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Barnes Rail Crash
The Barnes rail crash, in which 13 people were killed and 41 were injured, occurred at Barnes railway station
Barnes railway station
late in the evening of 2 December 1955.[1]Contents1 Events 2 Causes2.1 Signalling 2.2 Electrical3 Casualties 4 References 5 NotesEvents[edit] The 23:12 electric passenger train travelling from Waterloo to Windsor and Chertsey collided with the rear of a LMS class 8 2-8-0 hauled freight train from Herne Hill to Brent at about 35 mph. The wreckage from the passenger train short-circuited the third rail and electrical arcing started a fire in the wooden coach frames; the leading coach of the passenger train was burnt out. The coaches were classified as 2-NOL and were converted in the 1930s from old LSWR steam carriages.[2] Causes[edit] Signalling[edit] The accident was caused by irregular operation of the block apparatus by the signalman at Barnes Junction
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Signalman (rail)
A signalman or signaller is an employee of a railway transport network who operates the points and signals from a signal box in order to control the movement of trains.Contents1 History 2 Additional duties 3 Duties today 4 Health 5 Other names 6 Train
Train
Controllers6.1 Method of working 6.2 Power signal boxes6.2.1 New South Wales7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The first signalmen, originally called Railway Policemen (leading to the nickname of 'Bobby'), were employed in the early 19th century and used flags to communicate with each other and train drivers, and hourglasses fo
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Arcing
An electric arc, or arc discharge, is an electrical breakdown of a gas that produces an ongoing electrical discharge. The current through a normally nonconductive medium such as air produces a plasma; the plasma may produce visible light. An arc discharge is characterized by a lower voltage than a glow discharge and relies on thermionic emission of electrons from the electrodes supporting the arc. An archaic term is voltaic arc, as used in the phrase "voltaic arc lamp". Techniques for arc suppression can be used to reduce the duration or likelihood of arc formation. In the late 1800s, electric arc lighting was in wide use for public lighting. Some low-pressure electric arcs are used in many applications
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HMSO
The Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) is the body responsible for the operation of Her Majesty's Stationery
Stationery
Office (usually abbreviated as HMSO) and of other public information services of the United Kingdom. OPSI is part of the National Archives of the United Kingdom and it is responsible for Crown copyright. OPSI announced on 21 June 2006 that it was merging with the National Archives. This merger took place in October 2006. OPSI continues to discharge its roles and responsibilities from within the structure of the National Archives.Contents1 Controller of HMSO and Director of OPSI 2 History 3 Published works 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksController of HMSO and Director of OPSI[edit] The Controller of HMSO is also the Director of OPSI. HMSO continues to operate from within the expanded remit of OPSI
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Ampere
The ampere (/ˈæmpɪər, æmˈpɪər/;[1] symbol: A),[2] often shortened to "amp",[3] is the base unit of electric current in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI).[4][5] It is named after André-Marie Ampère
André-Marie Ampère
(1775–1836), French mathematician and physicist, considered the father of electrodynamics. The International System of Units
International System of Units
defines the ampere in terms of other base units by measuring the electromagnetic force between electrical conductors carrying electric current. The earlier CGS measurement system had two different definitions of current, one essentially the same as the SI's and the other using electric charge as the base unit, with the unit of charge defined by measuring the force between two charged metal plates
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Circuit Breaker
A circuit breaker is an automatically operated electrical switch designed to protect an electrical circuit from damage caused by excess current from an overload or short circuit. Its basic function is to interrupt current flow after a fault is detected. Unlike a fuse, which operates once and then must be replaced, a circuit breaker can be reset (either manually or automatically) to resume normal operation. Circuit breakers are made in varying sizes, from small devices that protect low-current circuits or individual household appliance, up to large switchgear designed to protect high voltage circuits feeding an entire city
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British Absolute Block Signalling
Absolute block signalling is a British signalling scheme designed to ensure the safe operation of a railway by allowing only one train to occupy a defined section of track (block) at any time.[1] This system is used on double or multiple lines where use of each line is assigned a direction of travel. A train approaching a section is offered by a signalman to his counterpart at the next signal box. If the section is clear, the latter accepts the train, and the first signalman may clear his signals to give permission for the train to enter the section. This communication traditionally takes place by bell codes and status indications transmitted over a simple wire circuit between signalmen using a device called a block instrument, although some contemporary block working is operated wirelessly
