HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Battle Of Montecatini
The Battle of Montecatini was fought in the Val di Nievole on 29 August 1315 between the Republic of Pisa, and the forces of both the Kingdom of Naples
Kingdom of Naples
and the Republic of Florence.[1] The army of Pisa, commanded by Uguccione della Faggiuola, won a decisive victory despite being outnumbered. The Neapolitan forces, made up of nearly 60,000 men, were commanded by Philip I of Taranto. While he survived the battle, his eldest son Charles of Taranto and his brother Peter, Count of Eboli and Gravina, were both killed in the fight. Additional deaths included members of 114 Florentine noble families, as well as Francesco della Faggiuola, son of Uguccione. References[edit]^ Hyett, Francis Adams (1903). Florence: Her History and Art to the Fall of the Republic. Methuen & Co. This article about a battle is a stub
[...More...]

"Battle Of Montecatini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Montecatini Terme
Montecatini Terme
Montecatini Terme
is an Italian municipality (commune) of 21,095 inhabitants within the province of Pistoia
Pistoia
in Tuscany, Italy. It is the most important center in Valdinievole. The town is located at the eastern end of Piana di Lucca
Lucca
and has a strong vocation for tourism, as well as industrial and commercial industries related to the spa, which in turn has increased the interest for hotel accommodation in the region. History[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Montecatini Terme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Val Di Nievole
Valdinievole or Val di Nievole (Italian pronunciation: [ˈvaldiˈnjɛːvole] "Valley of the Nievole (River)") is an area in the south-western part of the province of Pistoia, Tuscany, Italy. The saint Allucio of Campigliano (1070–1134) was born to a wealthy, landed family in the Valdinievole and he ministered to the poor and travellers there. Geography[edit] The area is made up of 11 comuni: Buggiano, Chiesina Uzzanese, Larciano, Lamporecchio, Massa e Cozzile, Monsummano Terme, Montecatini Terme, Pescia, Pieve a Nievole, Ponte Buggianese, and Uzzano, and has a population of almost 120,000
[...More...]

"Val Di Nievole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Republic Of Pisa
The Republic of Pisa
Pisa
(Italian: Repubblica di Pisa) was a de facto independent state centered on the Tuscan city of Pisa
Pisa
during the late 10th and 11th centuries. It rose to become an economic powerhouse, a commercial center whose merchants dominated Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Italian trade for a century before being surpassed and superseded by the Republic of Genoa
[...More...]

"Republic Of Pisa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Republic Of Florence
The Republic of Florence, also known as the Florentine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Fiorentina, pronounced [reˈpubblika fjorenˈtina]), was a medieval and early modern state that was centered on the Italian city of Florence
Florence
in Tuscany.[1][2] The republic originated in 1115, when the Florentine people rebelled against the Margraviate of Tuscany
Tuscany
upon the death of Matilda of Tuscany, a woman who controlled vast territories that included Florence. The Florentines formed a commune in her successors' place.[3] The republic was ruled by a council known as the Signoria of Florence. The signoria was chosen by the gonfaloniere (titular ruler of the city), who was elected every two months by Florentine guild members. The republic had a checkered history of coups and counter-coups against various factions. The Medici
Medici
faction gained governance of the city in 1434 under Cosimo de' Medici
[...More...]

"Republic Of Florence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of Naples
The Kingdom of Naples
Naples
(Latin: Regnum Neapolitanum; Italian: Regno di Napoli) comprised that part of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
south of the Papal States
Papal States
between 1282 and 1816. It was created as a result of the War of the Sicilian Vespers
Sicilian Vespers
(1282–1302), when the island of Sicily revolted and was conquered by the Crown of Aragon, becoming a separate Kingdom of Sicily.[1] Naples
Naples
continued to be officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily, the name of the formerly unified kingdom. For much of its existence, the realm was contested between French and Spanish dynasties
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Naples" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Italy
Timeline Italy
Italy
portalv t ePart of a series on theCulture of ItalyHistoryPeopleLanguagesTraditionsMythology and folkloreMythology folkloreCuisineFestivalsReligionArtLiteratureMusic and performing artsMusicMediaTelevision CinemaSportMonumentsWorld Heritage SitesSymbolsFlag Coat of arms Italy
Italy
portalv t eIn archaic times, ancient Greeks, Etruscans
Etruscans
and Celts
Celts
established settlements in the south, the centre and the north of Italy respectively, while various Italian tribes and Italic peoples inhabitated the Italian peninsula
Italian peninsula
and insular Italy
[...More...]

