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Balrog
Balrogs /ˈbælrɒɡz/ are fictional creatures who appear in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth
Middle-earth
legendarium. Such creatures first appeared in print in his novel The Lord of the Rings, where the Fellowship of the Ring encounter one known as Durin's Bane
Durin's Bane
in the Mines of Moria. Balrogs figured in Tolkien's earlier writings that appeared posthumously in The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
and other books. Balrogs are described as tall and menacing beings that can shroud themselves in fire, darkness, and shadow. They frequently appeared armed with fiery whips "of many thongs",[1] and occasionally used long swords. In Tolkien's later conception, they could not be readily vanquished—a certain stature was required by the would-be hero
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Hobbit
Hobbits[1] are a fictional, diminutive, humanoid race who inhabit the lands of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fiction. They are also referred to as Halflings. Hobbits first appeared in the novel The Hobbit, whose titular hobbit is the protagonist Bilbo Baggins. The novel The Lord of the Rings includes as major characters the hobbits Frodo Baggins, Samwise Gamgee, Peregrin Took, and Meriadoc Brandybuck, as well as several other minor hobbit characters. Hobbits are also briefly mentioned in The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
and Unfinished Tales. According to the author in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings, hobbits are "relatives"[2] of the race of Men. Elsewhere, Tolkien describes Hobbits as a "variety"[3] or separate "branch"[4] of humans. Within the story, hobbits and other races seem aware of the similarities (hence the colloquial terms "Big People" and "Little People" used in Bree)
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Arda (Middle-earth)
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Arda is the name given to the Earth in an imaginary period of prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
and related material once existed. It included several seas and oceans, and the continents of Middle-earth, the Dark Lands, Aman (the Undying Lands), the island of Númenor, and other unknown lands left largely unnamed by Tolkien.Contents1 Overview 2 Name 3 Cosmology 4 Various states of Arda4.1 Arda Unmarred 4.2 Arda Marred 4.3 Arda Healed5 See also 6 Works cited 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] See also: Middle-earth Arda was part of Eä, the universe of all which exists. Arda was created, together with the rest of Eä, through the Music of the Ainur for the Children of Ilúvatar (that is, Elves and Men)
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Silmaril
The Silmarils ( Quenya
Quenya
pl. Silmarilli, radiance of pure light[1]) are three fictional brilliant jewels composed of the unmarred light of the Two Trees in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. The Silmarils were made out of the crystalline substance silima by Fëanor, a Noldorin Elf, in Valinor during the Years of the Trees.[2] The Silmarils play a central role in Tolkien's book The Silmarillion, which tells of the creation of (the Universe) and the beginning of Elves, Men, and Dwarves.Contents1 Appearance 2 Fictional history 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingAppearance[edit] How Fëanor, admittedly the greatest of the Noldor, was able to create these objects is not fully explained. Even the Valar, including Aulë, master of craftsmanship, could not copy them. In fact, even Fëanor may not have been able to copy them as part of his essence went into their making
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The Lays Of Beleriand
The Lays of Beleriand, published in 1985, is the third volume of Christopher Tolkien's 12-volume book series, The History of Middle-earth, in which he analyzes the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. The book contains the long "lays" or poems Tolkien
Tolkien
wrote: these are The Lay of the Children of Húrin about the saga of Túrin Turambar, and The Lay of Leithian (also called Release from Bondage) about Beren and Lúthien. Although Tolkien
Tolkien
abandoned them before their respective ends, they are both long enough to occupy many stanzas, each of which can last for over ten pages. The first poem is in alliterative verse, and the second is in rhyming couplets
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Fingolfin
Fingolfin
Fingolfin
(IPA: [fiŋˈɡolfin]) is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, appearing in The Silmarillion.Contents1 Internal history 2 Concept and creation 3 House of Fingolfin 4 In songs 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksInternal history[edit] Fingolfin
Fingolfin
was a High King
High King
of the Noldor in Beleriand, second eldest son of Finwë, full brother of Finarfin, and half-brother of Fëanor, who was the eldest of Finwë's sons. He founded the House of Fingolfin which ruled the Noldor in Middle-earth. His wife was Anairë
Anairë
and his children were Fingon, Turgon, Aredhel
Aredhel
and Argon.[1] Fingolfin
Fingolfin
was said to be the strongest, most steadfast, and most valiant of Finwë's sons
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J. R. R. Tolkien
First World WarBattle of the SommeJohn Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkiːn/;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings
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Valinor
Valinor (Land of the Valar) is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. It was also known as the Undying Lands, along with Tol Eressëa and the outliers of Aman. This latter name is somewhat misleading; the land itself, while blessed, did not cause mortals to live forever.[1] However, only immortal beings were generally allowed to reside there
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Angband
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy world of Middle-earth, Angband
Angband
