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Bartolomeo Eustachi
Bartolomeo Eustachi
Bartolomeo Eustachi
(1500 or 1514 – 27 August 1574), also known by his Latin
Latin
name of Eustachius (pronounced /juːˈsteɪʃəs/), was one of the founders of the science of human anatomy. Life[edit] He came from San Severino, near Macerata, Italy, and was a contemporary of Vesalius, with whom he shares the reputation of having created the science of human anatomy.Tabulae anatomicae (Rome, 1783) Table 21Tabulae anatomicae (Rome, 1783) Title pageHe is known as a supporter of Galen[1][2] and extended the knowledge of the internal ear by rediscovering and describing correctly the tube that bears his name. He is the first who described the internal and anterior muscles of the malleus and the stapedius, and the complicated figure of the cochlea. He is the first who studied accurately the anatomy of the teeth, and the phenomena of the first and second dentition
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Saint Eustace
Saint Eustace, also known as Eustachius or Eustathius in Latin,[1] is revered as a Christian martyr
Christian martyr
and soldier saint. Legend places him in the 2nd century AD. A martyr of that name is venerated as a saint in the Anglican Church.[2] He is commemorated by the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
on September 20.Contents1 Biography 2 Variants 3 Diffusion of his veneration 4 Modern connections 5 In culture5.1 Plays and dramas 5.2 Story behind logos6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 Gallery 10 External linksBiography[edit] According to tradition,[3] prior to his conversion to Christianity Eustace was a Roman general named Placidus, who served the emperor Trajan
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Istituto Centrale Per Il Catalogo Unico
The Central Institute for the Union Catalogue of Italian Libraries and for Bibliographic Information (in Italian: Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane e per le informazioni bibliografiche) is an Italian government agency that was created in 1975 to supersede the Centro nazionale per il catalogo unico (National Single Directory Center), that had in turn been created in 1951 to build a single catalog of all the libraries in the nation. The Institute today manages an ICT network called National Library Service (Servizio bibliotecario nazionale, or SBN); it is answerable to, and technical-scientific advisor for, the Direzione Generale per i Beni librari, gli Istituti culturali ed il Diritto d'autore (Department of books, cultural institutions and copyright) within the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. External links[edit]Official WebsiteThis government-related article is a stub
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Linda Hall Library
The Linda Hall Library
Library
is a privately endowed American library of science, engineering and technology located in Kansas City, Missouri, sitting "majestically on a 14-acre (5.7 ha) urban arboretum." [1] It is the "largest independently funded public library of science, engineering and technology in North America"[2] and "among the largest science libraries in the world."[1]Contents1 Description 2 Collections 3 Rare Book Collection 4 Grounds and arboretum 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Established in 1946 through the philanthropy of Linda (1859–1938) and Herbert F. Hall (1858–1941), of the Hall-Bartlett Grain Co.,[3] the library has achieved global recognition and stature. The library is open to the public with individual researchers, academic institutions and companies from Kansas City
Kansas City
and around the world using the library’s extensive research-level collection
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Catholic Encyclopedia
The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church,[1] also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia,[2] is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".[3][4] The Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
was published by the Robert Appleton Company (RAC), a publishing company incorporated at New York in February 1905 for the express purpose of publishing the encyclopedia
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Papal Library
Outline, Index Vatican City
Vatican City
portalv t eThe Vatican Apostolic Library
Library
(Latin: Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana), more commonly called the Vatican Library
Library
or simply the Vat,[1] is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history,[2] as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library
Library
is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology
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Microscopes
A microscope (from the Ancient Greek: μικρός, mikrós, "small" and σκοπεῖν, skopeîn, "to look" or "see") is an instrument used to see objects that are too small to be seen by the naked eye. Microscopy
Microscopy
is the science of investigating small objects and structures using such an instrument. Microscopic means invisible to the eye unless aided by a microscope. There are many types of microscopes, and they may be grouped in different ways. One way is to describe the way the instruments interact with a sample to create images, either by sending a beam of light or electrons to a sample in its optical path, or by scanning across, and a short distance from, the surface of a sample using a probe. The most common microscope (and the first to be invented) is the optical microscope, which uses light to pass through a sample to produce an image
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Vena Cava
The venae cavae (/ˈviːni ˈkeɪvi/;[1] from the Latin for "hollow veins", singular "vena cava" /ˈviːnə ˈkeɪvə/)[2] are two large veins (venous trunks) that return deoxygenated blood from the body into the heart. In humans there are the superior vena cava and the inferior vena cava, and both empty into the right atrium.[3] They are located slightly off-center, toward the right side of the body. The inferior vena cava (or caudal vena cava in some animals) travels up alongside the abdominal aorta with blood from the lower part of the body. It is the largest vein in the human body.[4] The superior vena cava (or cranial vena cava in animals) is above the heart, and forms from a convergence of the left and right brachiocephalic veins, which contain blood from the head and the arms. References[edit]^ Merriam-Webster, Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, Merriam-Webster.  ^ Cambridge Dictionary, Cambridge Dictionary, Cambridge Dictionary.  ^ vena cava. Dictionary.com
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Bonn
The Federal City of Bonn
Bonn
(German pronunciation: [ˈbɔn] ( listen)) is a city on the banks of the Rhine
Rhine
in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, with a population of over 300,000. About 24 km (15 mi) south-southeast of Cologne, Bonn
Bonn
is in the southernmost part of the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
region, Germany's largest metropolitan area, with over 11 million inhabitants. Because of a political compromise following German reunification, the German state maintains a substantial presence in Bonn, and the city is considered a second, unofficial, capital of the country.[2] Bonn
Bonn
is the secondary seat of the President, the Chancellor, the Bundesrat and the primary seat of six federal government ministries and twenty federal authorities
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