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LSWR
The London and South Western Railway (LSWR) was a railway company in England from 1838 to 1922. Starting as the London and Southampton Railway, its network extended from London to Plymouth via Salisbury and Exeter, with branches to Ilfracombe and Padstow and via Southampton to Bournemouth and Weymouth. It also had many routes connecting towns in Hampshire and Berkshire, including Portsmouth and Reading
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Third Rail
A third rail is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track. It is used typically in a mass transit or rapid transit system, which has alignments in its own corridors, fully or almost fully segregated from the outside environment
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Brent Sidings
Brent sidings was an important marshalling yard and freight facility on the Midland Railway extension to London.Contents1 History 2 Coal traffic 3 Locomotives 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The sidings were situated on both sides of the Midland Main Line between Cricklewood and Welsh Harp stations,[1] close to the triangle formed where the Dudding Hill Line left the main line. When the line from the midlands was quadrupled, the two eastern tracks were used by goods trains; to enable these to reach Brent sidings, a flyover was provided at Silkstream Junction, north of Hendon.[2] Coal traffic[edit] Coal trains, each consisting of up to 85 wagons, were despatched from the marshalling yards at Toton (between Nottingham and Derby), and received at Brent sidings
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Herne Hill Railway Station
Herne Hill railway station is in the London Borough of Lambeth, South London, England, on the boundary between London fare zones 2 and 3. Train services are provided by Thameslink to London Blackfriars, Farringdon, St Pancras International and Luton Airport on the Thameslink route and by Southeastern to London Victoria (via Brixton) and Orpington on the Chatham Main Line. The station building on Railton Road was opened in 1862 by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway. Initial service was only to Victoria, but by 1869 services ran to the City of London, King's Cross, Kingston via Wimbledon, and Kent, including express trains to Dover Harbour for continental Europe
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LMS Stanier Class 8F
The London Midland and Scottish Railway's 8F class 2-8-0
2-8-0
heavy freight locomotive is a class of steam locomotive designed for hauling heavy freight
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Chertsey Railway Station
Chertsey railway station serves the town of Chertsey in the Runnymede District of Surrey, England. It is located on the Chertsey Branch of the Waterloo to Reading Line and is operated by South Western Railway. The station was opened, with the branch line, in 1848. It comprises Up and Down platforms having brick buildings: the main building being on the Down side. There is a level crossing here. The Station Hotel was constructed beside it in 1869. This was converted to an office building in 1990 but still retains a pub style sign at the front overhanging the footpath. Inside the station building was a café called the Buffet Carr which closed late 2009
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Windsor & Eton Riverside Railway Station
Windsor & Eton Riverside station is a station in Windsor in Berkshire, England. The station, close to the River Thames and Windsor Castle, is a Grade II listed building.[1] It is the terminus of the Staines to Windsor Line and is served by South Western Railway from London Waterloo, some 25 1⁄2 miles (41.0 km) to the east.[2] The station is also in close proximity to Windsor's other station, Windsor & Eton Central, which is served by Great Western Railway trains from Slough on the Windsor branch of the Great Western Main Line.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Windsor Link Railway 4 Incidents 5 Services 6 Gallery 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksDescription[edit] The station building was designed by William Tite as a royal station with a stone-faced frontage with a mullioned and transomed main window, gables and a multi-arch entrance.[3] The main booking hall was decorative but is now a wine bar
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London Waterloo
Waterloo station (/ˌwɔːtərˈluː/), also known as London Waterloo, is a central London terminus on the National Rail network in the United Kingdom, located in the Waterloo area of the London Borough of Lambeth. It is connected to a London Underground station of the same name and is adjacent to Waterloo East station on the South Eastern main line. The station is the terminus of the South Western main line to Weymouth via Southampton, the West of England main line to Exeter via Salisbury, the Portsmouth Direct line to Portsmouth Harbour and the Isle of Wight, and several commuter services around West and South West London, Surrey, Hampshire and Berkshire. Many services stop at Clapham Junction and Woking. The station was first opened in 1848 by the London and South Western Railway, and replaced the earlier Nine Elms as it was closer to the West End
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