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Bantam Books
Bantam Books
Bantam Books
is an American publishing house owned entirely by parent company Random House, a subsidiary of Penguin Random House; it is an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group. It was formed in 1945 by Walter B. Pitkin, Jr., Sidney B. Kramer, and Ian and Betty Ballantine. It has since been purchased several times by companies including National General, Carl Lindner's American Financial and, most recently, Bertelsmann; it became part of Random House in 1998, when Bertelsmann
Bertelsmann
purchased it to form Bantam Doubleday Dell.[1] It began as a mass market publisher, mostly of reprints of hardcover books, with some original paperbacks as well
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Laurell K. Hamilton
Laurell Kaye Hamilton (born February 19, 1963) is an American fantasy and romance writer.[2] She is best known as the author of two series of stories. Her New York Times-bestselling Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series centers on Anita Blake, a professional zombie raiser, vampire executioner and supernatural consultant for the police, which includes novels, short story collections, and comic books. Six million copies of Anita Blake
Anita Blake
novels are in print.[1] Her Merry Gentry series centers on Meredith Gentry, Princess of the Unseelie court of Faerie, a private detective facing repeated assassination attempts. Both of these fantasy series follow their protagonists as they gain in power and deal with the dangerous "realities" of worlds in which creatures of legend live. Hamilton is generally considered one of the most influential writers in the history of paranormal fiction
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Philip K. Dick
Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer known for his influential work in science fiction. His work explored philosophical, social, and political themes, with stories dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes, authoritarian governments, and altered states of consciousness. His writing also reflected his interest in metaphysics and theology, and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality, identity, drug abuse, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences. Born in Illinois, he eventually moved to California and began publishing science fiction stories in the 1950s
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Ernest Callenbach
Ernest Callenbach
Ernest Callenbach
(April 3, 1929 – April 16, 2012) was an American author, film critic, editor, and simple living adherent.[1] He became famous due to his internationally successful semi-utopian novel Ecotopia
Ecotopia
(1975).Contents1 Life & Work 2 Quotes 3 Bibliography 4 Further reading 5 External links 6 ReferencesLife & Work[edit] Born into a farming family in Williamsport, Pennsylvania,[2] Callenbach attended the University of Chicago, where he was drawn into the then 'new wave' of serious attention to film as an art form. After six months in Paris at the Sorbonne, watching four films a day, he returned to Chicago and earned a Master’s degree in English and Communications. Callenbach then moved to California. From 1955 to 1991, he was on the staff of the University of California Press
University of California Press
(Berkeley)
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Ray Bradbury
Ray Douglas Bradbury (August 22, 1920 – June 5, 2012) was an American author and screenwriter. He worked in a variety of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, horror, and mystery fiction. Widely known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953), and his science-fiction and horror-story collections, The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), and I Sing the Body Electric (1969), Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th- and 21st-century American writers. While most of his best known work is in speculative fiction, he also wrote in other genres, such as the coming-of-age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) and the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992). Recipient of numerous awards, including a 2007 Pulitzer Citation, Bradbury also wrote and consulted on screenplays and television scripts, including Moby Dick and It Came from Outer Space
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S. S. Van Dine
S. S. Van Dine (also styled S.S. Van Dine[1]) is the pseudonym used by American art critic Willard Huntington Wright (October 15, 1888 – April 11, 1939) when he wrote detective novels. Wright was an important figure in avant-garde cultural circles in pre-World War I New York, and under the pseudonym (which he originally used to conceal his identity) he created the immensely popular fictional detective Philo Vance, a sleuth and aesthete who first appeared in books in the 1920s, then in movies and on the radio.Contents1 Early life 2 Writing career 3 Detective fiction 4 Study of detective fiction 5 Short film series 6 Late career and death 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Willard Huntington Wright was born to Archibald Davenport Wright and Annie Van Vranken Wright on October 15, 1888, in Charlottesville, Virginia
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Jean Auel
