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Bati Del Wambara
Bati del Wambara (Harari: ባቲ ዲል ወምባራ, fl. 1531, literally Victory is her seat)[1] was the Harari[2] daughter of Mahfuz, Emir of Harar
Harar
in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and later Governor of Zeila. She married Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
and accompanied him in his jihad[3] to make Ethiopia
Ethiopia
a Muslim
Muslim
province.[1] During this expedition, she gave birth to two sons - Muhammad in 1531 and Ahmad in 1533.[1] After Imam ibn Ibrahim's death, she married the successive Emir of Adal, Nur ibn Mujahid. This was a political marriage aiming to enforce Nur's legitimacy. She is supposed to have pushed him into reviving the jihad in order to avenge the death of the Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim[4] . References[edit]^ a b c Rita Pankhurst - Women of Power in Ethiopia: Struggle and Loss ^ Baynes-Rock, Marcus. Among the Bone Eaters
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Harari Language
Harari is the language of the Harari people
Harari people
of Ethiopia. It is an Afro-Asiatic language of the Semitic branch and is a member of the Ethiosemitic group. According to the 2007 Ethiopian census, it is spoken by 25,810 people. Most of its speakers are multilingual in Amharic
Amharic
and/or Eastern Oromo.[citation needed] Harari is closely related to the Eastern Gurage languages, Zay, and Silt'e, all of whom are linked to the now extinct Semitic Harla language.[3][4] Locals or natives of Harar
Harar
refer to it as Gēy Ritma or Gēy Sinan "language of the City" (Gēy is the word for how Harari speakers refer to Harar, whose name is an exonym).[5] Harari was originally written with a version of the Arabic
Arabic
script, then the Ethiopic script was adopted to write the language
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Fl.
Floruit (/ˈflɔːr(j)uɪt, ˈflɒr-/), abbreviated fl. (or occasionally, flor.), Latin
Latin
for "he/she flourished", denotes a date or period during which a person was known to have been alive or active.[1][2] In English, the word may also be used as a noun indicating the time when someone "flourished".[1] Etymology and use[edit] Latin: flōruit is the third-person singular perfect active indicative of the Latin
Latin
verb flōreō, flōrēre "to bloom, flower, or flourish", from the noun flōs, flōris, "flower".[3][2] Broadly, the term is employed in reference to the peak of activity for a person, movement, or such
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Zeila
Zeila
Zeila
(Somali: Saylac, Arabic: زيلع‎), also known as Zaila or Zeyla, is a port city in the northwestern Awdal
Awdal
region of Somaliland.[1] In the Middle Ages, the Jewish traveller Benjamin of Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
identified Zeila
Zeila
(or Zawilah) with the Biblical location of Havilah.[2] Most modern scholars identify it with the site of Avalites mentioned in the 1st-century Greco-Roman travelogue the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea and in Ptolemy, although this is not undisputed.[3][4] The town evolved into an early Islamic center with the arrival of Muslims shortly after the hegira
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Jihad
Jihad
Jihad
(English: /dʒɪˈhɑːd/; Arabic: جهاد‎ jihād [dʒɪˈhaːd]) is an Arabic
Arabic
word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim.[1][2][3][4] It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as s
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Ethiopia
Coordinates: 8°N 38°E / 8°N 38°E / 8; 38Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Ethiopia የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī RīpebilīkFlagEmblemAnthem:  ወደፊት ገስግሺ፣ ውድ እናት ኢትዮጵያ March Forward, Dear Mother EthiopiaCapital and largest city Addis Ababa 9°1′N 38°45′E / 9.017°N 38.750°E / 9.017; 38.750Official languages
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Muslim
65–75% Sunni
Sunni
Islam[22][note 1] 10–13% Shia
Shia
Islam[22] 15–20% Non-denominational Islam[23] ~1% Ahmadiyya[24] ~1% Other Muslim
Muslim
traditions, e.g
