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Battle Of Gdynia
Battle of Gdynia
Gdynia
was one of the major battles in northern Poland during the Invasion of Poland
Poland
of 1939. The Germans' main push towards Gdynia
Gdynia
began on 8 September and they captured Gdynia
Gdynia
less than a week later on 14 September.Contents1 Before the battle 2 Battle 3 Quote 4 ReferencesBefore the battle[edit] Gdynia
Gdynia
is a major civilian and military port on the Baltic Sea, and was an important industrial centre of the Second Polish Republic. Its defence was one of the key elements in the Polish defence plan
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Danzig
Gdańsk
Gdańsk
(Polish pronunciation: [ɡdaɲsk] ( listen), English: /ɡəˈdaɪnsk, -ˈdɑːnsk, -ˈdænsk/[1]; German: Danzig [ˈdantsɪç] ( listen), English: /ˈdænsɪɡ/) is a Polish city on the Baltic coast
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Gdynia
Gdynia
Gdynia
[ˈɡdɨɲa] ( listen) (German: Gdingen, Kashubian: Gdiniô) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship
of Poland
Poland
and a seaport of Gdańsk Bay
Gdańsk Bay
on the south coast of the Baltic Sea. Located in Kashubia
Kashubia
in Eastern Pomerania, Gdynia
Gdynia
is part of a conurbation with the spa town of Sopot, the city of Gdańsk
Gdańsk
and suburban communities, which together form a metropolitan area called the Tricity (Trójmiasto), with a population of over a million people. For centuries, Gdynia
Gdynia
remained a small agricultural and fishing village on the Baltic coast. At the beginning of the 20th-century Gdynia
Gdynia
became a seaside resort town and experienced an inflow of tourists
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Pomeranian Voivodeship (1919–39)
A voivodeship /ˈvɔɪˌvoʊdˌʃɪp/ is the area administered by a voivode (Governor) in several countries of central and eastern Europe. Voivodeships have existed since medieval times in Poland, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Russia
Russia
and Serbia. The administrative level of area (territory) of voivodeship resembles that of a duchy in western medieval states, much as the title of voivode was equivalent to that of a duke. Other roughly equivalent titles and areas in medieval Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
included ban (bojan, vojin or bayan) and banate. In a modern context, the word normally refers to one of the provinces (województwa) of Poland
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Second Polish Republic
The Second Polish Republic, commonly known as interwar Poland, refers to the country of Poland
Poland
between the First and Second World Wars (1918–1939). Officially known as the Republic
Republic
of Poland
Poland
(Polish: Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska), the Polish state was recreated in 1918, in the aftermath of World War I. When, after several regional conflicts, the borders of the state were fixed in 1922, Poland's neighbours were Czechoslovakia, Germany, the Free City of Danzig, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania and the Soviet Union. It had access to the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
via a short strip of coastline either side of the city of Gdynia. Between March and August 1939, Poland
Poland
also shared a border with the then-Hungarian governorate of Subcarpathia
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
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Fedor Von Bock
Fedor von Bock
Fedor von Bock
(3 December 1880 – 4 May 1945) was a German field marshal who served in the German army during the Second World War. Bock served as the commander of Army Group North during the Invasion of Poland
Poland
in 1939, commander of Army Group B during the Invasion of France in 1940, and later as the commander of Army Group Center during the attack on the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in 1941; his final command was that of Army Group South
Army Group South
in 1942. Bock commanded Operation Typhoon, the ultimately failed attempt to capture Moscow
Moscow
during the autumn and winter of 1941
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Józef Unrug
Józef Unrug
Józef Unrug
(German: Joseph von Unruh; 6 October 1884 – 28 February 1973) was a Prussian-born Pole and Polish vice admiral who helped reestablish Poland's navy after World War I. During the opening stages of World War II, he served as the Polish Navy's commander-in-chief.Contents1 Biography 2 Honours and awards 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Józef Michał Hubert Unrug was born in Brandenburg an der Havel
Brandenburg an der Havel
into a Polish family, of German descent, son of Tadeusz Unrug, a Generalmajor in the Prussian Army. After graduating from the gymnasium in Dresden, Unrug completed Naval college in 1907 and began his service in the German Navy
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German Battleship Schleswig-Holstein
SMS Schleswig-Holstein[a] (pronounced [ˈʃleːsvɪç ˈhɔlʃtaɪ̯n]) was the last of the five Deutschland-class battleships built by the German Kaiserliche Marine. The ship, named for the province of Schleswig-Holstein, was laid down in the Germaniawerft dockyard in Kiel
