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Bao'an County
Bao'an County
Bao'an County
(simplified Chinese: 宝安县; traditional Chinese: 寶安縣), formerly named Xin'an County was a historic county in South China. It includes the city of Shenzhen
Shenzhen
and Hong Kong. For most of its history, the administrative center of the county was in Nantou. During the time of the Three Kingdoms, the later Bao'an County, along with Dongguan
Dongguan
and Boluo counties, formed a single large district with the name Boluo (博羅).[1] In 331, the Eastern Jin
Eastern Jin
Dynasty established Bao'an County, one of six counties under Dōngguān (東官) Prefecture. This prefecture's area included modern Shenzhen
Shenzhen
and Dongguan.[2] In the second year of the Zhide of Suzong under the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
(757 AD), Dōngguān was renamed to Dōngguǎn (東莞).Map of Bao'an (Po'On) County in 1866
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County (China)
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level ci
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Cantonese
Cantonese, or Standard Cantonese, is a variety of the Chinese language spoken within Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(historically known as Canton) and its vicinity in southeastern China. It is the traditional prestige variety of Yue, one of the major subdivisions of Chinese. In mainland China, it is the lingua franca of the province of Guangdong, being the majority language of the Pearl River Delta, and neighbouring areas such as Guangxi. It is the dominant and official language of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
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Emperor Suzong Of Tang
Emperor Suzong of Tang
Emperor Suzong of Tang
(19 October 711[3] – 16 May 762;[5] r. 756 – 762), personal name Li Heng, né Li Sisheng (李嗣升), known as Li Jun (李浚) from 725 to 736, known as Li Yu (李璵) from 736 to 738, known briefly as Li Shao (李紹) in 738, was an emperor of the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
and the son of Emperor Xuanzong. Suzong ascended the throne after his father fled to Sichuan
Sichuan
during the An Lushan
An Lushan
Rebellion in 756; Li Heng himself had fled in the opposite direction, to Lingwu, where he was declared emperor by the army
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Eastern Jin
The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire
Empire
(/dʒɪn/;[2] Chinese: 晉朝; pinyin: Jìn Cháo, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin or Liang Jin) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from AD 265 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, son of Sima Zhao who was made Prince of Jin and posthumously declared the founder of the dynasty. It followed the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220-280 AD), which ended with the conquest of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
by the Jin. There are two main divisions in the history of the dynasty
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Boluo County
Boluo County
Boluo County
(Chinese: 博罗县; pinyin: Bóluó Xiàn) is a county of east-central Guangdong
Guangdong
province, People's Republic of China. It is under the administration of Huizhou
Huizhou
City, and in 2009, had a population of 813,700 residing in an area of 2,795 km2 (1,079 sq mi)
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Three Kingdoms
The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
(AD 184/220–280) was the tripartite division of China
China
between the states of Wei (魏), Shu (蜀), and Wu (吳).[1] It started with the dissolution of the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
and was followed by the Jin dynasty. The term "Three Kingdoms" is something of a misnomer, since each state was eventually headed not by a king, but by an emperor who claimed suzerainty over all China.[2] Nevertheless, the term "Three Kingdoms" has become standard among sinologists
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Northern And Southern China
Northern China and southern China[a] are two approximate regions within China. The exact boundary between these two regions are not precisely defined. Nevertheless, the self-perception of Chinese people, especially regional stereotypes, has often been dominated by these two concepts, given that regional differences in culture and language have historically fostered strong regional identities (simplified Chinese: 乡土; traditional Chinese: 鄉土; pinyin: xiāngtǔ; literally: "localism") of the Chinese people.[1]Contents1 Extent 2 History 3 Today 4 Stereotypes and differences 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Sources8 Further readingExtent[edit] Often used as the geographical dividing line between northern and southern China is the Huai River– Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
Line
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History Of The United Kingdom
The history of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
as a unified sovereign state can be treated as beginning in 1707 with the political union of the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland,[1] into a united kingdom called Great Britain.[note 1] Of this new state the historian Simon Schama
Simon Schama
said:What began as a hostile merger would end in a full partnership in the most powerful going concern in the world... it was one of the most astonishing transformations in European history.[2]The Act of Union 1800
Act of Union 1800
added the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland. The first decades were marked by Jacobite risings
Jacobite risings
which ended with defeat for the Stuart cause at Culloden in 1746
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History Of China
The earliest known written records of the history of China
China
date from as early as 1250 BC,[1][2] from the Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
(c. 1600–1046 BC).[3] Ancient historical texts such as the Records of the Grand Historian (c. 100 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period, and Shang
Shang
writings do not indicate the existence of the Xia.[3][4] The Shang
Shang
ruled in the Yellow River
Yellow River
valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic
Neolithic
civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze
Yangtze
River
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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Yale Romanization Of Cantonese
The Yale romanization of Cantonese
Cantonese
was developed by Gerard P. Kok for his and Parker Po-fei Huang's textbook Speak Cantonese
Cantonese
initially circulated in looseleaf form in 1952[1] but later published in 1958.[2] Unlike the Yale romanization of Mandarin, it is still widely used in books and dictionaries, especially for foreign learners of Cantonese. It shares some similarities with Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
in that unvoiced, unaspirated consonants are represented by letters traditionally used in English and most other European languages to represent voiced sounds. For example, [p] is represented as b in Yale, whereas its aspirated counterpart, [pʰ] is represented as p
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Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
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Hakka Chinese
79-AAA-g > 79-AAA-ga (+ 79-AAA-gb transition to 79-AAA-h)This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Chinese Postal Romanization
Postal romanization[1] was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office in the early 1900s. The system was in common use until the 1980s. For major cities and other places that already had widely accepted European names, traditional spellings were retained.[2] With regard to other place names, the post office revised policy several times. Spellings given could reflect the local pronunciation, Nanjing pronunciation, or Beijing pronunciation
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