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Baron Ruthven Of Gowrie
Baron Ruthven of Gowrie, of Gowrie in the County of Perth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, held by the Earl of Gowrie
Earl of Gowrie
since 1956. It was created in 1919 for Walter Hore-Ruthven, 9th Lord Ruthven of Freeland, in the Peerage of Scotland (see Lord Ruthven of Freeland for earlier history of the Hore-Ruthven family). He was succeeded by his eldest son and namesake, Walter, the tenth Lord and second Baron. On the tenth Lord's death in 1956 the Scottish Lordship of Parliament and British barony separated. The Lordship, which could be passed on through female lines, devolved on his eldest daughter, Bridget, while the British barony, which could only be passed on through male lines, devolved on his great-nephew, Grey Ruthven, 2nd Earl of Gowrie. Lord Gowrie was the grandson of Alexander Hore-Ruthven, 1st Earl of Gowrie, second son of the ninth Lord Ruthven of Freeland
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Peerage Of The United Kingdom
The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland
Peerage of Ireland
until 1898 (the last creation being the Barony of Curzon of Kedleston).Contents1 Ranks 2 Titles 3 Lists of peers 4 Publications 5 See also 6 ReferencesRanks[edit] The ranks of the peerage are duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron.[1] The last non-royal dukedom was created in 1900, and the last marquessate in 1936. Creation of the remaining ranks mostly ceased once Harold Wilson's Labour government took office in 1964, and only four non-royal hereditary peerages have been created since then
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Earl Of Gowrie
Earl of Gowrie
Gowrie
is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Scotland and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, both times for members of the Ruthven family. It takes its name from Gowrie, a historical region and ancient province of Scotland. On 23 August 1581, William Ruthven, 4th Lord Ruthven, was created Earl of Gowrie
Gowrie
by James VI, King of the Scots. He was executed for high treason, attainted and his peerages forfeited on 28 May 1584. Two years later in 1586, the attainder was reversed and his son, the second Earl, was restored as Earl of Gowrie
Gowrie
and Lord Ruthven, but both peerages were forfeited after the alleged plot and subsequent death of the second Earl's younger brother, the third Earl, in 1600. The Ruthven family descended from Sir William Ruthven, who was created Lord Ruthven in the Peerage of Scotland in 1488
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Peerage Of Scotland
The Peerage of Scotland
Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Moraireachd na h-Alba) is the section of the Peerage of the British Isles for those peers created by the King of Scots
King of Scots
before 1707. Following that year's Treaty of Union, the Kingdom of Scots and the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
were combined under the name of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced in which subsequent titles were created. After the Union, the Peers of the ancient Parliament of Scotland elected 16 representative peers to sit in the House of Lords
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Lord Ruthven Of Freeland
Lord Ruthven of Freeland is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1651 for Thomas Ruthven. He was the grandson of Alexander Ruthven, younger son of William Ruthven, 2nd Lord Ruthven (see the Earl of Gowrie, 1581 creation, for earlier history of the family). The letters patent creating the peerage is said to have been burnt with the House of Freeland in 1750, and the remainder to the peerage is not accurately known. However, as the dignity was retained on the Union Roll, it has been presumed that the honour was to heirs-general. Lord Ruthven of Freeland was succeeded by his son, the second Lord. He never married and on his death in 1722 the title and estates devolved by entail upon his youngest sister, Jean. On her death the estates passed to her nephew Sir William Cunningham, 3rd Baronet, of Cunninghamhead. He was the only son of Anne, elder sister of the third Lady Ruthven and also heir of line
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Lordship Of Parliament
A Lord of Parliament
Lord of Parliament
(Scots: Laird
Laird
o Pairlament) was the holder of the lowest form of peerage entitled as of right to take part in sessions of the pre-Union Parliament of Scotland. Since that Union in 1707, it has been the lowest rank of the Peerage of Scotland, ranking below a viscount. A Lord of Parliament
Lord of Parliament
is said to hold a Lordship
Lordship
of Parliament. The peerage of Scotland
Scotland
