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Barnstorming
Barnstorming
Barnstorming
was a form of entertainment in which stunt pilots performed tricks, either individually or in groups called flying circuses
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Calvin Coolidge
John Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge
Jr. (/ˈkuːlɪdʒ/; July 4, 1872 – January
January
5, 1933) was an American politician and the 30th President of the United States (1923–1929). A Republican lawyer from New England, born in Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state. His response to the Boston Police Strike
Boston Police Strike
of 1919
1919
thrust him into the national spotlight and gave him a reputation as a man of decisive action. Soon after, he was elected as the 29th Vice President in 1920, and succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923
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Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
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Jazz Age
The Jazz
Jazz
Age was a period in the 1920s
1920s
and 1930s
1930s
in which jazz music and dance styles rapidly gained nationwide popularity. The Jazz
Jazz
Age's cultural repercussions were primarily felt in the United States, the birthplace of jazz. Originating in New Orleans
New Orleans
as a fusion of African and European music, jazz played a significant part in wider cultural changes in this period, and its influence on pop culture continued long afterwards. The Jazz
Jazz
Age is often referred to in conjunction with the Roaring Twenties. American author F. Scott Fitzgerald
F. Scott Fitzgerald
is widely credited with coining the term, first using it in the title of his 1922 short story collection, Tales of the Jazz
Jazz
Age
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U.S. Army Air Service
Service
Service
may refer to:Contents1 Activities 2 Economics and business 3 Arts and entertainment 4 Religion 5 Technology5.1 Computing and telecommunication 5.2 Other uses in technology6 Other uses 7 See alsoActivities[edit]Administrative service, a part of the work load of university faculty Civil service, the body of employees of a government Community service, volunteer service for the benefit of a community or a punishment that may be imposed by a court Customer service, provision of assistance to customers or clients Domestic service, employment in a residence Fan service, a Japanese term referring to so
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U.S. Post Office
The United States
United States
Postal Service (USPS; also known as the Post Office, U.S. Mail, or Postal Service) is an independent agency of the United States federal government responsible for providing postal service in the United States, including its insular areas and associated states. It is one of the few government agencies explicitly authorized by the United States
United States
Constitution. The U.S. Mail
Mail
traces its roots to 1775 during the Second Continental Congress, when Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
was appointed the first postmaster general. The Post Office Department was created in 1792 from Franklin's operation, elevated to a cabinet-level department in 1872, and transformed in 1971 into the U.S. Postal Service as an independent agency. The USPS as of February 2015 has 617,254 active employees and operated 211,264 vehicles in 2014
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Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
(/wɪˈskɒnsɪn/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota
Minnesota
to the west, Iowa
Iowa
to the southwest, Illinois
Illinois
to the south, Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior
Lake Superior
to the north. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan
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U.S. Commerce Department
The United States Department of Commerce
United States Department of Commerce
is the Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. Among its tasks are gathering economic and demographic data for business and government decision-making, and helping to set industrial standards. This organization's main purpose is to create jobs, promote economic growth, encourage sustainable development and improve standards of living for all Americans.[3] The Department of Commerce headquarters is the Herbert C. Hoover Building
Herbert C

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AeroSuperBatics Ltd
AeroSuperBatics Ltd is a British aerobatics and wingwalking team. As of 2011, they perform as the Breitling Wingwalkers following a sponsorship agreement with the Swiss watch manufacturer Breitling. They previously performed as Team Guinot, the Utterly Butterly Wing-walking Display Team and the Crunchie Wing-walking Display Team according to their sponsors at the time. AeroSuperBatics was founded in 1989 by Vic Norman, a veteran aerobatics pilot. It operates four Boeing-Stearman Model 75 biplanes and employs five pilots. The team's shows consist of two or four planes performing aerobatic manoeuvres while female athletes, attached to a post above the wings, engage in acrobatics.[1] References[edit]^ Wheeler, Sara (10 March 2007). "Walking in the air". The Daily Telegraph
