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Banganga Temple Shikhara
Banganga or Banganga Tank
Banganga Tank
is an ancient[1] water tank which is part of the Walkeshwar Temple
Walkeshwar Temple
Complex in
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Banganga (other)
Banganga might refer to the following:Contents1 Villages 2 Water tanks 3 Waterfalls 4 RiversVillages[edit]Banganga, NepalWater tanks[edit]Banganga Tank, an ancient water tank at Walkeshwar Temple Complex in Malabar Hill area of Mumbai CityWaterfalls[edit]Banganga (waterfall), a waterfall, at Trilokpur, 17 km (11 mi) from Nahan in PunjabRivers[edit]Banganga River (Rajasthan), a river in Rajasthan, near Keoladeo National Park, also known for the annual Banganga Fair Banganga River (Maharashtra), a river in Maharashtra, that flows through the Nashik district Banganga River (Vaishno), a small rivulet, at the foothills of shrine Vaishno Devi Banganga River (Bihar), a river in Bihar, that flows near Rajgir Banganga River (Himachal Pradesh), a river in Himachal Pradesh, that flows near KangraThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Banganga. If an internal link led you here, you may
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Powai Lake
Powai
Powai
Lake
Lake
is an artificial lake, situated in Mumbai, in the Powai valley, where a Powai
Powai
village with a cluster of huts existed. The city suburb called Powai
Powai
shares its name with the lake. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, one of the premier institutions of science and technology in India, is located to the east of the lake.[1] Another famous institution, the National Institute of Industrial Engineering (NITIE), is also located close to the lake. Housing complexes and plush hotels are developed all around the lake periphery
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Worli Fort
The Worli
Worli
Fort is a fort built by the British in Worli, Mumbai, India.[1] The fort, often mistakenly referred to as being built by the Portuguese, was built by the British around 1675. The fort, built on the Worli
Worli
hill, overlooked the Mahim Bay
Mahim Bay
at a time the city was made up of just seven islands. It was used as a lookout for enemy ships and pirates. See also[edit]List of forts in MaharashtraReferences[edit]^ Murray, John (1859). A handbook for India. Part ii. Bombay. Original from Oxford University
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Girangaon
Girangaon
Girangaon
(literally "mill village") was a name commonly used to refer to an area now part of central Mumbai, India, which at one time had almost 130 textile mills, with the majority being cotton mills. The mills of Girangaon
Girangaon
contributed significantly to the prosperity and growth of Mumbai
Mumbai
during the later nineteenth century and for the transformation of Mumbai
Mumbai
into a major industrial metropolis.[1] Girangaon
Girangaon
covered an area of 600 acres (2.4 km2), not including the workers' housing. The mill workers lived in a community, and they fostered a unique culture which shaped Mumbai
Mumbai
at the turn of the twentieth century
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Samyukta Maharashtra Movement
Samyukta Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Movement (or Sanyukta Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Andolan) was an organisation that, starting in 1956, demanded the creation of a separate Marathi-speaking state out of the (then-bilingual) State of Bombay in western India, with the city of Bombay as its capital.[1] Similarly, in 1956 the Mahagujarat Movement
Mahagujarat Movement
started agitation for creation of separate Gujarati-speaking State out of Bombay State, which became the state of Gujarat. The Samyukta Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Movement achieved its aim when the present state of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
was created on 1 May 1960. The state reorganization left Marathi-speaking areas in Northern Karnataka, such as Belgaon, outside Maharashtra
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Tanks Of Bombay
Although the tanks have long vanished, the city of Bombay
Bombay
(now Mumbai) once had many water tanks within its city limits. They were once the only source of water to the city. The only testimony to their existence is the names of the roads in their vicinity, which befuddles many citizens as to the original location to these mystifying relics of the past. The oldest tank was the Cowasjee Patel Tank built in 1775. A total of ten tanks were built between the eighteenth and nineteenth century. The tanks were named after philanthropic citizens who donated money to fund the building of these tanks so that the citizens of the city would get a fresh source of drinking water
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Growth Of Mumbai
The following is a timeline of the growth of Mumbai's population over the last four centuries:1661: 10,000 inhabitants[1] 1664: 15,000[1] 1673: 60,000[1] (Fryer) 1675: 60,000 1718: 16,000[1] (Cobbe) 1744: 70,000[1] (Niebuhr) (large influx of people during the busy season) 1764: 140,000[1] (Niebuhr), According to Historical account pg 6, pop was 60,000 1780: 100,000[1] Materials etc. Part III, pg 525 -- Mahim 13,726 1812: 235,000[1] (Hall) Fixed 165,000, migratory 50,000, famine increase 20,000 1814: 180,000 (Warden) 1830: 229,000[1] Lagrange 1836: 236,000 "-do- 1864: 816,562 1872: 644,605[1] (census) 1881: 773,196[1] (census) 1891: 821,764[1] (census) 1901: 812,912 (Greater Bombay) 1911: 1,018,388 1921: 1,244,934 1931: 1,268,936 1941: 1,686,127 1951: 2,966,902 (0.1% of the world population) 1961: 4,152,056 1971: 5,970,575 1981: 8,227,382 1991: 9,900,000 + 2,600,000 (Thané) = 12,500,000 (Greater Bombay) 2001: 16,368,084 (Greater Mumbai, incl