Kiel
in August 1905 and commissioned into the fleet nearly three years later. The ships of her class were already outdated by the time they entered service, being inferior in size, armor, firepower and speed to the new generation of dreadnought battleships. Schleswig-Holstein
Schleswig-Holstein
fought in both World Wars. During World War I, she saw front-line service in the II Battle Squadron
II Battle Squadron
of the High Seas Fleet, culminating in the Battle of Jutland
Battle of Jutland
on 31 May – 1 June 1916
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Invasion Of Poland (1939)
German and Soviet victoryBeginning of World War IITerritorial changes Polish territory divided among Germany, the Soviet Union, Lithuania and Slovakia
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Battle Of Piotrków Trybunalski
Army Łódź:2nd Tank Battalion 30th Infantry Division Army Prusy:19th Infantry Division 29th Infantry Division Wileńska Cavalry Brigade XVI Panzer Corps:4th Panzer Division 1st Panzer Division 31st Infantry Division 14th Infantry DivisionCasualties and losses2 tanks[1]:60 17 Panzers, 2 self propelled guns, 14 armoured cars[1]:60v t eInvasion of PolandBattle of the BorderChojnice Krojanty Lasy Królewskie Mokra Pszczyna Grudziądz Mława Jordanów Fraustadt Węgierska Górka Tuchola Forest Częstochowa Mikołów Bukowiec Slovak invasionBaltic coastWesterplatte Danzig Danzig Bay Worek Plan Gdynia Hel Kępa Oksywska4–10 SeptemberTomaszów Mazowiecki Wizna Łódź Borowa Góra Piotrków Różan Pułtusk Radom Łomża Barak Wola CyrusowaNorthern FrontSiege of Warsaw Bzura Kałuszyn Węgrów Wilno Modlin Kobryń Brześć 2nd Tomaszów Lubelski Wólka Węglowa Kampinos F
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Battle Of Radom
The Battle of Radom, also known as the Battle of Iłża, was part of the Invasion of Poland
Poland
during the Second World War. It lasted from 8 September 1939 to 9 September 1939. Polish troops of the Prusy Army, under General Stanisław Skwarczyński, defended the city of Iłża and the road from Sandomierz to Radom. The Poles were not ready to meet head on overwhelming German XV Army Corps (General Hermann Hoth), and were easily defeated after two days of fighting. Prusy Army, in the aftermath of the battle, ceased to exist. Some of the army's units joined other tactical groupings of the Polish armed forces. Background[edit] Armia Prusy, which was regarded as strategic reserve of Polish forces, remained deep behind front line, and was not planned to enter the battle before mid-September
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Battle Of Różan
The Battle of Różan, otherwise known as defence of Różan bridgehead, took place between September 4 and September 6, 1939, in the fields before the town of Różan
Różan
on the Narew River. A small Polish garrison of three World War I
World War I
forts (consisting of two infantry battalions) successfully defended the bridgehead against the entire German panzer division for the entire day and night. However, as a result of a misunderstanding of the commander in chief's orders, the Polish forces were then withdrawn to the other side of the river, and then further eastwards on September 6. References[edit](in Polish) Robert Olbryś (2003) Różan
Różan
w wojnie obronnej 1939 r.. Pułtusk: WSHCoordinates: 52°53′22″N 21°23′57″E / 52.889349°N 21.399075°E / 52.889349; 21.399075This article about a battle in Polish history is a stub
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Battle Of Wizna
The Battle of Wizna
Wizna
was fought between September 7 and September 10, 1939, between the forces of Poland
Poland
and Germany during the initial stages of invasion of Poland. According to Polish historian Leszek Moczulski, between 350 and 720 Poles defended a fortified line for three days against more than 40,000 Germans.[1] Although defeat was inevitable, the Polish defence stalled the attacking forces for three days and postponed the encirclement of Independent Operational Group Narew
Narew
fighting nearby.[2] Eventually the tanks broke through the Polish line and German engineers eliminated all the bunkers one by one
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Battle Of Borowa Góra
Battle of Borowa Góra
Battle of Borowa Góra
(Polish: Bitwa pod Borową Górą) refers to the series of battles from 2 to 5 September 1939 that took place near the Góry Borowskie hills, south west from Piotrków Trybunalski
Piotrków Trybunalski
and east of Bełchatów. The battle, fought between the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
and the Polish Army
Polish Army
in the vicinity of Łódź, was a direct consequence of the Battle of the Border, an early part of the German Invasion of Poland[1] The three hills (278 meters above sea level) formed an important strategic point that the German XVI Army Corps needed to break through in order to advance toward Radomsko, Piotrków Trybunalski
Piotrków Trybunalski
and Bełchatów, and further into central Poland
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