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Baron Saye And Sele
Baron
Baron
Saye and Sele is a title in the Peerage of England held by the Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes family. The title dates to 1447 but it was recreated in 1603. Confusion over the details of the 15th-century title has led to conflicting order for title holders; authorities such as Burke's Peerage
Burke's Peerage
and Debrett's Peerage
Debrett's Peerage
do not agree on whether or not the 1447 creation is still extant.[1]Contents1 History 2 List of titleholders2.1 Lord Saye (1313) 2.2 Lord (Baron) Saye and Sele (1447) 2.3 Baron
Baron
Saye and Sele (1603) 2.4 Viscount Saye and Sele (1624) 2.5 Barons Saye and Sele (1603; reverted)3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Saye (also spelt Say) family is an ancient one. According to the Roman de Rou, a "le sire de Saye" took part in the Norman conquest in 1087,[2] after which they gained prominence and land
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Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Libertatum ( Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
for "the Great Charter
Charter
of the Liberties"), commonly called Magna Carta
Magna Carta
(also Magna Charta; "Great Charter"),[a] is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.[b] First drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
to make peace between the unpopular King and a group of rebel barons, it promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown, to be implemented through a council of 25 barons. Neither side stood behind their commitments, and the charter was annulled by Pope Innocent III, leading to the First Barons' War
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Geoffrey De Saye
Geoffrey de Saye
Geoffrey de Saye
(1155–1230) was an English nobleman, and a Magna Carta surety. He held land at Edmonton[1] and Sawbridgeworth.[2][3] He had family claims to larger estates, but they had gone to the kinsman Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex. de Saye was a Magna Carta
Magna Carta
surety and bore the arms Quarterly, or and gules. Family[edit] Geoffrey was the son of Geoffrey de Saye, Lord of West Greenwich (1135–1214). Geoffrey de Saye, II, Lord of West Greenwich was born in 1155 in West Greenwich, Kent, England. He died 24 Aug 1230 in Gascoigne, Poitou, France
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Joan Dacre, 7th Baroness Dacre
Joan Dacre, 7th Baroness Dacre (c. 1433[1] – 8 March 1486) was a suo jure peeress of England. She was born in Gilsland, the daughter of Sir Thomas Dacre (1410–1448) and Elizabeth Bowett. Marriage[edit] Joan Dacre married Sir Richard Fiennes in June 1446. Joan Dacre succeeded her grandfather Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre, to the Barony of Dacre suo jure on 5 January 1457/58.[2] Her husband Sir Richard was titled Baron Dacre, by right of his wife, and awarded the Dacre manors as the result of the attainder of her uncles following the Battle of Towton. Later, a dispute arose between Sir Richard and Humphrey Dacre, Joan's uncle, regarding the barony. King Edward IV decided the matter in 1473, by confirming the Barony of Dacre to Sir Richard Fiennes and Joan, while the manor of Gilsland
Gilsland
was adjudged to Humphrey, who had previously been liberated of the attainder
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Baron
Baron
Baron
is a title of honour, often hereditary. The female equivalent is baroness.Contents1 Etymology 2 Continental Europe2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Italy 2.4 The Low Countries 2.5 The Nordic Countries 2.6 Russia 2.7 Spain3 The United Kingdom and Ireland3.1 History 3.2 Irish Barons 3.3 Coronet 3.4 Style of address 3.5 Scottish feudal baronies3.5.1 Chapeau and helm 3.5.2 Style of address4 Other 5 See also 6 Sources 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word baron comes from the Old French
Old French
baron, from a Late Latin
Late Latin
baro "man; servant, soldier, mercenary" (so used in Salic Law; Alemannic Law has barus in the same sense)
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William Of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
(/ˈwɪkəm/; 1320 or 1324 – 27 September 1404) was Bishop of Winchester
Bishop of Winchester
and Chancellor of England. He founded New College Oxford
New College Oxford
and New College School
New College School
in 1379, and founded Winchester College
Winchester College
in 1382. He was also the clerk of works when much of Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle
was built.Contents1 Early life 2 Builder 3 State administrator under Edward III 4 Richard II 5 Citations 6 References 7 Further readingEarly life[edit] William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
(born William Longe), a member of the Hampshire Longe family, was the son of John Longe, a freeman from Wickham
Wickham
in Hampshire
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Herstmonceux Castle
Herstmonceux
Herstmonceux
Castle
Castle
is a brick-built castle, dating from the 15th century, near Herstmonceux, East Sussex, England. From 1957 to 1988 its grounds were the home of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich
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Hundred Years' War
House of Valois Kingdom of France Duchy of Burgundy[1] Duchy of Brittany[2] (County of Flanders)*[3] Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of Bohemia Duchy of Lorraine Republic of Genoa Crown of Castile Crown of Aragon Kingdom of Majorca Avignon Papacy[4] House of Plantagenet Kingdom of England Principality of Wales Duchy of Aquitaine English Kingdom of France[5] Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Hainaut Duchy of Brittany[6] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Navarre Papal States[7]Commanders and leaders Philip VI (1337–1350) John II (1350–1364) Charles V (1364–1380) Charles VI (1380–1422) Charles VII (1422–1453) Edward III