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Adal Sultanate
The Adal Sultanate, or Kingdom of Adal (alt. spelling Adel Sultanate), was a Muslim
Muslim
Sultanate
Sultanate
located in the Horn of Africa. It was founded by Sabr ad-Din II after the fall of the Sultanate
Sultanate
of Ifat.[4] The kingdom flourished from around 1415 to 1577.[5] The sultanate and state were established by the local inhabitants of Zeila.[6][7][8] At its height, the polity controlled most of the territory in the Horn region immediately east of the Ethiopian Empire
Ethiopian Empire
(Abyssinia)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Harari People
The Harari people
Harari people
(Arabic: هراري‎, Harari: ሐረሪ), also called Geyusu (Harari: ጌይኡሱእ) ("People of the City"), are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. Members traditionally reside in the city of Harar, situated in the Harari Region
Harari Region
of eastern Ethiopia
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Mahfuz
Mahfuz (or Mohammed) (Arabic: محفوظ‎, Harari: ማሕፉዝ) (died July 1517) was a Harari[1] Emir
Emir
of the city of Harar, and later a Governor of Zeila
Zeila
in the Adal Sultanate.[2]Contents1 Life and reign 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesLife and reign[edit] Mahfuz led raids into the eastern provinces of Abyssinia for a number of years. He selected the season of Lent
Lent
for his attacks, when the defenders were weakened by their fasts
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Harar
Harar
Harar
(Harari: ሐረር),[a] and known to its inhabitants as Gēy (Harari: ጌይ),[2] is a walled city in eastern Ethiopia. It was formerly the capital of Hararghe
Hararghe
and now the capital of the modern Harari Region
Harari Region
of Ethiopia. The city is located on a hilltop in the eastern extension of the Ethiopian Highlands, about five hundred kilometers from the national capital Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa
at an elevation of 1,885 meters
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Nur Ibn Mujahid
Nur ibn Mujahid ibn ‘Ali ibn ‘Abdullah al Dhuhi Suha (Harari አሚር ኑር, Somali: Nuur ibn Muujahiid, Arabic: نور بن مجاهد السمروني) (literally, "Light"; died 1567), of the Ahl Suhawyan branch of the Somali clan of Marehan. [1] He was known for marrying the widow of Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
(also known as Ahmed Gurey and Ahmad Gragn), he also succeeded Imam Ahmad as leader of the Muslim
Muslim
forces fighting Christian
Christian
Ethiopia.[2] Biography[edit] Considered a saint from Harar, Mujahid was called the Sahib al-Fath al-Thani, or "Master of the Second Conquest". When Imam Ahmad, who had led the Muslim
Muslim
conquest of the Ethiopian Highlands, was killed in 1543, the Muslim
Muslim
forces fell back in confusion to Harar
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Bati Del Wambara
Bati del Wambara (Harari: ባቲ ዲል ወምባራ, fl. 1531, literally Victory is her seat)[1] was the Harari[2] daughter of Mahfuz, Emir of Harar
Harar
in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and later Governor of Zeila. She married Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
and accompanied him in his jihad[3] to make Ethiopia
Ethiopia
a Muslim
Muslim
province.[1] During this expedition, she gave birth to two sons - Muhammad in 1531 and Ahmad in 1533.[1] After Imam ibn Ibrahim's death, she married the successive Emir of Adal, Nur ibn Mujahid. This was a political marriage aiming to enforce Nur's legitimacy. She is supposed to have pushed him into reviving the jihad in order to avenge the death of the Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim[4] . References[edit]^ a b c Rita Pankhurst - Women of Power in Ethiopia: Struggle and Loss ^ Baynes-Rock, Marcus. Among the Bone Eaters
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Ahmad Ibn Ibrahim Al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
(Somali: Axmad Ibraahim al-Gaasi, Harari: አሕመድ ኢቢን ኢብራሂም አል ጋዚ, "Acmad Ibni Ibrahim Al-Gaazi" [Afar], Arabic: أحمد بن إبراهيم الغازي‎ ) "the Conqueror"[2] (c
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