HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Banisteriopsis Caapi
Banisteriopsis
Banisteriopsis
caapi, also known as ayahuasca, caapi or yagé, is a South American liana of the family Malpighiaceae. It is used to prepare ayahuasca, a decoction with a long history of its entheogenic use and its status as a "plant teacher" among the indigenous peoples of the Amazon rainforest. It contains the harmala alkaloids harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine. These alkaloids of the beta-carboline class act as monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOIs). The MAOIs allow the primary psychoactive compound, DMT, which is introduced from the other main ingredient in ayahausca Psychotria viridis, to be orally active
[...More...]

"Banisteriopsis Caapi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agricultural Research Service
The Agricultural Research Service
Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) is the principal in-house research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA). ARS is one of four agencies in USDA's Research, Education and Economics mission area. ARS is charged with extending the nation's scientific knowledge and solving agricultural problems through its four national program areas: nutrition, food safety and quality; animal production and protection; natural resources and sustainable agricultural systems; and crop production and protection. ARS research focuses on solving problems affecting Americans every day. ARS has more than 2,200 permanent scientists working on approximately 1,100 research projects at more than 100 locations across the country, with a few locations in other countries
[...More...]

"Agricultural Research Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Banister (naturalist)
John Baptist Banister (1654 – May 1692) was an English clergyman and one of the first university-trained naturalists in North America. His primary focus was botany but he also studied insects and molluscs. He was sent out as a missionary chaplain by the garden-loving Bishop Henry Compton,[1] with whom he soon established a correspondence. Banister was first in Barbados in the West Indies and then by April 1679[2] in Virginia, where, while serving a rector of the parish of Charles City he became one of Bishop Compton's most energetic plant collectors, "the first Virginia botanist of any note".[3] Banister matriculated at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he could see and study the American plants grown from seed in the Oxford Physic Garden under the care of Dr
[...More...]

"John Banister (naturalist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gonzales V. O Centro Espirita Beneficente Uniao Do Vegetal
Gonzales v. O Centro Espirita Beneficente Uniao do Vegetal, 546 U.S. 418 (2006), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that, under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the government had failed to show a compelling interest in prosecuting religious adherents for drinking a sacramental tea containing a Schedule I controlled substance. After the federal government seized its sacramental tea, the União do Vegetal (UDV), the New Mexican branch of a Brazilian church that imbibes ayahuasca in its services, sued, claiming the seizure was illegal, and sought to ensure future importation of the tea for religious use. The church won a preliminary injunction from the United States District Court for the District of New Mexico, which was affirmed on appeal. The Supreme Court affirmed
[...More...]

"Gonzales V. O Centro Espirita Beneficente Uniao Do Vegetal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Controlled Drugs And Substances Act
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
[...More...]
"Controlled Drugs And Substances Act" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Patent
A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state or intergovernmental organization to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property. The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness
[...More...]

"Patent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

University Of Michigan Herbarium
The University of Michigan Herbarium is the herbarium of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the United States. One of the most-extensive botanical collections in the world, the herbarium has some 1.7 million specimens of vascular plants, algae, bryophytes, fungi, and lichens, and is a valuable resource for teaching and research in biology and botany.[1] The herbarium includes many rare and extinct species.[1]Contents1 Administration 2 History 3 Collections 4 Notes 5 External linksAdministration[edit] Formerly an independent unit of the University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA), the herbarium is now part of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology within LSA.[2] The herbarium is located at 3600 Varsity Drive in Ann Arbor.[3] The Herbarium funds one Graduate Museum Assistant annually.[4] It also has since 1977 awarded the annual Kenneth L
[...More...]

"University Of Michigan Herbarium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Patent Office
The United States
United States
Patent
Patent
and Trademark
Trademark
Office (USPTO) is an agency in the U.S. Department of Commerce that issues patents to inventors and businesses for their inventions, and trademark registration for product and intellectual property identification. The USPTO
USPTO
is "unique among federal agencies because it operates solely on fees collected by its users, and not on taxpayer dollars".[2] Its "operating structure is like a business in that it receives requests for services—applications for patents and trademark registrations—and charges fees projected to cover the cost of performing the services [it] provide[s]".[2][3] The USPTO
USPTO
is based in Alexandria, Virginia, after a 2005 move from the Crystal City area of neighboring Arlington, Virginia
[...More...]

"United States Patent Office" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Plant Teacher
Plant Teacher is a 2011 novel by Ellen Alderton writing as Caroline Alethia.[1] It has been recognized by various indie awards including finalist in the International Book Awards,[2] runner up in the Green Book Festival,[3] honorable mention in the Hollywood Book Festival,[4] honorable mention in the Paris Book Festival,[5] and honorable mention in the Halloween Book Festival.[6] It was a winner of the best travel/essay fiction category in the 2012 Global Ebook Awards.[7] The novel, portraying a group of American expatriates in Bolivia living against the backdrop of an Evo Morales administration aggrandizing power, has been described as "powerful" and a "must-read" by Huffington Post contributor Joel Hirst
[...More...]

"Plant Teacher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Germplasm Resources Information Network
Germplasm
Germplasm
Resources Information Network or GRIN is an online USDA National Genetic Resources Program software project to comprehensively manage the computer database for the holdings of all plant germplasm collected by the National Plant Germplasm
Germplasm
System.[1] GRIN has extended its role to manage information on the germplasm reposits of insect (invertebrate), microbial, and animal species (see Sub-Projects).[2]Contents1 Description 2 Sub-projects 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The site is a resource for identifying taxonomic information (scientific names) as well as common names[3] on more than 500,000 accessions (distinct varieties, cultivars etc.) of plants covering 10,000 species;[4][5] both economically important ones[3] and wild species
[...More...]

"Germplasm Resources Information Network" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Department Of Agriculture
The United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. Approximately 80% of the USDA's $141 billion budget goes to the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) program
[...More...]

"United States Department Of Agriculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
[...More...]

"Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
[...More...]

"PubMed Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paywall
A paywall is a method of restricting access to Internet content via a paid subscription.[1][2] Beginning in the mid-2010s, newspapers started implementing paywalls on their websites as a way to increase revenue after years of decline in paid print readership and advertising revenue.[3] In academics, research papers are often subject to a paywall and are available via academic libraries that subscribe.[4][5] Paywalls have also been used as a way of increasing the number of print subscribers; for example, some newspapers offer access to online content plus delivery of a Sunday print edition at a lower price than online access alone.[6] Newspaper websites such as that of The Boston Globe and The New York Times
[...More...]

"Paywall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.