HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Balashankar Kantharia
Balashankar Ullasram Kantharia[1] was a Gujarati poet.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Balashankar Kantharia was born on 17 May 1858 in Sathodar Nagar Brahmin family in Nadiad
Nadiad
(now in Gujarat, India).[2][3] He had studied till the first year of his college. He was polyglot and knew Gujarati, Persian, Arabic, Sanskrit, Braj and Hindi languages as well as music and archeology.[2] He briefly worked in government service. He managed Bharati Bhusan, Itihas Mala, Krishna Mahoday magazines. He served as an editor of Buddhiprakash
Buddhiprakash
magazine briefly.[2] He is considered as the founder of the modern Gujarati poetry and Ghazal. Manilal Dwivedi was his close friend
[...More...]

"Balashankar Kantharia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nadiad
Nadiad is a city and an administrative centre of the Kheda district in the Indian state of Gujarat and the 8th largest city in the state of Gujarat.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Climate 4 Demographics 5 Scholars and personalities 6 Education 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The city of Nadiad is said to have been settled by rope dancers, hence the historical name of "Natapadra" (outskirts of/for natas) or "Natpur" (city for natas). It is also referred to as 'Nandgam'. The city has nine routes, and on each route there is a step well. The city is also well known for the number 9: there are 9 villages or towns located to all the 9 roads that exit from Nadiad; 9 step wells around the city; and 9 lakes in the city
[...More...]

"Nadiad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kalapi
Sursinhji Takhtasinhji Gohil (Gujarati:સુરસિંહજી તખ્તસિંહજી ગોહિલ) (1874–1900), popularly known by his pen name, Kalapi (Gujarati:કલાપી) was a poet and the royal of Lathi state in Gujarat. He lived in Lathi-Gohilwad, which is located in the Saurashtra region of Gujarat.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Kalapi award 4 In popular culture 5 References 6 Other sources 7 External linksLife[edit]Rajba a.k.a. RamaKesharba a.k.a. AnandibaMonghi a.k.a. ShobhanaSursinhji was born to the royal family of Lathi in 1874. His mother's name was Ramba. He had a very short life of 26 years, and died in 1900. He was educated at Rajkumar College, Rajkot. He was married to two princesses. Rajba-Ramaba, the princess of Kutch - Roha, and Kesharba-Anandiba, the Princess of Saurashtra-Kotada at the age of 15. Ramaba was elder to Sursinhji by eight years, while Anandiba was elder to him by two years
[...More...]

"Kalapi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hafez
Khwāja Shams-ud-Dīn Muḥammad Ḥāfeẓ-e Shīrāzī (Persian: خواجه شمس‌‌الدین محمد حافظ شیرازی‎), known by his pen name Hafez
Hafez
(حافظ Ḥāfeẓ 'the memorizer; the (safe) keeper'; 1315-1390), was a Persian poet[1][2] who "lauded the joys of love and wine but also targeted religious hypocrisy."[3] His collected works are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature
Persian literature
and are often found in the homes of people in the Persian speaking world, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings
[...More...]

"Hafez" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sufism In India
Sufism has a history in India evolving for over 1,000 years.[1] The presence of Sufism has been a leading entity increasing the reaches of Islam throughout South Asia.[2] Following the entrance of Islam in the early 8th century, Sufi mystic traditions became more visible during the 10th and 11th centuries of the Delhi Sultanate.[3] A conglomeration of four chronologically separate dynasties, the early Delhi Sultanate consisted of rulers from Turkic and Afghan lands.[4] This Persian influence flooded South Asia with Islam, Sufi thought, syncretic values, literature, education, and entertainment that has created an enduring impact on the presence of Islam in India today.[5] Sufi preachers, merchants and missionaries also settled in coastal Bengal and Gujarat through maritime voyages and trade. Various leaders of Sufi orders, Tariqa, chartered the first organized activities to introduce localities to Islam through Sufism
[...More...]

"Sufism In India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mṛcchakatika
Mṛcchakaṭika (The Little Clay Cart) (Sanskrit: मृच्छकटिका; also spelled Mṛcchakaṭikā, Mrchchhakatika, Mricchakatika, or Mrichchhakatika, is a ten-act Sanskrit drama attributed to Śūdraka (Sanskrit: शूद्रक), an ancient playwright generally thought to have lived sometime between the third century BC and the fifth century AD whom the prologue identifies as a Kshatriya king and a devotee of Siva who lived for 100 years.[1] The play is set in the ancient city of Ujjayini during the reign of the King Pālaka, near the end of the Pradyota dynasty that made up the first quarter of the fifth century BC.[2] The central story is that of noble but impoverished young Brahmin, Chārudatta (Sanskrit: चारुदत्त), who falls in love with a wealthy courtesan or nagarvadhu, Vasantasenā (Sanskrit: वसन्तसेना)
[...More...]

"Mṛcchakatika" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rajasekhara
Rajashekhara (IAST: Rājaśekhara; fl. 10th century[1]) was an eminent Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poet, dramatist and critic. He was the court poet of the Gurjara Pratiharas.[2] Rajashekhara wrote the Kavyamimamsa between 880 and 920 CE. The work is essentially a practical guide for poets that explains the elements and composition of a good poem.[3] He is most noted for the Karpuramanjari, a play written in Sauraseni Prakrit. Rajashekhara wrote the play to please his wife, Avantisundari, a woman of taste and accomplishment. Rajashekhara is perhaps the only ancient Indian poet to acknowledge a woman for her contributions to his literary career.[1] Life[edit] In his Bālarāmāyaṇa and Kāvyamimāṃsa, Rajashekhara referred himself by his family name Yāyāvara or Yāyāvarīya. In Bālarāmāyaṇa, he mentioned that his great grandfather Akalajalada belonged to Maharashtra
[...More...]

