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Balkans
The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe
Europe
with various and disputed definitions.[1][2] The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
that stretch from the Serbian-Bulgarian border to the Black Sea. The Balkan Peninsula
Peninsula
is bordered by the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
on the northwest, the Ionian Sea
Ionian Sea
on the southwest, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
in the south and southeast, and the Black Sea
Black Sea
on the east and northeast. The northern border of the peninsula is variously defined
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Zeus
Zeus
Zeus
(/zjuːs/;[3] Greek: Ζεύς Zeús [zdeǔ̯s])[4] is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter. His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to those of Indo-European deities such as Indra, Jupiter, Perkūnas, Perun, Thor, and Odin.[5][6][7] Zeus
Zeus
is the child of Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach. In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.[8] At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad
Iliad
states that he fathered Aphrodite.[11] Zeus was also infamous for his erotic escapades
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August Zeune
Johann August Zeune (12 May 1778 –14 November 1853) was a German teacher of geography and Germanic languages, as well as the founder of the Berlin Foundation for the Blind.Johann August ZeuneLife[edit] Zeune was born on 12 May 1778 in Lutherstadt Wittenberg
Wittenberg
as the son of Johann Karl Zeune, professor of Greek at the University of Wittenberg. In his parents' house, he was educated by his father and tutor. In 1798 Zeune started studying at the Wittenberg
Wittenberg
University enrolled. He graduated with his thesis on the history of geography, and was awarded for a short time the dignity of an academic faculty, as a Quasi-professor of Geography. His novel „Höhenschichten-Karte” "Topological map" of the earth, had made him famous in academic circles. In 1803, he moved to Berlin and became a teacher at the Gymnasium zum Grauen Kloster (gray convent school)
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Balkan Daglary
The Uly Balkan, also known as the Great Balkan Range is a mountain range in Turkmenistan.[1] The highest summit is Mount Arlan at 1,880 metres (6,170 ft).Part of the Balkan range in the background.References[edit]^ Uly Balkan
Uly Balkan
in the Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 196
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Persian Language
Persian (/ˈpɜːrʒən/ or /ˈpɜːrʃən/), also known by its endonym Farsi[8][9] (فارسی fārsi [fɒːɾˈsiː] ( listen)), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(officially known as Dari since 1958),[10] and Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(officially known as Tajiki since the Soviet era),[11] and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran
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Peninsula
A peninsula (Latin: paeninsula from paene "almost” and insula "island") is a piece of land surrounded by water on the majority of its border, while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. Examples are the Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan, the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
and the Malay peninsula.[1][2][3][4] The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit.[5] A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape.[6] A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the (almost closed) loop of water
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Aegean Sea
The Aegean Sea
Sea
(/ɪˈdʒiːən/; Greek: Αιγαίο Πέλαγος [eˈʝeo ˈpelaɣos] ( listen); Turkish: Ege Denizi Turkish pronunciation: [eɟe denizi])[stress?] is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas, i.e., between the mainlands of Greece
Greece
and Turkey. In the north, the Aegean is connected to the Marmara Sea
Sea
and Black Sea
Sea
by the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
and Bosphorus
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Typhon
Typhon
Typhon
(/ˈtaɪfɒn, -fən/; Greek: Τυφῶν, Tuphōn [typʰɔ̂ːn]), also Typhoeus (/taɪˈfiːəs/; Τυφωεύς, Tuphōeus), Typhaon (Τυφάων, Tuphaōn) or Typhos (Τυφώς, Tuphōs), was a monstrous serpentine giant and the most deadly creature in Greek mythology. According to Hesiod, Typhon
Typhon
was the son of Gaia and Tartarus. However one source has Typhon
Typhon
as the son of Hera alone, while another makes Typhon
Typhon
the offspring of Cronus. Typhon
Typhon
and his mate Echidna were the progenitors of many famous monsters. Typhon
Typhon
attempted to overthrow Zeus
Zeus
for the supremacy of the cosmos. The two fought a cataclysmic battle, which Zeus
Zeus
finally won with the aid of his thunderbolts
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Ionian Sea
The Ionian Sea
Sea
(Greek: Ιόνιο Πέλαγος, Greek pronunciation: [iˈonio ˈpelaɣos], Italian: Mar Ionio, Italian pronunciation: [mar ˈjɔːnjo], Albanian: Deti Jon, Albanian pronunciation: [dɛti jɔ:n]) is an elongated bay of the Mediterranean Sea, south of the Adriatic Sea. It is bounded by southern Italy