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Bombay Riots
The Bombay Riots usually refers to the riots in Mumbai, in December 1992 and January 1993, in which around 900 people died.[1][2] The riots were mainly due to escalations of hostilities after large scale protests (which were initially peaceful, but eventually turned violent) by Muslims in reaction to the 1992 Babri Masjid Demolition by Hindu
Hindu
Karsevaks in Ayodhya.[3] An investigative commission was formed under Justice B.N
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1993 Bombay Bombings
The 1993 Bombay
Bombay
bombings were a series of 12 bomb explosions that took place in Mumbai, India, then known as Bombay, on 12 March 1993.[3] The coordinated attacks, carried out in revenge for earlier riots that killed many people,[4] were the most-destructive bomb explosions in Indian history.[5] These were the first serial-bomb-blasts of their kind in the world
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2008 Mumbai Attacks
The 2008 Mumbai
Mumbai
attacks (also referred to as 26/11)[10][a] were a group of terrorist attacks that took place in November 2008, when 10 members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, an Islamic terrorist organisation based in Pakistan, carried out a series of 12 coordinated shooting and bombing attacks lasting four days across Mumbai.[11][12][13] The attacks, which drew widespread global condemnation, began on Wednesday, 26 November and lasted until Saturday, 29 November 2008. 164 people died and 308 were wounded.[2][14] Eight of the attacks occurred in South Mumbai: at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, the Oberoi Trident,[15] the Taj Palace & Tower,[15] Leopold Cafe, Cama Hospital,[15] the Nariman House Jewish community centre,[16] the Metro Cinema,[17] and in a lane behind the Times of India building and St
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Terrorism In Mumbai
Terrorism
Terrorism
in India, according to the Home Ministry, poses a significant threat to the people of India. Terrorism
Terrorism
found in India includes ethno-nationalist terrorism, religious terrorism, left wing terrorism and narco terrorism.[5][6][7] A common definition of terrorism is the systematic use or threatened use of violence to intimidate a population or government for political, religious, or ideological goals.[8][9] The regions with long term terrorist activities have been Jammu and Kashmir, east-central and south-central India
India
(Naxalism) and the Seven Sister States
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Geography Of Mumbai
Mumbai
Mumbai
is India's most populous city. It is located on Salsette
Salsette
Island off the coast of Maharashtra. Originally seven islands, they were merged in the 18th century to form one large island.Contents1 Hills 2 Lakes 3 Bays 4 Creeks 5 Islands 6 Rivers 7 ReferencesHills[edit] The original seven islands of Bombay consisted of 22 hills. Most of them were razed to fill in the shallows to connect the islands. The hills still standing today are: Malabar Hill
Malabar Hill
— the highest point in the city area Cumbala Hill Antop Hill Sewri Hill Gilbert Hill Worli Hill Pali Hill Mazgaon Hill Sion Hill Mahakali Hill Golanji Hill Pulshachi Dongri Salamati HillThere are three hill ranges with the city limits. The Ghatkopar
Ghatkopar
Hills are present near the station of Ghatkopar
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Vihar Lake
Vihar Lake
Vihar Lake
is located near Vihar village on the Mithi River
Mithi River
within the precincts of the Borivali National Park, also called the Sanjay Gandhi National Park, in North Mumbai. When built in 1860 (construction started in 1856), it was considered as the largest lake in Mumbai
Mumbai
in the Salsette
Salsette
group of islands. It is hemmed between the Tulsi Lake
Tulsi Lake
and the Powai Lake(shown in map)
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Elephanta Caves
Elephanta Caves
Elephanta Caves
are a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
and a collection of cave temples predominantly dedicated to the Hindu
Hindu
god Shiva.[1][2][3] They are located on Elephanta Island, or Gharapuri (literally "the city of caves") in Mumbai
Mumbai
Harbour, 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) to the east of the city of Mumbai
Mumbai
in the Indian state of Mahārāshtra. The island, located offshore about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) west of the Jawaharlal Nehru Port, consists of Shaivite caves and a few Buddhist stupa mounds.[2][4] The Elephanta Caves
Elephanta Caves
contain rock cut stone sculptures that show syncretism of Hindu
Hindu
and Buddhist ideas and iconography.[4][5][6] The caves are hewn from solid basalt rock
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Tulsi Lake
Tulsi Lake
Tulsi Lake
is a fresh water lake in northern Mumbai
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