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Balti People
The Balti are an ethnic group of Tibetan descent with Dardic admixture who live in the Gilgit–Baltistan
Gilgit–Baltistan
region of Pakistan
Pakistan
and the Kargil region of India. Smaller populations are found in the Leh region; others are scattered in Pakistan's major urban centres of Lahore, Karachi
Karachi
and Islamabad/Rawalpindi.Contents1 Language 2 Religion 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingLanguage[edit] The Balti language
Balti language
belongs to the Tibetic language
Tibetic language
family. Read (1934) considers it a dialect of Ladakhi,[2] while Tournadre (2005) considers it a sister language of Ladakhi.[3] Religion[edit] The Baltis historically practiced Bön
Bön
and Tibetan Buddhism
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Balts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Baloch People
The Baloch or Baluch (Balochi: بلوچ‬) are a people who live mainly in the Balochistan
Balochistan
region of the southeastern-most edge of the Iranian plateau
Iranian plateau
in Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan, as well as in the Arabian Peninsula. They mainly speak the Balochi language, a branch of Northwestern Iranian languages, and are an Iranic people. About 50% of the total Baloch population live in Balochistan, a western province of Pakistan;[8] 40% of Baloch are settled in Sindh; and a significant number of Baloch people
Baloch people
in Punjab of Pakistan. They make up nearly 3.6% of the Pakistani population, about 2% of Iran's population (1.5 million) and about 2% of Afghanistan's population.[9] Baloch people
Baloch people
co-inhabit desert and mountainous regions along with Pashtuns
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Shi'a Islam
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commanding what is just Forbidding what is evil Tawalla Tabarra


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Noorbakshia Islam
Noorbakhshia Islam, also called Sufia Noorbakhshia[1], is one of the Sufi sects of Islam.[2][3] Its direct spiritual lineage and chain (silsila) is traced back to the Islamic prophet Muhammad, through Ali, Muhammad's cousin, son-in-law and the First Imam, by Imam Ali Al-Ridha
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Kharmang District
The Kharmang Valley (Urdu: وادی کھرمنگ) is one of the five biggest valleys of Baltistan; recently it became a district, whose headquarters is Temperorily at Tolti .[1] The valley is located about 100 km from the capital city of Baltistan SkarduKharmang DistrictDistrict[1]Coordinates: 34°56′40″N 76°13′21″E / 34.94444°N 76.22250°E / 34.94444; 76.22250Country PakistanProvince Gilgit-BaltistanHeadquarters KharmangArea • Total 7,909 km2 (3,054 sq mi)Population • Estimate (1998) 188,000Time zone PST (UTC+5)Kharmang District is a political sub-division of Pakistan. It is part of Baltistan and currently constitutes one of the ten districts of the Gilgit–Baltistan territory of Pakistan. It is bounded on the south by Kargil district of the Jammu and Kashmir, on the northeast by Ghanche District of GB, on the north by Skardu District of GB and on the west by Astore District of GB
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Tibetan Muslims
The Tibetan Muslims, also known as the Kachee (Tibetan: ཁ་ཆེ་, Wylie: kha-che; also spelled Kache), form a small minority in Tibet. Despite being Muslim, they are officially recognized as Tibetans by the government of the People's Republic of China, unlike the Hui Muslims, who are separately recognized. The Tibetan word Kachee literally means Kashmiri and Kashmir
Kashmir
was known as Kachee Yul (Yul means Country).Contents1 Ancestry 2 History 3 Converts in Qinghai 4 Balti people 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 References 8 External linksAncestry[edit] Generally speaking, the Tibetan Muslims
Tibetan Muslims
are unique in the fact that they are largely of Kashmiri descent through the patrilineal lineage and also often descendants of native Tibetans through the matrilineal lineage, although the reverse is not uncommon
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Three Cups Of Tea
Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time (original hardcover title: Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism and Build Nations ... One School at a Time) is a book by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin published by Penguin in 2007
