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Battle Of Dale
The Battle of Dale is a fictional battle in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Lord of the Rings
during the War of the Ring. An earlier battle in the same location which preceded a re-establishment of the Dwarven kingdom was called the Battle of Five Armies. The Dwarves of the Lonely Mountain (also known as Erebor) and the Men of Dale refused to acknowledge the overlordship and alliance of Sauron. While his larger southern armies invaded Gondor, a Host of Easterlings advanced in the north to extend his dominion and to prevent the armies of his enemies joining together under one banner. On March 17 of the year 3019 in the Third Age, Sauron
Sauron
sent a host of Easterlings to attack Dale.[1] The combined forces of the Men of Dale under King Brand[2] and the Dwarves of the Lonely Mountain under King Dáin Ironfoot marched out to meet the Easterlings in battle
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Tolkien Fandom
Tolkien
Tolkien
fandom is an international, informal community of fans of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, especially of the Middle-earth
Middle-earth
legendarium which includes The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. "Fandom" is a term used to describe a specific type of fan subculture. " Tolkien
Tolkien
fandom" in this sense sprang up in the United States in the 1960s, in the context of the hippie movement, to the dismay of the author ( Tolkien
Tolkien
died in 1973), who talked of "my deplorable cultus".[1] A Tolkienist
Tolkienist
is someone who studies the work of J. R. R
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Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
of Númenor
Númenor
and Middle-earth
Middle-earth
is a collection of stories and essays by J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. Unlike The Silmarillion, for which the narrative fragments were modified to connect into a consistent and coherent work, the Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
are presented as Tolkien
Tolkien
left them, with little more than names changed (the author having had a confusing habit of trying out different names for a character while writing a draft). Thus some of these are incomplete stories, while others are collections of information about Middle-earth
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Mirkwood
Mirkwood
Mirkwood
is a name used for two distinct fictional forests on the continent of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. One of these occurred in the First Age of Middle-earth, when the highlands of Dorthonion north of Beleriand became known as Mirkwood after falling under Morgoth's control. The other Mirkwood, and the more famous of the two, was the large forest in Wilderland, east of the Anduin
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Mordor
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional world of Middle-earth, Mordor (pronounced [ˈmɔrdɔr]; from Sindarin
Sindarin
Black Land and Quenya
Quenya
Land of Shadow) was the region occupied and controlled by Sauron, in the southeast of northwestern Middle-earth
Middle-earth
to the East of Anduin, the great river. Orodruin, a volcano in Mordor, was the goal of the Fellowship of the Ring (and later Frodo Baggins
Frodo Baggins
and Sam Gamgee) in the quest to destroy the One Ring. Mordor has three enormous mountain ranges surrounding it, from the north, from the west and from the south
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Eriador
Eriador is a large region in J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional world of Middle-earth. The Shire, a land which became famous in the Third Age and again in modern times, was located in the central west of this region. The region was also called the Lone-lands, a translation of Eriador.[1]Contents1 Middle-earth
Middle-earth
narrative1.1 Overview 1.2 Population and settlements 1.3 Geography2 Depictions in adaptations 3 See also 4 References4.1 Inline citations 4.2 General references5 External links Middle-earth
Middle-earth
narrative[edit] Overview[edit] Originally Eriador was largely forested, but in the Second Age Dúnedain felled most of the forests to build ships.[2] In the late Second Age and early Third Age, much of Eriador was encompassed by the kingdom of Arnor, which later split into the rival kingdoms of Rhudaur, Arthedain and Cardolan
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King Elessar
Aragorn II, son of Arathorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He is one of the main protagonists of The Lord of the Rings. Aragorn was a Ranger of the North, first introduced with the name Strider at Bree, as the Hobbits continued to call him throughout The Lord of the Rings. He was eventually discovered to be the heir of Isildur and rightful claimant to the thrones of Arnor and Gondor. He was also a confidant of Gandalf and an integral part of the quest to destroy the One Ring and defeat the Dark Lord Sauron. Aragorn led the Fellowship of the Ring following the loss of Gandalf in the Mines of Moria while fighting the Balrog. When the Fellowship was broken, he tracked the hobbits Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took with the help of Legolas the elf and Gimli the dwarf to Fangorn Forest. He then fought in the battle at Helm's Deep and the Battle of the Pelennor Fields
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Gimli (Middle-earth)
Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. A dwarf warrior, he is the son of Glóin
Glóin
(a character from Tolkien's earlier novel, The Hobbit). Gimli is chosen to represent the race of Dwarves in the Fellowship of the Ring. As such, he is one of the primary characters of the novel. In the course of the adventure, Gimli aids the Ring-bearer, participates in the War of the Ring, and becomes close friends with Legolas, overcoming an ancient enmity of Dwarves and Elves.Contents1 Character overview 2 Appearances2.1 Literature 2.2 Adaptations3 Concept and creation 4 Family tree 5 Notes and references 6 External linksCharacter overview[edit] Gimli was a member of Durin's Folk
