Stanley S. Hughes Foster LaHue John J. Tolson Trần Văn QuangStrength11 ARVN battalions 4 U.S. Army
U.S. Army
battalions 3 U.S. Marine Corps
U.S

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US Air Force
Department of Defense Department of the Air ForceHeadquarters The Pentagon Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.Motto(s) "Aim High ... Fly-Fight-Win"[7] "Integrity first, Service before self, Excellence in all we do"[8]Colors Ultramarine
Ultramarine
blue, Golden yellow[9]          March The U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
 Play (help·info)Anniversaries 18 SeptemberEngagementsSee listMexican Expedition (As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps) World War I
World War I
(As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
Aviation Section, U.S

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Viet Cong
The Việt Cộng (Vietnamese: [vîət kə̂wŋmˀ] ( listen)), also known as the National Liberation Front, was a mass political organization in South Vietnam and Cambodia
Cambodia
with its own army – the People's Liberation Armed Forces of South Vietnam
South Vietnam
(PLAF) – that fought against the United States and South Vietnamese governments during the Vietnam
Vietnam
War, eventually emerging on the winning side. It had both guerrilla and regular army units, as well as a network of cadres who organized peasants in the territory it controlled. Many soldiers were recruited in South Vietnam, but others were attached to the People's Army of Vietnam
Vietnam
(PAVN), the regular North Vietnamese army. During the war, communists and anti-war activists insisted the Việt Cộng was an insurgency indigenous to the South, while the U.S
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Joint Warfare In South Vietnam, 1963–69
Anti-Communist forces:  South Vietnam  United States  Australia  Philippines  South Korea  New Zealand Laos Hmong  ThailandCommunist forces: Viet Cong  North Vietnam Pathet Lao Khmer RougeSupported by Spain  Taiwan  Japan  Canada  West Germany IranSupported by Soviet Union  North Korea  China  Cuba Czechoslovakia Mongolia Bulgaria  East Germany Poland  Burma  India  SwedenCommanders and leaders Bùi Đình Đạm Huỳnh Văn Cao John Paul Vann Đỗ Cao Trí Roger H. C. Donlon George Stephen Morrison Nguyen Co Franklin P. Eller Nguyễn Chánh Thi Cao Văn Viên Charles Q. Williams Lewis W. Walt John Healy Thomas W. Brown Harold G. Moore Basil L. Plumley Robert McDade Lowell E. English Byung Soo Choi Ngô Quang Trưởng Harry Smith Guy S. Meloy Kyung-Jin Chung Colin Townsend Emil Radics Herman Nickerson James A. Graham Albert C
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Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
Vietnam[2]Advisory 1962–1965 Defense 1965 Counteroffensive 1965–1966 Counteroffensive, Phase II 1966–1967 Counteroffensive, Phase III 1967–1968 TET Counteroffensive 1968 Counteroffensive, Phase IV 1968 Counteroffensive, Phase V 1968 Counteroffensive, Phase VI 1968–1969 TET 69/Counteroffensive 1969 Summer–Fall 1969 Winter–Spring 1970 Sanctuary Counteroffensive 1970 Counteroffensive, Phase VII 1970–1971 Consolidation I 1971 Consolidation II 1971–1972 Cease-Fire 1972–1973CommandersNotable commanders Paul D. Harkins William C. Westmoreland Creighton W. Abrams Frederick C. WeyandU.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
(MACV) was a joint-service command of the United States Department of Defense. MACV was created on 8 February 1962, in response to the increase in United States military assistance to South Vietnam
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People's Army Of Vietnam
Viettel Mobile Z111 Factory Hong Ha shipbuilding company (Z173) 189 Shipbuilding Company (Z189) Song Thu Shipbuilding Company (Z124) Service Flight Corporation Group 559Foreign suppliers  Russia  Czech Republic  Bulgaria  France  Australia  Belarus  Serbia  Germany  Japan  Netherlands  Belgium  Israel  Portugal  South Africa  Spain  Finland  Italy  Sweden  Turkey  South Korea  United States  India  Poland  United Kingdom  Singapore Former:  Soviet Union  China  Czechoslovakia  Romania  Hungary  Bulgaria  Poland  East Germany  MongoliaAnnual exports  Cambodia  Laos  Myanmar  Philippines  Mongolia  Yemen  Algeria  Tanzania  Mozambique  Sri Lanka  AngolaRelated articlesHistoryMilitary history of VietnamWorld War II (Anti-Japan
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Army Of The Republic Of Vietnam
Regular Forces: 410,000 Territorial Militias: 532,000Regional Forces: 284,000 Popular Force: 248,000Total: 942,000 in 1972[1]Part of Republic of Vietnam
Vietnam
Military ForcesGarrison/HQ Saigon, South VietnamNickname(s) QLVNCH (SVA, ARVN
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Trần Văn Quang
