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Bamber Bridge
Bamber Bridge
Bamber Bridge
is a large suburban village in Lancashire, England, 3 miles (5 km) south-east of the city of Preston, in the borough of South Ribble. The name derives from the Old English
Old English
"bēam" and "brycg", which probably means "tree-trunk bridge". It is mentioned in an undated medieval document.[2] Bamber Bridge
Bamber Bridge
is often referred to as "the Brig" by residents. People born in Bamber Bridge
Bamber Bridge
are known as "Briggers"
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African American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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George Woodcock
George Woodcock (/ˈwʊdˌkɑːk/; May 8, 1912 – January 28, 1995) was a Canadian writer of political biography and history, an anarchist thinker, an essayist and literary critic. He was also a poet and published several volumes of travel writing.[1] In 1959 he was the founding editor of the journal Canadian Literature which was the first academic journal specifically dedicated to Canadian writing.[2] He is most commonly known outside Canada for his book Anarchism: A History of Libertarian Ideas and Movements (1962).Contents1 Life 2 Orwell 3 Recognition 4 Selected bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] Woodcock was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, but moved with his parents to England at an early age, attending Sir William Borlase's Grammar School in Marlow and Morley College
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Calico (textile)
Calico
Calico
(in British usage since 1505[1]) is a plain-woven textile made from unbleached and often not fully processed cotton. It may contain unseparated husk parts, for example. The fabric is far less fine than muslin, but less coarse and thick than canvas or denim, but it is still very cheap owing to its unfinished and undyed appearance. The fabric was originally from the city of Calicut
Calicut
in southwestern India. It was made by the traditional weavers called cāliyans
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Southern England
Southern England, or the South of England, also known as the South, refers roughly to the southern counties of England. The extent of this area can take a number of different interpretations depending on the context, including geographical, cultural, political and economic. Geographically, the extent of the south of England
England
may vary from the southern quarter (below the M4/Northern M25), via one-third of the country (excluding central England), to the southern half, bordering northern England. The South is often considered a principal cultural area of England, along with the Midlands and Northern England
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Northern England
Northern England, also known simply as the North, is the northern part of England, considered as a single cultural area. It extends from the Scottish border in the north to near the River Trent
River Trent
in the south, although precise definitions of its southern extent vary. Northern England
England
approximately comprises three statistical regions: the North East, North West and Yorkshire
Yorkshire
and the Humber. These have a combined population of around 14.9 million as of the 2011 Census and an area of 37,331 km2 (14,414 sq mi)
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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Confederate States Of America
The Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
(CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states – South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas
Texas
– in the Lower South
Lower South
region of the United States, whose regional economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.[2] Each state declared its secession from the United States
United States
following the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories
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House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
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Weaver (occupation)
Weaving
Weaving
is a method of textile production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right angles to form a fabric or cloth. Other methods are knitting, crocheting, felting, and braiding or plaiting. The longitudinal threads are called the warp and the lateral threads are the weft or filling. ( Weft
Weft
or is an old English word meaning "that which is woven".[a]) The method in which these threads are inter-woven affects the characteristics of the cloth.[1] Cloth
Cloth
is usually woven on a loom, a device that holds the warp threads in place while filling threads are woven through them. A fabric band which meets this definition of cloth (warp threads with a weft thread winding between) can also be made using other methods, including tablet weaving, back-strap, or other techniques without looms.[2] The way the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is called the weave
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
(TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
(MTB).[1] Tuberculosis
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Trades Union Congress
The Trades Union Congress
Trades Union Congress
(TUC) is a national trade union centre, a federation of trade unions in England
England
and Wales, representing the majority of trade unions. There are fifty affiliated unions, with a total of about 5.6 million members.[1] The current General Secretary is Frances O'Grady.[2] The TUC’s mission is to support trade unions to grow and thrive, and to stand up for everyone who works for a living. They campaign for more and better jobs, and a more equal, more prosperous country.[1]Contents1 Organisation 2 Campaigns2.1 Key achievements3 History3.1 19th century 3.2 20th century4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksOrganisation[edit] See also: List of affiliates of the Trades Union Congress The TUC's decision-making body is the Annual Congress, which takes place in September. Between congresses decisions are made by the General Council, which meets every two months
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