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Ballysadare
Ballysadare
Ballysadare
(Irish: Baile Easa Dara, meaning "settlement of the cascades of the oak"), locally Ballisodare, is a village in County Sligo, Ireland.[2] It is located about 7 kilometres (4 miles) south of Sligo
Sligo
town. The town developed on an important crossing of the Owenmore River.Contents1 Location and naming 2 Early history2.1 Saint Féichín 2.2 The Mines 2.3 Recent history3 Education 4 Transport 5 See also 6 References 7 Ballysadare
Ballysadare
Gallery 8 External linksLocation and naming[edit] The Ox Mountains
Ox Mountains
(Irish: Sliabh Gamh) are located west of the village. The village itself is named after the falls on the Owenmore River. Ballysadare
Ballysadare
is in the barony of Leyny, formerly the túath of Lúighne
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Celtic Tiger
"Celtic Tiger" (Irish: An Tíogar Ceilteach) is a term referring to the economy of the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
from the mid-1990s to the late-2000s, a period of rapid real economic growth fuelled by foreign direct investment. The boom was dampened by a subsequent property bubble which resulted in a severe economic downturn. At the start of the 1990s, Ireland
Ireland
was a poor country by West European standards, with high poverty, unemployment, inflation, and low growth.[1] The Irish economy expanded at an average rate of 9.4% between 1995 and 2000 following the institution of free education to second level and then third level, which produced a generation of well-educated entrepreneurs,[2] and continued to grow at an average rate of 5.9% during the following decade until 2008, when it fell into recession
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Nagnata
Nagnata or Magnata (Νάγνατα, Μάγνατα) is a town noted on the co-ordinate map of the 2nd century AD Alexandrian scholar Claudius Ptolemy. It is located in northwest Hibernia between the mouths of the rivers Ravius (Ῥαουίος), perhaps the Erne, and Libnius (Λιβνίος), perhaps the Moy.[1] This is the only town noted on the Irish west, southern or northern coast. Surviving manuscripts of Ptolemy’s Geography refers to the towns Hibernis (Teamhair’Erann), Rhaeba (Cruchain) and Magnata (Sligo) as "opismoi" an Ancient Greek word meaning "designated" or "distinguished". Much of his work was based on the now lost geography of Marinus of Tyre. As there were no towns in the classical sense in early Ireland and as Ptolemy’s information was derived indirectly through traders, it is likely that the places which he calls cities were ancient places of assembly and hence trade
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Claudius Ptolemy
Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos [kláwdios ptolɛmɛ́ːos]; Latin: Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemaeus; c. AD 100 – c. 170)[2] was a Greco-Roman[3] mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.[4][5] He lived in the city of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Roman province of Egypt, wrote in Koine Greek, and held Roman citizenship.[6] The 14th-century astronomer Theodore Meliteniotes gave his birthplace as the prominent Greek city Ptolemais Hermiou
Ptolemais Hermiou
(Greek: Πτολεμαΐς ‘Ερμείου) in the Thebaid
Thebaid
(Greek: Θηβαΐδα [Θηβαΐς])
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Republic Of Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)), also known as the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe
Europe
occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern part of the island, and whose metropolitan area is home to around a third of the country's 4.75 million inhabitants. The state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, Saint George's Channel
Saint George's Channel
to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east
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Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae
Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae is the abbreviated title of a celebrated work on the Irish saints by the Franciscan, John Colgan (Leuven, 1645).[1] Aided by Father Hugh Ward, O.F.M., Father Stephen White, S.J., and Brother Míchél Ó Cléirigh, O.F.M., Colgan sedulously collected enormous material for the Lives of the Irish Saints, and at length, after thirty years of sifting and digesting his materials, put to press his Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae, a portion of the expense of which was defrayed by Archbishop O'Reilly of Armagh. The first volume, covering 270 lives of Irish saints (except Brigid and Patrick) for the months of January, February, and March, was intended to be the third volume of the Ecclesiastical Antiquities of Ireland, but only one volume was printed at Leuven in 1645. A replica was produced in Dublin in 1948.[2] References[edit]^ The full title runs as follows: Acta Sanctorum veteris et majoris Scotiae, seu Hiberniae, Sanctorum Insulae, partim ex variis per Europam MSS
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Nath Í Of Achonry