"History Of Italy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uguccione Della Faggiuola
Uguccione della Faggiuola
Uguccione della Faggiuola
(c. 1250 – 1 November 1319) was an Italian condottiero, and chief magistrate of Pisa, Lucca
Lucca
and Forlì
Forlì
(from 1297). Biography[edit]A portrait of Uguccione della FaggiuolaUguccione was born at Casteldelci. He came to prominence in the late 13th century as captain for the Aretine army, when he successfully captured Cesena. In 1297, he attempted to conquer Forlì
Forlì
but was unsuccessful. Of Ghibelline
Ghibelline
association, in 1311–1312 he was imperial vicar in Genoa
Genoa
for Henry VII, who came to Pisa
Pisa
in 1312. After the latter's death in 1313, Uguccione was made chief magistrate (podestà), captain of the people, and virtual lord of that city. He conquered Lucca
Lucca
in 1314 with the help of his protégé Castruccio Castracani
[...More...]

"Uguccione Della Faggiuola" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Charles Of Taranto
Charles of Taranto (1296 – 29 August 1315) was the eldest son of Philip I, Prince of Taranto
Philip I, Prince of Taranto
and titular Latin Emperor of Constantinople, and his wife, Thamar Angelina Komnene, daughter of the Despot of Epirus, Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas. Charles' father, Philip, was invested with the Principality of Achaea in southern Greece
Greece
in 1307. However, there existed a rival claim to the principality in the person of Matilda of Hainaut, the wife of Guy II de la Roche, Duke of Athens. Guy was made Philip's bailli in Achaea, but he died in 1308 without children, leaving Matilda a widow.[1][2] In 1309, the fifteen-year-old Matilda was betrothed to the twelve-year-old Charles, in an attempt to reconcile the competing claims to Achaea
[...More...]

"Charles Of Taranto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peter Tempesta
Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315), called Tempesta (meaning "storm"), was the Count of Eboli
Eboli
from 1306. He was the eighth son of Charles II of Naples and Mary of Hungary (see Elizabeth of Sicily).[1] His sobriquet came from his stormy temperament. In 1309, he received Nocera and Isernia
Isernia
and exchanged Montescaglioso for Sorrento
Sorrento
and Castellammare di Stabia. He began serving his brother, King Robert, against the Ghibellines
Ghibellines
of Uguccione della Faggiuola in Tuscany
[...More...]

"Peter Tempesta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philip I Of Taranto
Philip I of Taranto (10 November 1278 – 23 December 1332), of the Angevin house, was titular Latin Emperor of Constantinople (as Philip II), despot of Epirus, King of Albania, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, and Lord of Durazzo. Born in Naples, Philip was a younger son of Charles II of Anjou, King of Naples, and Maria of Hungary, daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary.Contents1 First marriage 2 War of the Vespers 3 Balkan adventure 4 Second marriage 5 Guelph-Ghibelline War 6 Frankish Greece 7 Family 8 Ancestry 9 Notes 10 SourcesFirst marriage[edit] On 4 February 1294, his father named him Prince of Taranto at Aix-en-Provence, and on 12 July 1294, Vicar-General of the Kingdom of Sicily. These dignities were a prelude to Charles' plan to bestow upon Philip an empire east of the Adriatic. The day he was invested as Vicar-General, he married by proxy Thamar Angelina Komnene, daughter of Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas, Despot of Epirus
[...More...]

"Philip I Of Taranto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Montecatini
The Battle of Montecatini was fought in the Val di Nievole on 29 August 1315 between the Republic of Pisa, and the forces of both the Kingdom of Naples
Kingdom of Naples
and the Republic of Florence.[1] The army of Pisa, commanded by Uguccione della Faggiuola, won a decisive victory despite being outnumbered. The Neapolitan forces, made up of nearly 60,000 men, were commanded by Philip I of Taranto. While he survived the battle, his eldest son Charles of Taranto and his brother Peter, Count of Eboli and Gravina, were both killed in the fight. Additional deaths included members of 114 Florentine noble families, as well as Francesco della Faggiuola, son of Uguccione. References[edit]^ Hyett, Francis Adams (1903). Florence: Her History and Art to the Fall of the Republic. Methuen & Co. This article about a battle is a stub
[...More...]

"Battle Of Montecatini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.