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Barbara Leonard Reynolds
Barbara Leonard Reynolds
Barbara Leonard Reynolds
(Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 12, 1915 – February 11, 1990), was an American author who became a Quaker, peace activist and educator. In 1951, Reynolds moved with her husband to Hiroshima
Hiroshima
where he conducted a three-year study on the effects of radiation on children who had survived the first atomic bomb. She and her family then became peace activists, sailing around the world to protest nuclear weapons. In the early 1960s, she traveled around the world with atomic bomb survivors to show world leaders, first-hand, the horrors of nuclear warfare
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Milwaukee, Wisconsin
US: 31st WI: 1st • Density 6,191/sq mi (2,388.90/km2) • Urban 1,376,476 (US: 35th) • Metro 1,572,245 (US: 39th) • CSA 2,043,904 (US: 29th)Demonym(s) MilwaukeeanTime zone CST (UTC-6) • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)Zip codes 53172, 53201, 53202, 53203, 53204, 53205, 53206, 53207, 53208, 53209, 53210, 53211, 53212, 53213, 53214, 53215, 53216, 53218, 53219, 53220, 53221, 53222, 53223, 53224, 53225, 53226, 53227, 53228, 53233, 53234, 53237, 53259, 53263, 53267, 53268, 53274, 53278, 53288, 53290, 53293, 53295Area code(s) 414FIPS code 55-53000[4]GNIS feature ID 1577901[5]Major airport General Mitchell International A
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Cambodian People
Khmer people
Khmer people
(Khmer: ខ្មែរ, Khmer pronunciation: [kʰmaːe], Northern Khmer pronunciation: [kʰmɛr]) are a Southeast Asian ethnic group native to Cambodia, accounting for 97.6% of the country's 15.9 million people.[11] They speak the Khmer language, which is part of the larger Austroasiatic language family found in parts of central, eastern and north eastern India
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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John H. Sammis
John H. Sammis was the writer of the Christian hymn Trust and Obey with Towner in 1887.[1][2] Sammis was born in 1846, in Brooklyn, New York and died in 1919 in Los Angeles, California. A businessman who became a Presbyterian minister, John Sammis also wrote the hymn He's a Friend of Mine. He taught at the Bible Institute of Los Angeles. Sammis wrote over 100 hymns. Most of them can be categorized in "Songs of TRUST" and "Songs of OBEDIENCE". They were compiled by T. C. Horton (a founder of Bible Institute of Los Angeles) and R. A. Torrey in 1918.[3] References[edit]^ Trust and Obey, the Song and the Story ^ Hymn Story Trust and Obey ^ "Trust and obey," and other songs (1918)External links[edit]Works by or about John H. Sammis at Internet Archive Works by John H. Sammis at LibriVox (public domain audiobooks) This article about a United States songwriter is a stub
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University Of Michigan
The University of Michigan
Michigan
(UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The University of Michigan
Michigan
is the state's oldest university, founded in 1817 in Detroit, Michigan
Michigan
as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the Michigan
Michigan
Territory became a state. It moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet (780 acres; 3.2 km2) spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit
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Hiroshima Peace Park
Hiroshima
Hiroshima
(広島市, Hiroshima-shi, Japanese: [çiɾoɕima]) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture
Hiroshima Prefecture
and the largest city in the Chūgoku region
Chūgoku region
of western Honshu
Honshu
- the largest island of Japan. Hiroshima, a name meaning "Broad Island", gained city status on April 1, 1889. On April 1, 1980, Hiroshima
Hiroshima
became a designated city. As of August 2016[update], the city has an estimated population of 1,196,274
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Norman Cousins
Norman Cousins
Norman Cousins
(June 24, 1915 – November 30, 1990) was an American political journalist, author, professor, and world peace advocate.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Political views and activism 4 Illness and recovery 5 Movie portrayal 6 Death 7 See also 8 Selected works 9 Awards 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksEarly life[edit] Cousins was born in West Hoboken, New Jersey
West Hoboken, New Jersey
(which later became Union City). At age 11, he was misdiagnosed with tuberculosis and placed in a sanatorium. Despite this, he was an athletic youth,[1] and he claimed that as a young boy he “set out to discover exuberance.” Cousins attended Theodore Roosevelt High School in the Bronx, New York City, graduating on February 3, 1933
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Ho Chi Minh City
Ho Chi Minh
Ho Chi Minh
City (Vietnamese: Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh; [tʰàn fǒ hò tɕǐ mɨ̄n] ( listen) or [tʰàn fǒ hò cǐ mɨ̄n]), also informally known by its former name of Saigon (Vietnamese: Sài Gòn; [sàj ɣɔ̀ŋ] ( listen)), is the largest city in Vietnam
Vietnam
by population. It was known as Prey Nokor (Khmer: ព្រៃនគរ) prior to annexation by the Vietnamese in the 17th century. Under the name Saigon, it was the capital of the French colony of Cochinchina and later of the independent republic of South Vietnam
Vietnam
1955–75
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The Killing Fields
European colonization of the AmericasDzungar genocide, 1750s Manifest DestinyIndian Removal, 1830s California Genocide, 1848–1873Circassian genocide, 1860s Selk'nam genocide, 1890s–1900s Herero and Namaqua genocide, 1904–1907 Greek genocide, 1914–1923 Assyrian genocide, 1914–1925 Armenian Genocide, 1915–1923 Libyan Genocide, 1923–1932Soviet genocide Ethnic cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
in the Soviet UnionSoviet famine of 1932–33Holodomor, 1931–1933 Kazakhstan, 1930–1933Mass Deportations during World War IIKalmyks, 1943 Chechens and Ingush, 1
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Long Beach, California
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimIncorporated December 13, 1897[2]Government • Type Council-manager[3] • Mayor Robert Garcia[4] • City council[8] Jeannine Pearce Lena Gonzalez Daryl Supernaw Suzie Price Dee Andrews Stacy Mungo Al Austin Rex Richardson (Vice Mayor) Roberto Uranga • City manager Patrick H. West[5] • City auditor Laura L
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Quaker
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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Albert Schweitzer
Albert Schweitzer, OM (14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was a French-German theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. A Lutheran, Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at this time, as well as the traditional Christian view. His contributions to the interpretation of Pauline Christianity
Pauline Christianity
concern the role of Paul's mysticism of “being in Christ” as primary and the doctrine of Justification by Faith as secondary. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life”,[2] expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa (then French Equatorial Africa)
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Hibakusha
Hibakusha
Hibakusha
(被爆者) is the Japanese word for the surviving victims of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima
Hiroshima
and Nagasaki
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