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Battle Of Gloucester (1777)
 Great Britain Hesse-KasselCommanders and leaders Marquis de Lafayette Armand de La Rouërie Lord CornwallisStrength350 regulars and militia 350 jägersCasualties and losses1 killed 5 wounded 20 killed 20 wounded 20 capturedv t e Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Clow Rebellion Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthThe Battle of Gloucester was a skirmish fought between November 25, 1777 and the early morning of November 26, 1777, during the Philadelphia campaign
Philadelphia campaign
of the American Revolutionary War
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Gloucester, Massachusetts
Gloucester
Gloucester
/ˈɡlɒstər/ is a city on Cape Ann
Cape Ann
in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. It is part of Massachusetts' North Shore. The population was 28,789 at the 2010 U.S
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Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America
North America
founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada and the Caribbean, as well as East and West Florida. In the 18th century, the British government operated its colonies under a policy of mercantilism, in which the central government administered its possessions for the economic benefit of the mother country
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Battle Of Matson's Ford
John Lacey James Potter Lord CornwallisStrengthUnknown 3,500Casualties and losses5 or 6 killed 20 wounded 20 captured[1] Unknownv t e Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Clow Rebellion Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthThe Battle of Matson's Ford
Battle of Matson's Ford
was a battle in the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign of the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
fought on December 11, 1777 in the area surrounding Matson's Ford (present-day Conshohocken and West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania)
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Valley Forge
Valley Forge
Valley Forge
functioned as the third of eight military encampments for the Continental Army’s main body, commanded by General George Washington. In September 1777, British forces had captured the American capital of Philadelphia. After failing to retake the city, Washington led his 12,000-person army into winter quarters at Valley Forge, located approximately 18 miles (29 km) northwest of Philadelphia.[1][2] They remained there for six months, from December 19, 1777 to June 19, 1778.[3] At Valley Forge, the Continentals struggled to manage a disastrous supply crisis while retraining and reorganizing their units
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Conway Cabal
The Conway Cabal
Conway Cabal
was a group of senior Continental Army
Continental Army
officers in late 1777 and early 1778 who aimed to have George Washington
George Washington
replaced as commander-in-chief of the Army during the American Revolutionary War. It was named after Brigadier General Thomas Conway, whose letters criticizing Washington were forwarded to the Second Continental Congress. When these suggestions (which were often little more than criticisms and expressions of discontent with either Washington or the general course of the war) were made public, supporters of Washington mobilized to assist him politically. Conway ended up resigning from the army, and General Horatio Gates, a leading candidate to replace Washington, issued an apology for his role in events. No formal requests were ever made asking for Washington's removal as commander in chief
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Battle Of Quinton's Bridge
Charles Mawhood John Graves SimcoeStrength300 1,200Casualties and losses30-40 killed, wounded and missing 1 woundedv t e Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Clow Rebellion Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthThe Battle
Battle
of Quinton's Bridge was a minor battle of the American Revolutionary War fought on March 18, 1778, during the British occupation of Philadelphia
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Clow Rebellion
The Clow Rebellion was a Loyalist
Loyalist
insurrection that took place in mid-April 1778, during the American Revolutionary War. It took place on the Delaware
Delaware
side of the Maryland- Delaware
Delaware
border and was led by Cheney Clow
Cheney Clow
(sometimes spelled "China" Clow). The rebellion was suppressed by Maryland
Maryland
and Delaware
Delaware
militia. The insurrection was spurred by a foraging party that arrived in the area in late-February under the command of Henry Lee, who collected supplies for the Continental Army
Continental Army
stationed at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. Discontent over the foraging party led to the formation of an insurrection in March, which grew larger by mid-April, and coalesced under the command of Clow
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Battle Of Crooked Billet
