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Bana Kingdom
The Banas were a dynasty of South India, who claimed descent from the asura Mahabali. The dynasty takes its name from Bana, the son of Mahabali. The Banas faced opposition from several neighbouring dynasties and served some major dynasties such as the Cholas and Pandyas as feudatories, sometimes after they were subjugated by them. They also served as Samantas to some dynasties such as Chalukyas
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Mahabali
Mahabali
Mahabali
(IAST: Mahābalī), or Great Bali, also known as Māveli, was a benevolent kshatriya varna King in ancient Hindu antiquity. Mahabali was the great grandson of Hiranyakshipu, the grand son of Prahlada
Prahlada
and son of Virochana. After he failed to fulfill his promise to provide three paces of land for Vamana,[3] Vamana
Vamana
sends Mahabali
Mahabali
to live in netherworld for some period.[4] Pleased by Mahabali's devotion, Vamana also blesses Bali to be the Indra
Indra
during the period of the Manu known as Sāvarṇi.[5] Mahabali
Mahabali
was a beloved king and very kind to his subjects in the state of Kerala. The time under his rule was considered one of great prosperity and happiness. It is in fact this success as a king that led the gods to be wary of him and bring his demise at the hands of Vamana
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Ikshvaku Dynasty
The Ikshvaku
Ikshvaku
dynasty, in Puranic literature, was a dynasty[1] founded by the legendary king Ikshvaku. Ikshvaku, literally means "bitter cucumber [Citrullus colocynthis - Bot.]"[2]. The dynasty is also known as Sūryavaṁśa (the Solar dynasty). Lord Rama
Lord Rama
belonged to the Ikshavaku dynasty.[3] Twenty-two out of the twenty-four Jain Tirthankara
Tirthankara
belonged to this dynasty.[4] Rishabha
Rishabha
is present in both Hindu
Hindu
as well as Jain
Jain
mythology. Both refers to the same person. According to the Buddhist
Buddhist
texts, Prince Siddhartha
Prince Siddhartha
belonged to this dynasty. The important personalities belonging to this royal house are Bharata, Harishchandra, Dilīpa, Sagara,[5] Raghu, Rama
Rama
and Pasenadi
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Epigraphia Indica
Epigraphia Indica was the official publication of Archaeological Survey of India from 1882 to 1977. The first volume was edited by James Burgess in the year 1882. Between 1892 and 1920 it was published as a quarterly supplement to The Indian Antiquary.[1] One part is brought out in each quarter year and eight parts make one volume of this periodical; so that one volume is released once in two years. About 43 volumes of this journal have been published so far. They have been edited by the officers who headed the Epigraphy Branch of ASI.Contents1 Editors 2 Other contributors 3 Arabic and Persian Supplement 4 References 5 External linksEditors[edit]J. Burgess (Vol I (1882) & Vol II (1894)) E
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Perumpāṇāṟṟuppaṭai
Perumpanatruppadai (Tamil: பெரும்பாணாற்றுப்படை) is a Tamil poetic work in the Pathinenmaelkanakku anthology of Tamil literature, belonging to the Sangam period
Sangam period
corresponding to between 100 BCE – 100 CE. Perumpanarruppatai contains 500 lines of poetry in the Achiriyappa meter. The poems were written by the poet Kadiyalur Uruttirangannanar in praise of king Tondaiman Ilandiraiyan. Perumpanarruppatai belongs to the Pattupattu collection and follows the Arruppadtai style, a device used by most of the books in the Pattupattu collection. The work mentions how a brother of an ancient Chola king met with a Naga princess and had by him a son. The son was affectionately called Ilam Tiraiyan or literally the Young Tiraiyan by the family . Tiraiyar was the name of the naga tribe to which his mother belonged
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Historical Fiction
Historical fiction is a literary genre in which the plot takes place in a setting located in the past. Historical fiction can be an umbrella term; though commonly used as a synonym for describing the historical novel; the term can be applied to works in other narrative formats, such as those in the performing and visual arts like theatre, opera, cinema and television, as well as video games and graphic novels. An essential element of historical fiction is that it is set in the past and pays attention to the manners, social conditions and other details of the period depicted.[1] Authors also frequently choose to explore notable historical figures in these settings, allowing readers to better understand how these individuals might have responded to their environments