"Rajasekhara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gujarati Literature
The history of Gujarati (ગુજરાતી સાહિત્ય) literature may be traced to 1000 AD,[1] and this literature has flourished since then to the present
[...More...]

"Gujarati Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Persian Poetry
Persian literature
Persian literature
(Persian: ادبیات فارسی‎ adabiyāt-e fārsi), comprises oral compositions and written texts in the Persian language and it is one of the world's oldest literatures.[1][2][3] It spans two-and-a-half millennia, though much of the pre-Islamic material has been lost. Its sources have been within Greater Iran including present-day Iran, Iraq, the Caucasus, and Turkey, regions of Central and South Asia
South Asia
where the Persian language
Persian language
has historically been either the native or official language. For instance, Mowlana Rumi, one of best-loved Persian poets born in Balkh
Balkh
or Vakhsh (in what is now Afghanistan), wrote in Persian and lived in Konya, then the capital of the Seljuks in Anatolia
[...More...]

"Persian Poetry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baroda
Vadodara
Vadodara
(Gujarati pronunciation: [ʋəˈɽod̪əɾa]; formerly known as Baroda) is the third-largest[7] city in the Western Indian state of Gujarat, after Ahmedabad
Ahmedabad
and Surat. It is the administrative headquarters of Vadodara District
Vadodara District
and is located on the banks of the Vishwamitri
Vishwamitri
river, 139 kilometres (86 mi) from the state capital Gandhinagar. The railway line and NH 8 that connect Delhi
Delhi
and Mumbai pass through Vadodara. As of 2011[update], Vadodara
Vadodara
had a population of almost 1.8 million+ people.[8] The city is known for the Lakshmi Vilas Palace, the residence of Baroda State's Maratha
Maratha
royal family, the Gaekwads. It is also the home of the Maharaja
Maharaja
Sayajirao University of Baroda, the largest university in Gujarat
[...More...]

"Baroda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Metre (poetry)
In poetry, metre is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody
[...More...]

"Metre (poetry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gujarat
†The state of Bombay was divided into two states i.e. Maharashtra and Gujarat
Gujarat
by the Bombay (Reorganisation) Act 1960Symbols of Gujarat[4](de facto)Language Gujarati[3]Song "Jai Jai Garavi Gujarat" by Narmad[5]Calendar SakaAnimal Asiatic lion[4]Bird Greater flamingo[4]Flower Marigold (galgota)[4]Fruit Mango[6]Tree Banyan[4] Gujarat
Gujarat
(/ˌɡʊdʒəˈrɑːt/ Gujarat  ['gudʒəɾɑt̪] ( listen)) is a state in Western India[3][7][8][9][10] and Northwest India[11][12][13][14] with an area of 196,024 km2 (75,685 sq mi), a coastline of 1,600 km (990 mi)–most of which lies on the Kathiawar peninsula, and a population in excess of 60 million
[...More...]

"Gujarat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dalpatram
Dalpatram
Dalpatram
Dahyabhai Travadi (Gujarati: દલપતરામ ડાહ્યાભાઈ ત્રવાડી) (1820-1898) was a Gujarati language
Gujarati language
poet during 19th century in India. He was the father of Nanalal Dalpatram
Dalpatram
Kavi, a poet.Contents1 Life 2 Career 3 Statue and Memorial 4 Legacy 5 Works 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Dalpatram
Dalpatram
was born on 21 January 1820 at Wadhwan
Wadhwan
city of Surendranagar district in a Brahmin
Brahmin
family. Dalpatram
Dalpatram
grew up to the resonant chanting of 'mantras' and recitations of religious scriptures. He was a child prodigy and displayed his extraordinary literary skills by composing 'hondulas' at the age of 12
[...More...]

"Dalpatram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Manilal Dwivedi
Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (Gujarati: મણિલાલ નભુભાઇ દ્વિવેદી) (26 September 1858 – 10 October 1898) was a poet, novel-writer and essayist in Gujarati literature. He was a well-known philosopher as well.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Nadiad, Gujarat in 1858. He completed primary and secondary education in Nadiad. He failed in Sanskrit in matriculation examination in 1875 but he was ranked second in examination in Bombay University the next year winning James Tylor prize. He joined Elphinstone College in 1877 and completed Bachelor of Arts in History and Politics in 1880. On insistence by his father to earn, he left studies but completed MA by studying himself. He returned to Nadiad and joined Government High School in July 1880 as an assistant teacher. In 1881, he was transferred to Bombay as a Deputy Education Inspector of girls schools
[...More...]

"Manilal Dwivedi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Buddhiprakash
Buddhiprakash (Gujarati: બુદ્ધિપ્રકાશ, English: Light of Knowledge) is a Gujarati language magazine published by Gujarat Vidhya Sabha (formerly known as Gujarat Vernacular Society), Ahmedabad, India. History[edit]Issue of 7 March 1854Buddhiprakash was established in 1850[1] as a lithotype fortnightly. The first issue of magazine was published on 15 May 1850 from Ahmedabad. The first issue had 16 pages covering articles on 26 subjects ranging from science and technology to philosophy. It costed 1.5 Anna to readers per issue then. After one and half year of publication, it was closed.[2][3][4] Later in April 1854, with the help of Rao Bahadur Bhogilal Pranvallabhdas and under guidance of T. B. Cartis, a principal of English school, it resumed publication by the students of high school[which?] of Ahmedabad. In 1855, on request of Alexander Kinloch Forbes, Dalpatram accepted to serve as editor of magazine. Dalpatram edited it till 1879
[...More...]

"Buddhiprakash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.