Jean Marie Auel (/ˈdʒiːn məˈriː ˈaʊl/; née Untinen; born February 18, 1936) is a Finnish-American writer who wrote the Earth's Children books, a series of novels set in prehistoric Europe that explores human activities during this time, and touches on the interactions of Cro-Magnon people with Neanderthals. Her books have sold more than 45 million copies worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early years 2 Career as novelist 3 Bibliography 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly years[edit] Jean Marie Untinen was born in 1936 in Chicago.[3] She is of Finnish descent, the second of five children of Neil Solomon Untinen, a housepainter, and Martha (née Wirtanen) Untinen. Auel attended University of Portland.[1] While a student, she joined Mensa[4] and worked at Tektronix as a clerk (1965–1966), a circuit-board designer (1966–1973), a technical writer (1973–1974), and a credit manager (1974–1976)
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Stephen R. Donaldson
Stephen Reeder Donaldson (born May 13, 1947) is an American fantasy, science fiction and mystery novelist, most famous for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, his ten-novel fantasy series. His work is characterized by psychological complexity, conceptual abstractness, moral bleakness, and the use of an arcane vocabulary, and has attracted critical praise for its "imagination, vivid characterizations, and fast pace".[1] He earned his bachelor's degree from The College of Wooster and a Master's degree from Kent State University
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Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
(/ˈændʒəloʊ/ ( listen);[1][2] born Marguerite Annie Johnson; April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014) was an American poet, singer, memoirist, and civil rights activist. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years. She received dozens of awards and more than 50 honorary degrees.[3] Angelou is best known for her series of seven autobiographies, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences
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The Guinness Book Of Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 62nd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
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Short Story
A short story is a piece of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting. Emerging from earlier oral storytelling traditions in the 17th century, the short story has grown to encompass a body of work so diverse as to defy easy characterization. At its most prototypical the short story features a small cast of named characters, and focuses on a self-contained incident with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood.[1] In doing so, short stories make use of plot, resonance, and other dynamic components to a far greater degree than is typical of an anecdote, yet to a far lesser degree than a novel. While the short story is largely distinct from the novel, authors of both generally draw from a common pool of literary techniques. Short stories have no set length
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Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
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Frederick Forsyth
Frederick McCarthy Forsyth CBE (born 25 August 1938) is an English author, former journalist and spy, and occasional political commentator. He is best known for thrillers such as The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Fourth Protocol, The Dogs of War, The Devil's Alternative, The Fist of God, Icon, The Veteran, Avenger, The Afghan, The Cobra and The Kill List. Forsyth's works frequently appear on best-sellers lists and more than a dozen of his titles have been adapted to film
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Children's Literature
Children's literature
Children's literature
or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader. Children's literature
Children's literature
can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 15th century, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children
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Lisa Gardner
Lisa Gardner is an American author of fiction. She is the author of several thrillers including The Killing Hour and The Next Accident. She also wrote romance novels using the pseudonym Alicia Scott.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Personal life 3 Bibliography3.1 As Lisa Gardner3.1.1 FBI Profiler series (Quincy) 3.1.2 Detective D.D. Warren series 3.1.3 Standalone novels3.2 As Alicia Scott4 References 5 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Raised in Hillsboro, Oregon, she graduated from the city's Glencoe High School.[1] Her novel Gone is set in a fictionalized version of Tillamook, Oregon.[1] In the mid-1990s, she was a research analyst in Boston with Mercer Management (now Oliver Wyman)
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Coronet (magazine)
Coronet was a general interest digest magazine published from October 23, 1936, to at least March 1971[1] and ran for 299 issues. Coronet magazine continued publication under some form and ownership through at least September 1976, an issue with actress Angie Dickinson on the cover. The magazine was owned by Esquire and published by David A. Smart from 1936 to 1961.[2]Contents1 Typical issue 2 Coronet Films 3 Editors 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTypical issue[edit] Each issue had a wide variety of articles and features, as well as a condensed book section. Poetry was featured, along with gift advice and star stories. The sister company Coronet Films was promoted in most issues as well. Articles on culture and the arts were mixed with adventure stories and social advice. Coronet Films[edit] Main article: Coronet Films Coronet Films were also produced by David Smart and the Esquire company
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