Durin's Folk
who volunteered to accompany Frodo Baggins as a member of the Fellowship of the Ring on the quest to destroy the One Ring
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Aragorn
Aragorn
Aragorn
II, son of Arathorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He is one of the main protagonists of The Lord of the Rings. Aragorn
Aragorn
was a Ranger of the North, first introduced with the name Strider at Bree, as the Hobbits continued to call him throughout The Lord of the Rings. He was eventually discovered to be the heir of Isildur and rightful claimant to the thrones of Arnor and Gondor. He was also a confidant of Gandalf
Gandalf
and an integral part of the quest to destroy the One Ring
One Ring
and defeat the Dark Lord Sauron. Aragorn
Aragorn
led the Fellowship of the Ring following the loss of Gandalf in the Mines of Moria while fighting the Balrog
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Helm's Deep
In J. R. R. Tolkien's high fantasy writings, Helm's Deep was a large valley in the north-western White Mountains of Middle-earth
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The Return Of The King
The Return of the King
The Return of the King
is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. The story begins in the kingdom of Gondor, which is soon to be attacked by the Dark Lord Sauron.Contents1 Title 2 Plot summary2.1 Book V: The War of the Ring 2.2 Book VI: The End of the Third Age3 Critical reception 4 Adaptations 5 Editions 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTitle[edit] Tolkien
Tolkien
conceived of The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
as a single volume comprising six "books" plus extensive appendices. The original publisher split the work into three volumes, publishing the fifth and sixth books with the appendices into the final volume with the title The Return of the King
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Middle-earth Warfare
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth, much of the history of the three ages of his legendarium are concerned with wars and the battles and armies of those wars.Contents1 Armies of Middle-earth, hierarchy and organization1.1 Orc-hosts, Orc-armies, Orc-legions, Auxiliaries and Allies 1.2 Hosts and Armies of Elves, Men and Dwarves2 Armies and hosts through the three ages of Middle-earth2.1 War of Wrath in the First Age 2.2 The War of the Last Alliance in the Second Age 2.3 The War of the Ring in the Third Age3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyArmies of Middle-earth, hierarchy and organization[edit]Races of Middle-earthAinurValar MaiarOther racesElves Men Hobbits Dwarves Ents Eagles Orcs Trolls Dragonsv t eThe charts below show the general hierarchical[1] terms used by Tolkien to describe military formations and organization, and how these relate to specific or estimated strengths in battles throughout the history of Middle-earth
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Christopher Tolkien
Christopher John Reuel Tolkien (born 21 November 1924) is the third son of the author J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
(1892–1973), and the editor of much of his father's posthumously published work. He drew the original maps for his father's The Lord of the Rings, which he signed C. J. R. T.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Editorial work on J. R. R. Tolkien's manuscripts 2.2 Reaction to filmed versions of J. R. R. Tolkien's works3 Personal life 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Christopher Tolkien was born in Leeds, the third and youngest son of John Ronald Reuel Tolkien and his wife, Edith Mary Tolkien (née Bratt)
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Oropher
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Elves are one of the races that inhabit a fictional Earth, often called Middle-earth, and set in the remote past. They appear in The Hobbit and in The Lord of the Rings. Their complex history is described in The Silmarillion, as well as in the Unfinished Tales and The History of Middle-earth. The following is an alphabetically ordered list of Elves that are named in Tolkien's works. It excludes the Half-elven such as Elrond and Arwen. Elvish names have meanings in the Elvish languages devised by Tolkien, e.g
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Rivendell
Rivendell
Rivendell
is an Elven realm in Middle-earth, a fictional world created by J. R. R. Tolkien. It is an important location in Tolkien's legendarium, and is featured in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales. It was established and ruled by Elrond
Elrond
Half-elven in the Second Age of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
(four or five thousand years before the events of The Lord of the Rings), and was protected by the powers of its lord and his elven ring Vilya. Elrond
Elrond
lived in Rivendell
Rivendell
with his family—his wife Celebrían (until she departed for Valinor), their sons Elladan and Elrohir, and their daughter Arwen—as well as a sizeable number of other Elves, both Noldor and Sindar
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Gandalf
Gandalf
Gandalf
/ˈɡændɑːlf/[2] is a fictional character and one of the protagonists in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels The Hobbit
The Hobbit
and The Lord of the Rings. He is a wizard, member of the Istari order, as well as leader of the Fellowship of the Ring and the army of the West. In The Lord of the Rings, he is initially known as Gandalf
Gandalf
the Grey, but returns from death as Gandalf
Gandalf
the White.Contents1 Characteristics 2 Internal biography2.1 Valinor 2.2 Middle-earth2.2.1 The White Council 2.2.2 The Quest of Erebor 2.2.3 Prelude to the War of the Ring 2.2.4 The Fellowship of the Ring 2.2.5 Gandalf
Gandalf
the White3 Concept and creation 4 Adaptations 5 Reception and legacy 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Certh no
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.