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Baron Slane
Baron Slane
Slane
was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1370 for the Fleming family but forfeited in 1691.Contents1 Origins 2 Peerage Case, 1835 3 New creation 4 Barons Slane
Slane
(created c. 1370) 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further reading 8 External linksOrigins[edit] The Flemings of Slane
Slane
descend from Archembald le Fleming of Bratton Fleming, Devon, who was alive in 1087. Archembald derived his surname due to his birth in Flanders, and came to England during the reign of William I. He was succeeded by his son, Stephen (fl. 1145), whose son, Archembald, arrived in Ireland with Henry II in 1171 and participated in Hugh de Lacy's plantation of the Kingdom of Mide
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Roll Of Arms
A roll of arms (or armorial) is a collection of coats of arms, usually consisting of rows of painted pictures of shields, each shield accompanied by the name of the person bearing the arms. The oldest extant armorials date to the mid 13th century, and armorial manuscripts continued to be produced throughout the Early Modern period. Siebmachers Wappenbuch
Siebmachers Wappenbuch
of 1605 was an early instance of a printed armorial. Medieval armorials usually include a few hundred coats of arms, in the late medieval period sometimes up to some 2,000. In the early modern period, the larger armorials develop into encyclopedic projects, with the Armorial général de France
France
(1696), commissioned by Louis XIV of France, listing more than 125,000 coats of arms
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Kingdom Of Mide
Meath (/ˈmiːð/; Old Irish: Mide Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈmʲiðʲe]; spelt Mí in Modern Irish) was a kingdom in Ireland for over 1000 years. Its name means "middle," denoting its location in the middle of the island. At its greatest extent, it included all of County Meath
County Meath
(which takes its name from the kingdom), all of Westmeath, and parts of Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Longford, Louth and Offaly.Contents1 History 2 Province and diocese 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Meath is traditionally said to have been created in the first century by Túathal Techtmar. The Uí Enechglaiss was an early dynasty of the region. An ogham stone found south of Slane
Slane
suggests they controlled that area in County Meath
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County Galway
County Galway (Irish: Contae na Gaillimhe) is a county in Ireland. Lying in the middle of the West of Ireland, it is part of the province of Connacht (English spelling: Connaught) and is named after the city of Galway. There are several Irish-speaking areas in the west of the county. The traditional county includes, and is named for, Galway city, but the city and county have separate local authorities - a city council administers the urban area, while the rest of the county is administered by Galway County Council. The population of the county is 258,552 according to the 2016 census.[1]Contents1 History 2 Irish language 3 Local government and politics 4 Geography4.1 Lakes 4.2 Climate 4.3 Flora and fauna 4.4 Largest settlements in County Galway (2011 Census)5 Economy 6 Sports 7 Towns and villages 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Dunguaire Castle, built c
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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William III Of England
William III (Dutch: Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702),[2] also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
from birth, Stadtholder
Stadtholder
of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland
Gelderland
and Overijssel
Overijssel
in the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702. It is a coincidence that his regnal number (III) was the same for both Orange and England. As King of Scotland, he is known as William II.[3] He is sometimes informally known in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and Scotland as "King Billy".[4] William inherited the principality of Orange from his father, William II, who died a week before William's birth. His mother, Mary, was the daughter of King Charles I of England
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Roman Catholic Archbishop Of Dublin
The Archbishop of Dublin (Irish: Ard-Easpag Bhaile Átha Cliath) is the title of the senior cleric who presides over the Archdiocese of Dublin. The Church of Ireland has a similar role, heading the United Dioceses of Dublin and Glendalough. In both cases, the Archbishop is also Primate of Ireland
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Roman Catholic Priest
The ministerial orders of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
(for similar but different rules among Eastern Catholics see Eastern Catholic Church) are those of bishop, presbyter (more commonly called priest in English), and deacon. The ordained priesthood and the common priesthood (or priesthood of all the baptized faithful) are different in function and essence.[1][2] The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that when a man participates in priesthood, he participates in the priesthood of Christ