Trần Văn Quang (1917 - 3 November 2013) was a colonel general (three-star general) of the People's Army of Vietnam. He was a deputy chief of staff of PAV and a vice minister of Vietnam's Ministry of Defence. During the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, Quang was the head of Department of Operations. Born in 1917 in Nghi Lộc, Nghệ An Province, North Central Coast region of Vietnam, Quang is a son of Trần Văn Năng - a Confucianist who was jailed by French colonial government for six months. His elder brother is Trần Văn Tăng - a teacher and revolutionist and member of New Revolutionary Party of Vietnam who was also jailed by the French and died in prison. His second elder brother is Trần Văn Cung, who was a Vietnamese revolutionary and was the secretary of the first communist cell in Vietnam.[1] His young brother is Trần Văn Bành, who was an Colonel of PAV. Quang joined the Communist Party of Indochina in 1936
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John J. Tolson
John J. Tolson III (October 22, 1915 – December 2, 1991) was a lieutenant general in the United States Army. During the Vietnam War, he helped implement the airmobile concept use of helicopters in combat with the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile).[1][2] Tolson credited the U.S Marines for first using helicopters to transport troops into combat in the Korean War, making the ground fight a three-dimensional war, thus freeing troops from the tyranny of terrain.[3][4] In World War II, John J. Tolson was a member of the 503rd Parachute Infantry Battalion and participated in every jump with that unit,[2] including the recapture of Corregidor in 1945.[5] In the Vietnam War, Major General Tolson took command of 1st Cavalry Division in April 1967 and served in that capacity till July 14, 1969. Under his command, his division played crucial roles during the Tet Offensive at the former Imperial capital at Hue and at Quang Tri City in January 1968
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Stanley S. Hughes
World War IIBattle of Cape Gloucester Battle of PeleliuVietnam WarBattle of Hue Battle of Khe SanhAwards Navy Cross(2), Silver Star, Legion of MeritStanley Smith Hughes (29 October 1918 – 5 January 2001) was a commanding officer in the United States Marine Corps during the Vietnam War
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War In Vietnam (1959–63)
Americanization of the Vietnam WarFoundation of the National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Anti-Buddhism in South Vietnam Strategic Hamlet Program
Strategic Hamlet Program
to combat the communist insurgency by means of population transfer of its supporters Large Buddhist revolt Arrest and assassination of Ngô Đình Diệm Dương Văn Minh succeeds Diệm
Diệm
as presidentBelligerentsAnti- Communist
Communist
forces:  South Vietnam  United States  Australia Communist
Communist
forces:  North Vietnam Viet Cong  China Supported by:  Soviet UnionCommanders and leaders Ngô Đình Diệm Lam Quang Thi Dwight D. Eisenhower John F
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North Vietnam
North Vietnam, officially the Democratic Republic
Republic
of Vietnam
Vietnam
(DRV) (Vietnamese: Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa), was a country in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
from 1945 to 1976, although it did not achieve widespread recognition until 1954.[a] Vietnamese revolutionary leader Hồ Chí Minh
Hồ Chí Minh
declared independence from France
France
on 2 September 1945 and announced the creation of the Democratic Republic
Republic
of Vietnam. France
France
reasserted its colonial dominance and a war ensued between France
France
and the Viet Minh, led by President Ho Chi Minh. The Viet Minh
Viet Minh
("League for the Independence of Vietnam") was a coalition of nationalist groups, mostly led by communists
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Vietnam
Coordinates: 16°10′N 107°50′E / 16.167°N 107.833°E / 16.167; 107.833Socialist Republic
Republic
of Vietnam Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam  (Vietnamese)FlagEmblemMotto: Độc lập – Tự do – Hạnh phúc "Independence – Freedom – Happiness"Anthem: Tiến Quân Ca[a] (English: "Army March")Location of  Vietnam  (green) in ASEAN  (dark grey)  –  [Legend]Capital Hanoi 21°2′N 105°51′E / 21.033°N 105.850°E / 21.033; 105.850Largest city
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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1965 Qui Nhơn Hotel Bombing
The Viet Cuong Hotel in Qui Nhơn, was bombed by the Viet Cong
Viet Cong
on the evening of 10 February 1965, during the Vietnam War. Viet Cong
Viet Cong
(VC) operatives detonated explosive charges causing the entire building to collapse. The explosion killed 23 U.S. servicemen and 2 of the Viet Cong attackers.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Explosion 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] The 4-storey Khách Sạn Viet Cuong or Viet Cuong Hotel (“Strength of Vietnam”) was used as a U.S. Army enlisted men's billet in the city of Qui Nhơn. Many of the 60 men billeted there came from the 140th Transportation Detachment (Cargo Helicopter Field Maintenance) who provided maintenance support for the 117th Assault Helicopter Company based at Qui Nhơn
Qui Nhơn
Airfield. Following the VC Attack on Camp Holloway
Attack on Camp Holloway
on 6–7 February 1965, the U.S
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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