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Bachir Gemayel
Bachir Gemayel
Bachir Gemayel
(Arabic: بشير الجميّل‎ Bashīr al-Jimayyel, also romanized al-Jumayyil and El Gemaiel. Arabic pronunciation: [baˈʃiːr ʤɪ'ma.jjɪl]; 10 November 1947 – 14 September 1982) was a Lebanese leader and president-elect. He was a senior member of the Phalange
Phalange
party and the supreme commander of the Lebanese Forces
Lebanese Forces
militia during the early years of the Lebanese Civil War (1975–90). He was elected president on 23 August 1982 while the country was torn by civil war and occupied by both Israel
Israel
and Syria. He was assassinated on 14 September 1982, along with 26 others, when a bomb exploded in the Beirut
Beirut
Phalange
Phalange
headquarters
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President Of Lebanon
The President of the Lebanese Republic is the head of state of Lebanon. The president is elected by the parliament for a term of six years, which is not immediately renewable. By convention, the president is always a Maronite Christian.Contents1 History 2 Office2.1 Qualifications 2.2 Role and responsibilities 2.3 Symbolic Roles and Duties3 Election3.1 Quorum for an election4 Official State car 5 List of presidents 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Main article: Lebanese presidential election, 2014–2016 From the expiration of the term of President Michel Suleiman
Michel Suleiman
in May 2014 until October 31, 2016, the parliament was unable to obtain the majority required to elect a president, and the office was vacant for almost two and a half years, despite more than 30 votes being held. In response to the deadlock, Youmna Maksoud suggested amending the constitution to make the presidency popularly elected
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Lebanese General Election, 2009
Fouad Siniora March 14Elected Prime Minister Saad Hariri March 14LebanonThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of LebanonConstitutionConstitution of 1926ExecutivePresidentList of presidents Incumbent: Michel AounPrime MinisterList of prime minister Incumbent: Saad HaririCabinetPast CabinetsLegislatureParliamentSpeakerNabih BerriCurrent membersPolitical partiesLebanese Forces Movement of the Future Kataeb Party Hezbollah Free Patriotic Movement Syrian Social Nationalist PartyElectionsPresidential: 2008, 2014–2016 General: 2009, nextOther issuesGovernorates Districts Municipalities Armed Forces Human rights Foreign relationsOther countries Atlasv t eParliamentary elections were held in
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-elect
An officer -elect refers to a person who has been elected to a position but has not yet been installed.[1][2] For example, a President
President
who has been elected but not yet installed would be referred to as a President -elect (e.g. President -elect of Ghana). Analogously, the term -designate (e.g. Prime Minister-designate) is used in systems without direct elections of executive politicians, such as in parliamentary systems, and for appointed officials who have not yet taken office. History[edit] This usage of the term -elect originated in the Catholic Church, where bishops were elected but would not take office until ordained. In addition, the winner of a papal election would be known as the pope -elect until he was confirmed and actually became pope.[3] The term entered politics with the practice of elective monarchy
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Nabih Berri
Nabih Berri
Nabih Berri
(Arabic: نبيه بري‎; born 28 January 1938[1]) is a Lebanese politician who has been the Speaker of the Parliament of Lebanon
Lebanon
since 1992. He heads the Amal Movement.[2][3][4]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Early career 3 Later political career 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesEarly life and education He was born in Bo, Sierra Leone
Bo, Sierra Leone
to Lebanese Shia parents on 28 January 1938.[1] Berri went to school in Tebnine
Tebnine
and Ain Ebel
Ain Ebel
in southern Lebanon, then continued his education in Bint Jbeil and Jaafariya supplementary schools in southern Lebanon
Lebanon
and later studied at the Makassed and the Ecole de la Sagesse in Beirut
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Lebanese Parliamentary Election, 2009