Christ
Himself
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Roll Of Arms
A roll of arms (or armorial) is a collection of coats of arms, usually consisting of rows of painted pictures of shields, each shield accompanied by the name of the person bearing the arms. The oldest extant armorials date to the mid 13th century, and armorial manuscripts continued to be produced throughout the Early Modern period. Siebmachers Wappenbuch
Siebmachers Wappenbuch
of 1605 was an early instance of a printed armorial. Medieval armorials usually include a few hundred coats of arms, in the late medieval period sometimes up to some 2,000. In the early modern period, the larger armorials develop into encyclopedic projects, with the Armorial général de France
France
(1696), commissioned by Louis XIV of France, listing more than 125,000 coats of arms
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Trim, County Meath
Trim (Irish: Baile Átha Troim, meaning "town at the ford of elderflowers")[3] is a town in County Meath, Ireland. It is situated on the River Boyne
River Boyne
and has a population of 9,194. The town is noted for Trim Castle
Trim Castle
- the largest Cambro-Norman
Cambro-Norman
castle in Ireland. One of the two cathedrals of the United Dioceses of Meath and Kildare — St Patrick's cathedral — is located north of the river. Trim won the Irish Tidy Towns Competition
Irish Tidy Towns Competition
in 1972, 1984, and 2014 and was the "joint" winner with Ballyconnell
Ballyconnell
in 1974
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FitzMartin
FitzMartin
FitzMartin
was the surname of a Norman family based in England
England
and Wales
Wales
between 1085 and 1342. The earliest progenitor of this family is shown in the charter of his son, Robert, to the monks at Montacute, around 1121, wherein are given the names of Robert's parents, Martin and Geva. Little else is known of this Martin, but his wife Geva is known to have been the daughter and heiress of Serlo de Burci. Thus, Geva de Burci brought the lands of her father to her marriage, which included Low Ham, Pylle, and Hornblotton. By her second marriage to William de Falaise, which had occurred by 1086, she was to pass to her son and heir, Robert, additional land in Devonshire
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Motte And Bailey
A motte-and-bailey castle is a fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised earthwork called a motte, accompanied by an enclosed courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade. Relatively easy to build with unskilled, often forced, labour, but still militarily formidable, these castles were built across northern Europe from the 10th century onwards, spreading from Normandy
Normandy
and Anjou
Anjou
in France, into the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
in the 11th century. The Normans
Normans
introduced the design into England
England
and Wales following their invasion in 1066. Motte-and-bailey castles were adopted in Scotland, Ireland, the Low Countries
Low Countries
and Denmark
Denmark
in the 12th and 13th centuries
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Hugh De Lacy, Lord Of Meath
Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath, 4th Baron Lacy (born before 1135, died 25 July 1186), was an Anglo-Norman landowner and royal office-holder. He had substantial land holdings in Herefordshire
Herefordshire
and Shropshire, England. Following his participation in the Norman Invasion of Ireland, he was granted, in 1172, the lands of the Kingdom of Meath
Kingdom of Meath
by the Anglo-Norman King Henry II, but he had to gain control of them. The Lordship of Meath
Lordship of Meath
was then the most extensive liberty in Ireland.Contents1 Early life 2 Career in Ireland 3 Lordship of Meath 4 Death, aftermath and legacy 5 Ancestry 6 Marriage and Issue 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Hugh de Lacy was the son of Gilbert de Lacy
Gilbert de Lacy
(died after 1163) of Ewyas Lacy, Weobley, and Ludlow
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Henry II Of England
Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (French: Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also controlled Wales, Scotland
Scotland
and Brittany. Henry was the son of Geoffrey of Anjou
Anjou
and Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England. He became actively involved by the age of 14 in his mother's efforts to claim the throne of England, then occupied by Stephen of Blois, and was made Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
at 17
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William I Of England
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Flanders
Flanders
Flanders
(Dutch: Vlaanderen [ˈvlaːndərə(n)] ( listen), French: Flandre [flɑ̃dʁ], German: Flandern, [flɑndɛɹn]) is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium, although there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history. It is one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. The demonym associated with Flanders
Flanders
is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish
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