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SART
Sart
Sart
was a name for the settled inhabitants of Central Asia
Central Asia
including Afghanistan, which has had shifting meanings over the centuries. Nowadays, this term refers to Uzbeks. Prior to 1920s, Sarts were referred to a group of people that spoke present day's Uzbek language. It changed when people from Russian Imperial Census made their first record of demographics of Russian Empire
Russian Empire
after Russian conquest of Central Asia. In their census, Sarts identified themselves as Sart, and after establishment of Soviet Union, Soviet linguists identified that Sarts and Uzbeks
Uzbeks
were speaking the same language with slight dialectal differences, and concluded removing Sart
Sart
identity and replacing it with Uzbek identity
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Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit- Baltistan
Baltistan
(Urdu: گلگت بلتستان‬‎), formerly known as the Northern Areas,[10] is the northernmost administrative territory in Pakistan.[1] It borders Azad Kashmir
Azad Kashmir
to the south, the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
to the west, the Wakhan Corridor
Wakhan Corridor
of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
to the north, the Xinjiang
Xinjiang
region of China, to the east and northeast, and the Indian-administered state of Jammu
Jammu
and Kashmir to the southeast
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Ethnic Groups In Pakistan
The major ethnic groups of Pakistan
Pakistan
in numerical size include: Punjabis, Pashtuns, Sindhis, Siddis, Saraikis, Muhajirs, Baloch, Hindkowans, Chitralis, Gujarati and other smaller groups. Smaller ethnic groups, such as Kashmiris, Kalash, Burusho, Khowar, Hazara, Shina, Kalyu and Balti are mainly found in the northern parts of the country. Pakistan's census does not include the 1.7 million citizens of Afghanistan,[1] who are mainly found in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
(KP) and Federally Administered Tribal Areas
Federally Administered Tribal Areas
(FATA) areas, with small numbers in the cities of Karachi
Karachi
and Quetta
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Brahui People
The Brahui (Brahui: براہوئی,) or Brahvi people are an ethnic group of about 2.2 million people with the vast majority found in Baluchistan, Pakistan.[1] They are a small minority group in Afghanistan, where they are native, but they are also found through their diaspora in Middle Eastern states.[2] They mainly occupy the area in Balochistan from Bolan Pass
Bolan Pass
through the Bolan Hills to Ras Muari (Cape Monze) on the Arabian sea, separating the Baloch people living to the east and west.[3][4] The Brahuis are almost entirely
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Khanqah
A khanqah or khaniqah (also transliterated as khankahs , khaneqa, khanegah or khaneqah (Persian: خانقاه‎)), also known as a ribat (رباط) – among other terms – is a building designed specifically for gatherings of a Sufi brotherhood or tariqa and is a place for spiritual retreat and character reformation. In the past, and to a lesser extent nowadays, they often served as hospices for saliks (Sufi travelers), Murids (initiates) and talibs (Islamic students). Khanqahs are very often found adjoined to dargahs (shrines of Sufi saints), mosques and madrasas (Islamic schools). In the Arab world, especially North Africa, the khanqah is known as a zāwiyah (Arabic: زاویه‎, plural zāwiyāt; also transliterated as zawiya, zāwiya or zaouia). In Turkey, Iran
Iran
and formerly Ottoman areas like Albania
Albania
and Bosnia, they are locally referred to as tekije (تكيه; also transliterated as tekke, tekyeh, teqe or takiyah)
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Burusho People
Chitral District, Hunza (Pakistan) Hari Parbat, Jammu and Kashmir (India)LanguagesBurushaski, Khowar[1]ReligionIsmaili Islam, historically Shamanism, Buddhism, Hinduism[2]Old Hunza woman in Karimabad, Hunza Valley, Gilgit-Baltistan, PakistanThe Burusho or Brusho, also known as the Hunza people or Botraj,[3][4] live in Hunza, Nagar, Chitral, and in valleys of Gilgit–Baltistan in northern Pakistan,[5] as well as in Jammu and Kashmir, India.[4][6] All of them are Ismaili Muslims, while also preserving their ethnic traditions
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