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Treasurer Of The Household
The Treasurer of the Household is a member of the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. The position is usually held by one of the government deputy Chief Whips in the House of Commons. He was a member of the Board of Green Cloth, until the Board of Green Cloth disappeared in the reform of local government licensing in 2004, brought about by the Licensing Act 2003
Licensing Act 2003
(section 195). The position had its origin in the office of Keeper of the Wardrobe of the Household and was ranked second after the Lord Steward. On occasion (e.g. 1488–1503) the office was vacant for a considerable period and its duties undertaken by the Cofferer. The office was often staffed by the promotion of the Comptroller and was normally held by a commoner (except in 1603–1618 and 1641–1645 when it was occupied by peers). The Treasurer was automatically a member of the privy council
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Liberal Party (UK)
The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom—with the opposing Conservative Party—in the nineteenth and early twentieth century.[2] The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s. By the end of the nineteenth century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1906 with a landslide victory. It passed the welfare reforms that created a basic British welfare state. Liberal H. H. Asquith
H. H. Asquith
was Prime Minister from 1908 to 1916, followed by David Lloyd George
David Lloyd George
from 1916 to 1922
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H.H. Asquith
Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC, KC, FRS (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928), generally known as H. H. Asquith, was a British statesman of the Liberal Party who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
from 1908 to 1916. He was the last Prime Minister to lead a majority Liberal government and played a central role in the design and passage of major liberal legislation. In August 1914, Asquith took the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
into the First World War, but resigned amid political conflict in December 1916 and was succeeded by his War Secretary, David Lloyd George. Asquith's father owned a small business but died when Asquith was seven. Asquith was educated at City of London School
City of London School
and Balliol College, Oxford. He trained as a barrister and after a slow start to his career achieved great success
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Feudal Baron
Historically, feudal barons were the king's tenants-in-chief, that is to say men who held land by feudal tenure directly from the king as their sole overlord and were granted by him a legal jurisdiction (court baron) over their territory, the barony, comprising several manors. Such men, if not already noblemen,[1] were ennobled by obtaining such tenure, and had thenceforth an obligation, upon summons by writ, to attend the king's peripatetic court, the earliest form of Parliament
Parliament
and the House of Lords
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Conquest Of Wales By Edward I Of England
The Conquest of Wales
Wales
by Edward I, sometimes referred to as the Edwardian Conquest of Wales,[note 1] took place between 1277 and 1283. It resulted in the defeat and annexation of the Principality of Wales, and the other last remaining independent Welsh principalities, by Edward I, King of England. By the 13th century Wales
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Edward I Of England
Edward
Edward
I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England
King of England
from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward.[1] He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward
Edward
investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. As the first son of Henry III, Edward
Edward
was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford
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Treaty Of York
The Treaty
Treaty
of York
York
was an agreement between the kings Henry III of England
England
and Alexander II of Scotland, signed at York
York
on 25 September 1237, which affirmed that Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmorland were subject to English sovereignty. This established the Anglo-Scottish border
Anglo-Scottish border
in a form that remains almost unchanged to modern times (the only modifications have been regarding the Debatable Lands and Berwick-upon-Tweed).[1] The treaty detailed the future status of several feudal properties and addressed other issues between the two kings, and historically marked the end of the Kingdom of Scotland's attempts to extend its frontier southward. The treaty was one of a number of agreements made in the ongoing relationship between the two kings
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Henry III Of England
Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272), also known as Henry of Winchester, was King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine from 1216 until his death.[1] The son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, Henry assumed the throne when he was only nine in the middle of the First Barons' War. Cardinal Guala declared the war against the rebel barons to be a religious crusade and Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217. Henry promised to abide by the Great Charter of 1225, which limited royal power and protected the rights of the major barons. His early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh and then Peter des Roches, who re-established royal authority after the war. In 1230, the King attempted to reconquer the provinces of France that had once belonged to his father, but the invasion was a debacle
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