(Sindarin for 'iron prison') is the name of the fortress of Melkor, constructed before the First Age, located in the Iron Mountains in the enemy's land Dor Daedeloth north of Beleriand.[1][2] The fortress is described in Tolkien's The Silmarillion. It was built by Melkor (later called Morgoth) to guard against a possible attack from Aman by the Valar. Nonetheless, the Valar's attack succeeded in capturing Morgoth and destroying his main stronghold Utumno. However, while the Valar had focused on destroying Utumno utterly, Angband, though devastated, was only partially destroyed. Over time, the dark creatures in Morgoth's service would gather in its ruined pits
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Númenor
Númenor
Númenor
/ˈnuːmɛnɔːr/, also called Elenna-nórë or Westernesse, is a fictional place in English author J. R. R. Tolkien's writings. It was a large island located in the Sundering Seas to the west of Middle-earth, the main setting of Tolkien's writings, and was known to be the greatest realm of Men. However, the inhabitants' cessation of the service to Eru Ilúvatar and rebellion against the Valar led to the downfall of the island and death of the majority of its population. The author had intended Númenor
Númenor
to be an allusion to the legendary Atlantis.[2] An unfinished story, Aldarion and Erendis, is set in the realm of Númenor
Númenor
at the time of its zenith, and another, Akallabêth, summarizes its history and downfall
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Elf (Middle-earth)
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Elves are one of the races that inhabit a fictional Earth, often called Middle-earth, and set in the remote past. They appear in The Hobbit and in The Lord of the Rings, but their complex history is described more fully in The Silmarillion. Tolkien
Tolkien
had been writing about Elves long before he published The Hobbit.Contents1 Development1.1 Background 1.2 Early writings 1.3 The Book of Lost Tales
The Book of Lost Tales
(c. 1917–1927) 1.4 The Hobbit (c. 1930–1937) 1.5 The Quenta Silmarillion
Silmarillion
(c. 1937) 1.6 The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
(c
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Christopher Tolkien
Christopher John Reuel Tolkien (born 21 November 1924) is the third son of the author J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
(1892–1973), and the editor of much of his father's posthumously published work. He drew the original maps for his father's The Lord of the Rings, which he signed C. J. R. T.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Editorial work on J. R. R. Tolkien's manuscripts 2.2 Reaction to filmed versions of J. R. R. Tolkien's works3 Personal life 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Christopher Tolkien was born in Leeds, the third and youngest son of John Ronald Reuel Tolkien and his wife, Edith Mary Tolkien (née Bratt)
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Quenya
Quenya
Quenya
(pronounced [ˈkʷɛnja][1]) is a fictional language devised by J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
and used by the Elves in his legendarium. Tolkien began devising the language around 1910 and restructured the grammar several times until Quenya
Quenya
reached its final state. The vocabulary remained relatively stable throughout the creation process. Also, the name of the language was repeatedly changed by Tolkien from Elfin and Qenya to the eventual Quenya. The Finnish language
Finnish language
had been a major source of inspiration, but Tolkien was also familiar with Latin, Greek, and ancient Germanic languages when he began constructing Quenya. Another notable feature of Tolkien's Elvish languages was his development of a complex internal history of characters to speak those tongues in their own fictional universe
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Sindarin
Sindarin
Sindarin
is a fictional language devised by J. R. R. Tolkien[1] for use in his fantasy stories set in Arda, primarily in Middle-earth. Sindarin
Sindarin
is one of the many languages spoken by the immortal Elves, called the Eledhrim [ɛˈlɛðrim] or Edhellim [ɛˈðɛllim] in Sindarin. The word Sindarin
Sindarin
is itself a Quenya
Quenya
form. The only known Sindarin
Sindarin
word for this language is Eglathrin,[2] a word probably only used in the First Age (see Eglath). Called in English "Grey-elvish" or "Grey-elven", it was the language of the Sindarin
Sindarin
Elves of Beleriand. These were Elves of the Third Clan who remained behind in Beleriand after the Great Journey
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Flaming Sword (mythology)
In Sumerian mythology, the deity known as Asaruludu
Asaruludu
is "the wielder of the flaming sword" who "ensures the most perfect safety". According to the Bible, a cherub (or the archangel Uriel
Uriel
in some traditions) with a flaming sword was placed by God at the gates of Paradise
Paradise
after Adam and Eve
Adam and Eve
were banished from it (Genesis 3:24). Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
tradition says that after Jesus
Jesus
was crucified and resurrected, the flaming sword was removed from the Garden of Eden, making it possible for humanity to re-enter Paradise.[1] In Welsh mythology
Welsh mythology
the Dyrnwyn ("White-Hilt") is said to be a powerful sword belonging to Rhydderch Hael,[2] one of the Three Generous Men of Britain mentioned in the Welsh Triads
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Fall Of Gondolin
In the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, the "Fall of Gondolin" is the name of one of the original Lost Tales which formed the basis for a section in his later work, The Silmarillion. "The Fall of Gondolin" tells of the founding of the Elven city of Gondolin
Gondolin
(built in secret by Turgon
Turgon
and his people), of the arrival of Tuor, a prince of the Edain, of the betrayal of the city to Morgoth by Turgon's nephew Maeglin, and of its subsequent destruction by Morgoth's armies. It also relates the flight of the fugitives to the Havens of Sirion, the wedding of Tuor
Tuor
and Idril, as well as the childhood of Eärendil. Tolkien
Tolkien
began writing the story that would become "The Fall of Gondolin" in 1917 in an army barracks on the back of a sheet of military marching music
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