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Barons
Baron
Baron
is a title of honour, often hereditary. The female equivalent is baroness.Contents1 Etymology 2 Continental Europe2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Italy 2.4 The Low Countries 2.5 The Nordic Countries 2.6 Russia 2.7 Spain3 The United Kingdom and Ireland3.1 History 3.2 Irish Barons 3.3 Coronet 3.4 Style of address 3.5 Scottish feudal baronies3.5.1 Chapeau and helm 3.5.2 Style of address4 Other 5 See also 6 Sources 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word baron comes from the Old French
Old French
baron, from a Late Latin
Late Latin
baro "man; servant, soldier, mercenary" (so used in Salic Law; Alemannic Law has barus in the same sense)
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Lucius Annaeus Cornutus
Lucius Annaeus Cornutus (Greek: Ἀνναῖος Κορνοῦτος), a Stoic philosopher, flourished in the reign of Nero
Nero
(c. 60 AD), when his house in Rome
Rome
was a school of philosophy.Contents1 Life 2 Writings2.1 Compendium of Greek Theology 2.2 Spurious works3 Notes 4 External linksLife[edit] He was a native of Leptis Magna
Leptis Magna
in Libya, but resided for the most part in Rome. He is best known as the teacher and friend of Persius, whose fifth satire is addressed to him, as well as other distinguished students, such as Claudius Agathemerus.[1] "Through Cornutus Persius was introduced to Annaeus, as well as to Lucan, who was of his own age, and also a disciple of Cornutus".[2] At Persius' death, Cornutus returned to Persius' sisters a bequest made to him, but accepted Persius' library of some 700 scrolls
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Gentleman
In modern parlance, a gentleman (from gentle + man, translating the Old French
Old French
gentilz hom[1]) is any man of good, courteous conduct. A gentleman may also simply be a polite term for any man, as in indications of gender-separated facilities, or as a sign of the speaker's own courtesy when addressing others. The modern female equivalent is lady. Originally, a gentleman was a man of the lowest rank of the English gentry, standing below an esquire and above a yeoman. By definition, this category included the younger sons of the younger sons of peers and the younger sons of baronets, knights, and esquires in perpetual succession, and thus the term captures the common denominator of gentility (and often armigerousness) shared by both constituents of the English aristocracy: the peerage and the gentry
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Lady
The word lady is a civil term of respect for a woman among English speakers. It is the equivalent of gentleman. It is also a formal title in the United Kingdom. "Lady" is used before the surname of a woman with a title of nobility or honorary title suo jure, or the wife of a lord, a baronet, and a knight, and also before the first name of the daughter of a Duke, Marquess, or Earl
Earl
throughout the United Kingdom. Once used to describe only women of a high social class, race, community, and status in Europe; now the term is commonly used to refer to any adult woman among English-speakers globally
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Ritter
Ritter
Ritter
(German for "knight") is a designation used as a title of nobility in German-speaking areas. Traditionally it denotes the second-lowest rank within the nobility, standing above "Edler" and below "Freiherr" (Baron). For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". As with most titles and designations within the nobility in German-speaking areas, the rank was normally hereditary and generally was used with the nobiliary particle of von or zu before a family name. The wife of a Ritter
Ritter
was called a "Frau" (in this sense "Lady") and not Ritterin. In the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
the title of " Ritter
Ritter
von" was bestowed upon citizens who deserved more than the plain "von" but were not considered deserving enough as to be given a barony as "Freiherr"
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Ridder (title)
Ridder ([ˈrɪdər]; English: "Knight") is a noble title in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium. Traditionally it denotes the second lowest rank within the nobility, standing below Baron, but above the untitled nobility (Jonkheer) in these countries. "Ridder" is a literal translation of Latin Eques and originally meant "horseman" or "rider". For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". In the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium
Belgium
no female equivalent exists. The collective term for its holders in a certain area as an executive and legislative assembly is named the Ridderschap (e.g
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Knight
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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Dame
Dame
Dame
is an honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of knighthood in the British honours system and the systems of several other Commonwealth countries, such as Australia
Australia
and New Zealand, with the masculine form of address being Sir