Saint Nath Í, or Crumnathy,[1] (fl. 6th century) was an early Irish saint who was remembered as the founder of Achonry. He is said to have been born in the barony of Leyney, in present-day Co. Sligo. In the 17th century, John Colgan compiled a Latin Life of St Cormac, published in the Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae series, which relates that Cormac left his native Munster for Connacht and arrived in the area of Leyney. When Niall, the brother of the local chieftain Diarmait, begged the saint for a blessing, Cormac revealed that he was to have a son by the name of Conamel, whose descendants would include a number of illustrious saints, such as Náth Í "the priest". In the Martyrology of Donegal (9 August), he is described as the priest (cruimthir) Nath Í of Achad Cain Conairi. He is said to have studied under St Finnián of Clonard
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Erenagh
The medieval Irish office of erenagh Irish: airchinneach was responsible for receiving parish revenue from tithes and rents, building and maintaining church property and overseeing the termonn lands that generated parish income. Thus he had a prebendary role. The erenagh originally had a tonsure but took no other holy orders; he had a voice in the Chapter when they consulted about revenues, paid a yearly rent to the Bishop and a fine on the marriage of each daughter. The role usually passed down from generation to generation in certain families in each parish. After the Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries the role of erenagh became subsumed in the responsibilities of the parson in each parish. Surname[edit] The common surname McInerney
McInerney
is derived from the Irish, Mac an Airchinnigh (son of the erenagh). As may be supposed, this surname arose in various areas in Ireland leading to numerous unrelated bearers of the name
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Canons Regular Of St. Augustine
Canons regular are priests in the Western Church living in community under a rule ("regula" in Latin), and sharing their property in common.Contents1 Preliminary distinctions 2 Background 3 History3.1 Ordo Antiquus3.1.1 Augustine 3.1.2 Chrodegang and the Rule of Aix3.2 Reforms 3.3 Ordo Novo3.3.1 England 3.3.2 Scotland 3.3.3 Ireland4 Present-Day Organization4.1 Canons Regular of Saint Augustine 4.2 Confederation5 Other orders5.1 The Norbertines 5.2 The Crosiers6 Extinct congregations 7 Canonesses regular 8 Influence 9 Notable figures 10 See also 11 Notes 12 External linksPreliminary distinctions[edit] All canons regular are to be distinguished from secular canons who belong to a community of priests attached to a church but do not take vows or live in common under a Rule. Among canons regular most, but not all, have followed the Rule of St. Augustine and thus have been called Augustinian Canons, known so
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Central Statistics Office (Ireland)
The Central Statistics Office (CSO; Irish: An Phríomh-Oifig Staidrimh) is the statistical agency responsible for the gathering of "information relating to economic, social and general activities and conditions" in Ireland, in particular the National Census
Census
which is held every five years
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Lúighne
Leyney (Luíghne) is a barony in central Co. Sligo.[1] It corresponds to the ancient túath of Luíghne.[2][3] Location[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (April 2014)History[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (May 2014)References[edit]^ "Sligo History Project - Luighne". Allismotion.webs.com. Retrieved 2014-04-26.  ^ "Ireland's History in Maps - Connacht, Connaught - Dynasties and Territories". Ancestry.com. Retrieved February 17, 2016.  ^ "The Irish Archaeological Society". 9. Irish Archaeological Society. 1844: 493. Retrieved 2014-04-26. This article related to the geography of County Sligo, Ireland
Ireland
is a stub
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Department Of Arts, Heritage And The Gaeltacht
The Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
(Irish: An Roinn Cultúir, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta) is a department of the Government of Ireland. The mission of the department is to promote and develop Ireland’s arts, culture and heritage; to advance the use of the Irish language
Irish language
and to facilitate sustainable regional and rural development, including the development of the Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
and Islands. It is led by the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht who is assisted by one Minister of State.Contents1 Departmental team 2 Overview 3 History3.1 Statutes4 References 5 External linksDepartmental team[edit] The official headquarters and ministerial offices of the department are at 23 Kildare Street, Dublin
Dublin
2
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Dublin City University
Dublin
Dublin
City University
University
(abbreviated as DCU) (Irish: Ollscoil Chathair Bhaile Átha Cliath) is a university situated on the Northside of Dublin
Dublin
in Ireland. Created as the National Institute for Higher Education, Dublin, it enrolled its first students in 1980 and was elevated to university status (along with the University
University
of Limerick) in 1989 by statute
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Church Of Ireland
The Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
(Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann[3]) is a Christian church
Christian church
in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second-largest Christian church
Christian church
on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican
Anglican
churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Bishop of Rome. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation
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