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Kalki
Kalki
Kalki
(Devanagari: कल्कि; lit. destroyer of filth) is the nemesis of demon Kali
Kali
and the tenth avatar of Vishnu
Vishnu
in Hinduism, foretold to appear at the end of Kali
Kali
Yuga, the present epoch. The Purana scriptures foretell that Kalki
Kalki
will be atop a white horse with a drawn blazing sword. He is the harbinger of the end time in Hindu eschatology, after which he will usher in Satya Yuga. In the Tibetan Buddhism
Tibetan Buddhism
Kalachakra
Kalachakra
tradition, 25 rulers of the Shambhala
Shambhala
Kingdom held the title of Kalki, Kulika
Kulika
or Kalki-king.[18] During Vaishakha, the first fortnight in Shukla Paksha is dedicated to fifteen deities, with each day for a different god
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Sangam Period
Maritime contacts Sangam period Tamilakam Cheras Ays Ezhil Malai Confluence of religions Venad
Venad
- Kingdom of Quilon Calicut Kolattunadu Cochin Minor principalities Portuguese period Dutch period Rise of Travancore Mysorean interlude British Period Battle of Quilon Communism in Kerala Unification of KeralaOther topics Geography Economy Architecture Fortsv t eSee also: First Sangam, Second Sangam, and Third Sangam Sangam period
Sangam period
(Tamil: சங்ககாலம், Sangakālam , Malayalam: സംഘകാലം ?) is the period of history of ancient Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
and Kerala
Kerala
(known as Tamilakam) spanning from c. 3rd century BC to c. 3rd century AD
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Kakatiya
The Kakatiya dynasty
Kakatiya dynasty
was a South Indian dynasty whose capital was Orugallu, now known as Warangal
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Kammanadu
Kammanadu (or Kamma-nadu, also Kamma-rashtra) is a region in the Indian state
Indian state
of Andhra Pradesh. The region is spread over the mandals of Bapatla, Narasaraopet
Narasaraopet
and Vinukonda
Vinukonda
mandals in Guntur district
Guntur district
and also covers Ongole
Ongole
and Chirala in Prakasam district.[1][2] The more specific borders of the region lies between Gundlakamma and Perakamma rivers or can also be described as the region lying between Konidena to Kammametu.[3][4] The people that emigrated from Kammanadu were referred to as belonging to a kammakula (kamma family)
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Chola
List of Chola
Chola
kings and emperorsEarly CholasEllalan Kulakkottan Ilamchetchenni Karikala Nedunkilli Nalankilli Killivalavan Kopperuncholan Kochchenganan PerunarkilliInterregnum (c. 200 – c. 848)Medieval CholasVijayalaya 848–891(?)Aditya I 891–907Parantaka I 907–950Gandaraditya 950–957Arinjaya 956–957Sundara (Parantaka II) 957–970Aditya II (co-regent)Uttama 970–985Rajaraja I 985–1014Rajendra I 1012–1044Rajadhiraja 1044–1054Rajendra II 1054–1063Virar
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Parantaka I
Parantaka Chola
Chola
I (Tamil: முதலாம் பராந்தக சோழன்) (907–955) ruled the Chola kingdom
Chola kingdom
in southern India for forty-eight years, annexing Pandya.[1] The best part of his reign was marked by increasing success and prosperity.Contents1 The Invasion of the Pandya
Pandya
Kingdom 2 Extent of Parantaka's Influence 3 Civic and Religious Contributions 4 Personal life 5 Inscriptions 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesThe Invasion of the Pandya
Pandya
Kingdom[edit] Parantaka continuing the expansion started by his father, invaded the Pandya
Pandya
kingdom in 910. He captured the Pandyan capital Madurai
Madurai
and assumed the title Madurain-konda (Capturer of Madurai). The Pandyan ruler Maravarman Rajasinha II sought the help of Kassapa V, the king of Sri Lanka, who sent an army to his aid
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Godavari
The Godavari
Godavari
is India's second longest river after the Ganga
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Pallava
The Pallava dynasty
Pallava dynasty
was a South Indian dynasty that existed from 275 CE to 897 CE, ruling a portion of what is today southern India. They gained prominence after the eclipse of the Satavahana dynasty, whom the Pallavas served as feudatories.[2][3] Pallavas became a major power during the reign of Mahendravarman I (571 – 630 CE) and Narasimhavarman I
Narasimhavarman I
(630 – 668 CE) and dominated the Telugu and northern parts of the Tamil region for about 600 years until the end of the 9th century
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