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Bagnères-de-Bigorre
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Bagnères-de- Bigorre
Bigorre
(IPA: [baɲɛːʁ də biɡɔːʁ] ( listen); Occitan: Banhèras de Bigòrra pronounced [baˈɲɛɾɔs de biˈɡɔrɔ]) is a commune and subprefecture of the
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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French Department
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandIn the administrative divisions of France, the department (French: département, pronounced [depaʁt(ə)mɑ̃]) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune. There are 96 departments in metropolitan France, and 5 overseas departments, which are also classified as regions
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Occitan Language
Occitan
Occitan
(English: /ˈɒksɪtən, -tæn, -tɑːn/;[8][9] Occitan: [utsiˈta];[10] French: [ɔksitɑ̃]), also known as lenga d'òc (Occitan: [ˈleŋɡɔ ˈðɔ(k)] ( listen); French: langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language. It is spoken in southern France, Italy's Occitan
Occitan
Valleys, Monaco, and Spain's Val d'Aran; collectively, these regions are sometimes referred to as Occitania. Occitan
Occitan
is also spoken in the linguistic enclave of Guardia Piemontese
Guardia Piemontese
(Calabria, Italy). However, there is controversy about the unity of the language, as some think that Occitan
Occitan
is a macrolanguage
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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Vicus
In Ancient Rome, the vicus (plural vici) was a neighborhood or settlement. During the Republican era, the four regiones of the city of Rome were subdivided into vici. In the 1st century BC, Augustus reorganized the city for administrative purposes into 14 regions, comprising 265 vici.[1] Each vicus had its own board of officials who oversaw local matters. These administrative divisions are recorded as still in effect at least through the mid-4th century.[2][3] The Latin
Latin
word vicus was also applied to the smallest administrative unit of a provincial town within the Roman Empire, and to an ad hoc provincial civilian settlement that sprang up close to and because of a nearby official Roman site, usually a military garrison or state-owned mining operation.Contents1 Local government in Rome 2 Ad hoc settlements 3 Modern placenames 4 See also 5 ReferencesLocal government in Rome[edit] See also: 14 regions of Augustan RomeThis section needs expansion
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Communes Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandThe commune (French pronunciation: ​[kɔmyn]) is a level of administrative division in the French Republic. French communes are roughly equivalent to civil townships and incorporated municipalities in the United States
United States
or Gemeinden in Germany. The United Kingdom has no exact equivalent, as communes resemble districts in urban areas, but are closer to parishes in rural areas where districts are much larger
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Comminges
The Comminges (French: Comminges; Gascon: Comenge) is an ancient region of southern France in the foothills of the Pyrenees, corresponding closely to the arrondissement of Saint-Gaudens in the department of Haute-Garonne. This natural region is normally associated with the former domain of the Counts of Comminges, although an alternate definition is based on the Ancient Diocese of Comminges, which appeared originally to include more of what is now part of Aragon.Contents1 History 2 In Film and Television 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources and external linksHistory[edit]Comminges takes its name from the second part of its Ancient capital Lugdunum Convenarum : Convenae, Latin for 'those gathered', a founded as Roman colony colony in 72 B.C. by the Roman General Pompey, while on the way back to Rome after a military campaign in Spain, to defend the passage to the Aran Valley and the Iberian peninsula
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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INSEE Code
The INSEE code is a numerical indexing code used by the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) to identify various entities, including communes, départements. They are also used as national identification numbers given to people.Contents1 Created under Vichy 2 National identification numbers 3 History 4 SIREN and SIRET codes 5 Geographical codes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCreated under Vichy[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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List Of Roman Generals
Roman generals were often career statesmen, remembered by history for reasons other than their service in the Roman Army
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Julius Caesar
Gaius Julius Caesar[a] (/ˈsiːzər/; 12 or 13 July 100 BC[1] – 15 March 44 BC),[2] usually called Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the rise of the Roman Empire. He is also known as a notable author of Latin
Latin
prose. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus
Crassus
and Pompey
Pompey
formed a political alliance that dominated Roman politics
Roman politics
for several years. Their attempts to amass power as Populares were opposed by the Optimates within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger
Cato the Younger
with the frequent support of Cicero
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Roman Province
In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic, and, until the Tetrarchy
Tetrarchy
(293 AD), largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in modern English has its origins in the term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial rank, usually former consuls or former praetors. A later exception was the province of Egypt, incorporated by Augustus
Augustus
after the death of Cleopatra: it was ruled by a governor of equestrian rank only, perhaps as a discouragement to senatorial ambition
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Gallia Aquitania
Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania (Latin pronunciation: [ˈɡalːia akʷiːˈtaːnia][1]), also known as Aquitaine
Aquitaine
or Aquitaine
Aquitaine
Gaul, was a province of the Roman Empire. It lies in present-day southwest France, where it gives its name to the modern region of Aquitaine. It was bordered by the provinces of Gallia
Gallia
Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis.[2]Contents1 Tribes of Aquitania 2 Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania and Rome 3 Late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the Visigoths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTribes of Aquitania[edit] Fourteen Celtic tribes and twenty Aquitanian tribes occupied the northern parts of the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
and, from the country of the Cemmenus to the ocean, bounded by two rivers: the Garumna (Garonne) and the Liger (Loire)
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