Italy
including Calabria, Sicily, and the Salento
Salento
peninsula to the west, southern Albania
Albania
to the north, and the west coast of Greece. All major islands in the sea belong to Greece. They are collectively named the Ionian Islands, the main ones being Corfu, Zakynthos, Kephalonia, Ithaca, and Lefkada
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Haemus Mons
In earlier times, the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
were known as the Haemus Mons (/ˈhiːməs ˈmɒnz/). It is believed that the name is derived from a Thracian word *saimon, 'mountain ridge', which is unattested but conjectured as the original Thracian form of Greek Emos.[citation needed] Another classic etymology derives the name 'Haemos' from the myth about the fight of Zeus and the dragon Typhon:“He was again driven to Thrace and hurled entire mountains at Zeus in the battle around Mount Haemus. When these bounced back upon him under the force of the thunderbolt, blood gushed out on the mountain. From this, they say, the mountain is called Haemus (“bloody”).”[1]In antiquity, the mountain range and the area around it was populated by free Thracian peoples such as the Bessi, Dii, and Satrae
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Soča
The Soča
Soča
(pronounced [ˈsoːtʃa] in Slovene) or Isonzo (pronounced [iˈzontso] in Italian; other names Friulian: Lusinç, German: Sontig, Latin: Aesontius or Isontius[2]) is a 138-kilometre (86 mi) long river that flows through western Slovenia
Slovenia
(96 kilometres or 60 miles) and northeastern Italy
Italy
(43 kilometres or 27 miles).[3] An Alpine river in character, its source lies in the Trenta Valley
Trenta Valley
in the Julian Alps
Julian Alps
in northwestern Slovenia, at an elevation of 876 metres (2,874 ft).[3] The river runs past the towns of Bovec, Kobarid, Tolmin, Kanal ob Soči, Nova Gorica
Nova Gorica
(where it is crossed by the Solkan
Solkan
Bridge), and Gorizia, entering the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
close to the town of Monfalcone
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Southeast European Times
Southeast European Times was a United States European Command-sponsored news website dedicated to coverage of Southeast Europe that ended publication in March 2015. The countries covered included Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, and Turkey The primary address of the website was setimes.com, though it was also available under the addresses: balkan-info.com and balkantimes.com. It started online as Balkan-Info in October 1999,[1] as Balkan Times in May 2001 [2] and finally as SETimes in October 2002.[3] The content of the website was available in ten languages: Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, English, Greek, Macedonian, Romanian, Serbian, Russian and Turkish. References[edit]^ "Alexa:Balkan Info".  ^ "Alexa:Balkan Times".  ^ "Alexa:SETimes". External links[edit]Official website (dead link)This article about a news website is a stub
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Ottoman Turkish Language
Ottoman Turkish (/ˈɒtəmən/; Turkish: Osmanlı Türkçesi), or the Ottoman language (Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانى‎, lisân-ı Osmânî, also known as تركجه‎, Türkçe or تركی‎, Türkî, "Turkish"; Turkish: Osmanlıca), is the variety of the Turkish language
Turkish language
that was used in the Ottoman Empire. It borrows, in all aspects, extensively from Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and it was written in the Ottoman Turkish alphabet
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Central Asia
Central Asia
Asia
stretches from the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
in the west to China
China
in the east and from Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the south to Russia
Russia
in the north. It is also colloquially referred to as "the stans" as the countries generally considered to be within the region all have names ending with the Persian suffix "-stan", meaning "land of".[1] Central Asia
Asia
has a population of about 70 million, consisting of five republics: Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(pop. 18 million), Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
(6 million), Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(9 million), Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
(6 million), and Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
(31 million). Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(pop
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Musala
Musala
Musala
(Bulgarian: Мусала); from Arabic through Ottoman Turkish: from Musalla, "near God" or "place for prayer" [1][2] is the highest peak in the entire Balkan Peninsula, standing at 2,925 m (9,596 ft). The summit of the Rila
Rila
mountain range in southwestern Bulgaria, Musala
Musala
is the highest peak between the Alps
Alps
and the Caucasus and the highest in Eastern Europe bar the Caucasus
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