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Knighthood
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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Laird
Laird
Laird
(/ˈlɛərd/) is a generic name for the owner of a large, long-established Scottish estate, roughly equivalent to an esquire in England, yet ranking above the same in Scotland. In the Scottish order of precedence, a laird ranks below a baron and above a gentleman. This rank is only held by those lairds holding official recognition in a territorial designation by the Lord
Lord
Lyon King
King
of Arms
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Edler
Edler
Edler
(German: [ˈeːdlɐ]) was until 1919 the lowest rank of nobility in Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
and Germany, just beneath a Ritter
Ritter
(hereditary knight), but above untitled nobles, who used only the nobiliary particle von before their surname. It was mostly given to civil servants and military officers, as well as those upon whom the lower rank of an Order had been conferred. The noun Edler
Edler
comes from the adjective edel ("noble"), and translated literally means "noble [person]". In accordance with the rules of German grammar, the word can also appear as Edle, Edlem, or Edlen depending on case, gender, and number. Originally, from the Middle Ages, under the feudal system (in Europe and elsewhere), the nobility were generally those who held a fief, often in the form of heritable land worked by vassals
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Jonkheer
Jonkheer
Jonkheer
(female equivalent: jonkvrouw; French: Écuyer) is a honorific in the Low Countries
Low Countries
denoting the lowest rank within the nobility. In the Netherlands, this in general concerns a prefix used by the untitled nobility. In Belgium, this is the lowest title within the nobility system, recognised by the Court of Cassation.[1][citation needed] It is the cognate and equivalent of the German noble honorific Junker, which was historically used throughout the German-speaking part of Europe, and to some extent also within Scandinavia.Contents1 Honorific
Honorific
of nobility 2 Title of nobility 3 Coronet 4 Nickname 5 See also 6 References Honorific
Honorific
of nobility[edit] Jonkheer
Jonkheer
or jonkvrouw is literally translated as "young lord" or "young lady"
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Younger (title)
Younger is a Scottish convention, style of address, or description traditionally used by the heir apparent to: 1. A current laird (owner of a substantial and landed estate in Scotland) 2. Someone whose name includes a territorial designation (i.e. a family who were previously lairds but who are no longer – this applies mainly to armigerous families who had a territorial designation which formed part of their name. Their arms being registered with the inclusion of the territorial designation, having become landless, still retain the full name – including the territorial designation – pertaining to the Grant of Arms) 3. A Scottish chieftainship (the head of a cadet branch of a clan which has a chief) 4. A clan chief. 5. A Scottish baron, only if also a laird (as above) and recognised by the Lord
Lord
Lyon as such.[1] The style of using the term "Younger" applies equally to a woman who is heir in her own right as to a man
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Baroness (other)
Baroness
Baroness
is a noble title and the female equivalent of Baron. Baroness
Baroness
or The Baroness
Baroness
may also refer to:The Baroness, the pen name of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven Raymonde "the Baroness" de Laroche (1882–1919), stunt pilot Baroness
Baroness
(band), a metal band from Savannah, Georgia Baroness
Baroness
(G.I. Joe), a fictional villain in the G.I
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Maid (title)
Maid is a title granted to the eldest daughter of a Laird. The title is not often used today but can still be used. The title is customary and not automatically given. The eldest daughter of a Laird
Laird
is entitled to place the title at the end of her name along with the Lairdship therefore becoming "Miss [Firstname] [Lastname], Maid of [Lairdship]." Only placing the word "Maid" at the end of the name is incorrect as the Lairdship must be included. As the title is customary and not automatic, it means that the eldest daughter can choose if they wish to take on this title, if they choose not to they are simply addressed as "Miss [Firstname] [Lastname] of [Lairdship]" If the eldest daughter is the heir apparent to a Lairdship, she has the choice to either take on the title "Younger" (see. Younger (title)) or to remain titled as "Maid of [x]"
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Title
A title is a prefix or suffix added to someone's name in certain contexts. It may signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. In some languages, titles may be inserted between the first and last name (for example, Graf
Graf
in German, Cardinal in Catholic usage (Richard Cardinal Cushing) or clerical titles such as Archbishop)
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