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Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
(/ˌmɪnɪˈsoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and northern regions of the United States. Minnesota
Minnesota
was admitted as the 32nd U.S. state
U.S. state
on May 11, 1858, created from the eastern half of the Minnesota
Minnesota
Territory. The state has a large number of lakes, and is known by the slogan "Land of 10,000 Lakes". Its official motto is L'Étoile du Nord
L'Étoile du Nord
(French: Star of the North). Minnesota
Minnesota
is the 12th largest in area and the 22nd most populous of the U.S
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Vintage
Vintage, in winemaking, is the process of picking grapes and creating the finished product (see Harvest (wine)). A vintage wine is one made from grapes that were all, or primarily, grown and harvested in a single specified year. In certain wines, it can denote quality, as in Port wine, where Port houses make and declare vintage Port in their best years. From this tradition, a common, though incorrect, usage applies the term to any wine that is perceived to be particularly old or of a particularly high quality. Most countries allow a vintage wine to include a portion of wine that is not from the year denoted on the label. In Chile and South Africa, the requirement is 75% same-year content for vintage-dated wine.[1][2] In Australia, New Zealand, and the member states of the European Union, the requirement is 85%.[3][4][5] In the United States, the requirement is 85%, unless the wine is designated with an AVA, (e.g., Napa Valley), in which case it is 95%
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Civil Aviation
Civil aviation
Civil aviation
is one of two major categories of flying, representing all non-military aviation, both private and commercial. Most of the countries in the world are members of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and work together to establish common standards and recommended practices for civil aviation through that agency. Civil aviation
Civil aviation
includes two major categories:Scheduled air transport, including all passenger and cargo flights operating on regularly scheduled routes; and General aviation
General aviation
(GA), including all other civil flights, private or commercialAlthough scheduled air transport is the larger operation in terms of passenger numbers, GA is larger in the number of flights (and flight hours, in the U.S.[1]) In the U.S., GA carries 166 million passengers each year,[2] more than any individual airline, though less than all the airlines combined
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Cockpit
A cockpit or flight deck is the area, usually near the front of an aircraft or spacecraft, from which a pilot controls the aircraft. Cockpit
Cockpit
of an Antonov An-124 Cockpit
Cockpit
of an A380. Most Airbus cockpits are glass cockpits featuring fly-by-wire technology.Swiss HB-IZX Saab 2000
Saab 2000
during flightRobin DR4001936 de Havilland Hornet MothThe cockpit of an aircraft contains flight instruments on an instrument panel, and the controls that enable the pilot to fly the aircraft. In most airliners, a door separates the cockpit from the aircraft cabin
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Flyer (pamphlet)
A flyer is a form of paper advertisement intended for wide distribution and typically posted or distributed in a public place, handed out to individuals or sent through the mail
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Aerobatic Maneuver
Aerobatic maneuvers are flight paths putting aircraft in unusual attitudes, in air shows, dogfights or competition aerobatics. Aerobatics
Aerobatics
can be performed by a single aircraft or in formation with several others. Nearly all aircraft are capable of performing aerobatics maneuvers of some kind, although it may not be legal or safe to do so in certain aircraft. Aerobatics
Aerobatics
consist of five basic maneuvers: Lines (both horizontal and vertical), loops, rolls, spins, and hammerheads. Most aerobatic figures are composites of these basic maneuvers with rolls superimposed. A loop is when the pilot pulls the plane up into the vertical, continues around until he is heading back in the same direction, like making a 360 degree turn, except it is in the vertical plane instead of the horizontal. The pilot will be inverted (upside down) at the top of the loop
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Barrel Roll
A barrel roll is an aerial maneuver in which an airplane makes a complete rotation on both its longitudinal and lateral axes, causing it to follow a helical path, approximately maintaining its original direction. It is sometimes described as a "combination of a loop and a roll."[1] The g-force is kept positive (but not constant) on the object throughout the maneuver, commonly between 2–3 g, and no less than 0.5 g
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