John Graves Simcoe Robert AbercrombyStrength300-500 850Casualties and losses26 killed 8 wounded 58 captured 7 woundedv t e Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Clow Rebellion Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthBattle of Crooked Billet Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
historical marker commemorating the Battle of Crooked BilletCoordinates 40°11′03″N 75°06′02″W / 40.18405°N 75.10043°W / 40.18405; -75.10043 Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Historical MarkerOfficial name: Crooked BilletType RoadsideDesignated May 01, 1965[1]Location Meadowbrook Ave. near N Penn Ave. at Crooked Billet Elem
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Battle Of Barren Hill
 United StatesNative Americans[1] Great Britain Hesse-KasselCommanders and leaders Marquis de La Fayette Sir William Howe Sir Henry Clinton Charles Grey James GrantStrength2,200 troops 5 Guns 16,000 troopsCasualties and losses3 0v t ePhiladelphia campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Clow Rebellion Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthThe Battle of Barren Hill
Battle of Barren Hill
was a minor engagement during the American Revolution. On May 20, 1778, a British force attempted to encircle a smaller Continental force under the Marquis de Lafayette
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Carlisle Peace Commission
The Carlisle Peace Commission was a group of British negotiators who were sent to North America in 1778, during the American War of Independence. The commission carried an offer of self-rule to the rebellious colonies, including Parliamentary representation within the British Empire. The Second Continental Congress, aware that British troops were about to be withdrawn from Philadelphia, insisted on demanding full independence, which the commission was not authorised to grant
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Battle Of Monmouth
 Great BritainHesse-KasselCommanders and leaders George Washington Charles Lee Henry Knox Nathanael Greene Marquis de Lafayette Sir Henry Clinton Lord Cornwallis Alexander LeslieStrength11,000[1] 14,000–15,000[1]Casualties and losses362–500 killed, wounded or captured[2] 65–304 killed 170–770 wounded 60 captured[2][3]v t e Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign 1777–1778Bound Brook Short Hills Staten Island Cooch's Bridge Brandywine Clouds Paoli Germantown Red Bank Fort Mifflin Gloucester White Marsh Matson's Ford Valley Forge Conway Cabal Quinton's Bridge Crooked Billet Barren Hill Carlisle Peace Commission MonmouthThe Battle of Monmouth
Battle of Monmouth
was an American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
battle fought on June 28, 1778, in Monmouth County, New Jersey
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William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe
War of the Austrian Succession Seven Years' WarSiege of Louisbourg Battle of the Plains of Abraham Capture of Belle Île Battle of HavanaAmerican War of Independence Boston
Boston
campaign New York and New Jersey campaign Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaignFrench Revolutionary WarsGeneral William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (10 August 1729 – 12 July 1814) was a British Army
British Army
officer who rose to become Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American War of Independence. Howe was one of three brothers who had distinguished military careers. Having joined the army in 1746, Howe saw extensive service in the War of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years' War
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Siege Of Fort Mifflin
Sir William Howe John Montresor Lord Richard Howe Samuel Smith Simeon Thayer John HazelwoodStrength2,000, naval squadron 450 & reinforcements river flotillaCasualties and losses58 captured, over 62 killed HMS Augusta (64) sunk HMS Merlin (18) sunk 250 river flotilla scuttledThe Siege of Fort Mifflin
Fort Mifflin
or Siege of Mud Island Fort from September 26 to November 16, 1777 saw British land batteries commanded by Captain John Montresor
John Montresor
and a British naval squadron under Vice Admiral Lord Richard Howe attempt to capture an American fort in the Delaware River commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Smith. The operation finally succeeded when the wounded Smith's successor, Major
Major
Simeon Thayer, evacuated the fort on the night of November 15 and the British occupied the place the following morning
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Continental Congress
The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies. It became the governing body of the United States
United States
during the American Revolution. The Congress met from 1774 to 1789 in three incarnations. The first call for a convention was made over issues of the blockade and the Intolerable Acts
Intolerable Acts
penalizing the Province of Massachusetts, which in 1774 enabled Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
to convince the colonies to form a representative body
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