differs from those of England, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, in that its lowest rank is not that of baron. In Scotland, the term "baron" refers to a feudal baron, considered to be a minor lord who is not a peer, approximately equal to a baron in some continental countries
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Bridget Monckton, 11th Lady Ruthven Of Freeland
Bridget Helen "Biddy" Monckton, 11th Lady Ruthven of Freeland CBE (27 July 1896–17 April 1982), also known as The Countess of Carlisle between 1918 and 1947, as Lady Monckton between 1947 and 1957, as The Viscountess Monckton of Brenchley between 1957 and 1965 and as The Dowager Viscountess Monckton of Brenchley between 1965 and 1982, was a British peer and Conservative member of the House of Lords, but is probably best remembered as the wartime commander of women's services in India.Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Military career 4 Remarriage 5 Career 6 Peerage 7 Death 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Grey Ruthven, 2nd Earl Of Gowrie
Alexander Patrick Greysteil Ruthven, 2nd Earl of Gowrie, PC, FRSL (born in Dublin 26 November 1939), usually known as Grey Gowrie, is a Scottish hereditary peer. He was a Conservative Party politician for some years, including a period in the British Cabinet, and was later Chairman of Sotheby's and of the Arts Council of England. He has also published poetry. Lord Gowrie is the hereditary Clan Chief of Clan Ruthven.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Titles 1.3 Ireland and Wales 1.4 Political career 1.5 Later career2 Writings 3 Personal life3.1 Family 3.2 Friends4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Early life and education[edit] Ruthven was born in Dublin, Ireland,[1] the elder son of Major the Honourable Patrick Hore-Ruthven, only surviving son of the 1st Baron Gowrie and his wife Lady Gowrie
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Alexander Hore-Ruthven, 1st Earl Of Gowrie
Sudan CampaignSomaliland Campaign First World War Gallipoli Campaign Western FrontAwards Victoria Cross Companion of the Order of the Bath Distinguished Service Order
Distinguished Service Order
& Bar Mentioned in Despatches
Mentioned in Despatches
(7)Brigadier General Alexander Gore Arkwright Hore-Ruthven, 1st Earl of Gowrie VC, GCMG, CB, DSO & Bar, PC (/ˈhɔːr ˈrɪvɛn/; 6 July 1872 – 2 May 1955) was a British Army
British Army
officer who served as the tenth Governor-General of Australia, in office from 1936 to 1945. He was previously Governor of South Australia
Governor of South Australia
(1928 to 1934) and Governor of New South Wales (1935 to 1936). Gowrie was born in Windsor, Berkshire, England, into a minor aristocratic family. He joined a voluntary Yeomanry
Yeomanry
unit at the age of 17, and then enlisted in the regular army at the age of 19
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Dean Cemetery
The Dean Cemetery
Dean Cemetery
is a historically important Victorian cemetery north of the Dean Village, west of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
city centre, in Scotland. It lies between Queensferry Road and the Water of Leith, bounded on its east side by Dean Path and on its west by the Dean Gallery. A 20th-century extension lies detached from the main cemetery to the north of Ravelston Terrace. The main cemetery is accessible through the main gate on its east side, through a "grace and favour" access door from the grounds of Dean Gallery
Dean Gallery
and from Ravelston Terrace
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Walter Hore-Ruthven, 10th Lord Ruthven Of Freeland
Major General Walter Patrick Hore-Ruthven, 10th Lord Ruthven of Freeland, 2nd Baron Ruthven of Gowrie, CB, CMG, DSO (6 June 1870 – 16 April 1956), known as Master of Ruthven from 1870 to 1921, was a senior British Army
British Army
officer
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Baron Ruthven Of Gowrie
Baron Ruthven of Gowrie, of Gowrie in the County of Perth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, held by the Earl of Gowrie
Earl of Gowrie
since 1956. It was created in 1919 for Walter Hore-Ruthven, 9th Lord Ruthven of Freeland, in the Peerage of Scotland (see Lord Ruthven of Freeland for earlier history of the Hore-Ruthven family). He was succeeded by his eldest son and namesake, Walter, the tenth Lord and second Baron. On the tenth Lord's death in 1956 the Scottish Lordship of Parliament and British barony separated. The Lordship, which could be passed on through female lines, devolved on his eldest daughter, Bridget, while the British barony, which could only be passed on through male lines, devolved on his great-nephew, Grey Ruthven, 2nd Earl of Gowrie. Lord Gowrie was the grandson of Alexander Hore-Ruthven, 1st Earl of Gowrie, second son of the ninth Lord Ruthven of Freeland
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