Fouad Siniora March 14Elected Prime Minister Saad Hariri March 14LebanonThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of LebanonConstitutionConstitution of 1926ExecutivePresidentList of presidents Incumbent: Michel AounPrime MinisterList of prime minister Incumbent: Saad HaririCabinetPast CabinetsLegislatureParliamentSpeakerNabih BerriCurrent membersPolitical partiesLebanese Forces Movement of the Future Kataeb Party Hezbollah Free Patriotic Movement Syrian Social Nationalist PartyElectionsPresidential: 2008, 2014–2016 General: 2009, nextOther issuesGovernorates Districts Municipalities Armed Forces Human rights Foreign relationsOther countries Atlasv t eParliamentary elections were held in
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List Of Political Parties In Lebanon
Lebanon
Lebanon
has numerous political parties, usually with sectarian character. Since 2005, and after the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafic Hariri, the political scene has become very polarized, with most major political parties and movements becoming part of one of two big rival alliances, the March 8 Alliance
March 8 Alliance
and the March 14 Alliance
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Movement Of The Future
Future Movement
Future Movement
(Arabic: تيار المستقبل, Tayyar Al-Mustaqbal) (FM) is Lebanese political movement, led by MP and Prime Minister Saad Hariri, the younger son of the assassinated former Prime Minister of Lebanon, Rafic Hariri.Saad HaririThe movement is the largest member of the March 14 Alliance, which won a majority of the seats in the 2009 parliamentary elections. The Party was officially founded in August 2007, yet it was only declared on April 5, 2009 in a convention held at the BIEL convention center in Beirut
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Hezbollah
Participant in the Lebanese Civil War, Israeli–Lebanese conflict, 2006 Lebanon
Lebanon
War, 2008 Lebanon Conflict
2008 Lebanon Conflict
and the Syrian Civil WarPrimary target in War on TerrorActive 1985 – present
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Free Patriotic Movement
The Free Patriotic Movement
Free Patriotic Movement
(FPM) (Arabic: التيار الوطني الحر‎, at-Tayyār al-Waṭanī al-Horr), also known as the Aounist party (Arabic: التيار العوني‎, at-Tayyār awne), is a Lebanese political party, led by Gebran Bassil. It is the second largest party in Lebanon's parliament (after the Future Movement) and the largest Christian party. It has 20 out of the 128 seats in parliament (of which 64 seats represent Christians). The FPM is the main party of the March 8 Alliance, which includes Amal (13 seats) and Hezbollah
Hezbollah
(12 seats), as well as seven other minor parliamentary parties (who between them have 16 seats). The FPM party promotes the rights of Lebanese expatriate and a relatively high minimum wage. The party's support base is overwhelmingly from Lebanon's Christian community, but includes a small number of Shia Muslims
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Elections In Lebanon
Elections in Lebanon
Lebanon
are allotted to occur every four years. Every citizen is allowed to vote, but the positions are constitutionally allocated by religious affiliation. In 2014, the Parliament failed to elect a president and extended its own term.Contents1 Parliamentary electoral system 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksParliamentary electoral system[edit] Lebanon's national legislature is called the Assembly of Representatives (Majlis An-Nouwab). Since the elections of 1992 (the first since the reforms of the Taif Agreement of 1989) removed the built-in majority previously enjoyed by Christians, the Parliament has had 128 seats and the term is four years. Seats in the Parliament are confessionally distributed but elected by universal suffrage. Each religious community has an allotted number of seats in the Parliament (see the table below)
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Next Lebanese General Election
Saad Hariri Future MovementLebanonThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of LebanonConstitutionConstitution of 1926ExecutivePresidentList of presidents Incumbent: Michel AounPrime MinisterList of prime minister Incumbent: Saad HaririCabinetPast CabinetsLegislatureParliamentSpeakerNabih BerriCurrent membersPolitical partiesLebanese Forces Movement of the Future Kataeb
Kataeb
Party Hezbollah Free Patriotic Movement Syrian Social Nationalist PartyElections


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List Of Cabinets Of Lebanon
The Council of Ministers of Lebanon, known informally as the Cabinet of Lebanon, is the chief executive body of the Republic of Lebanon.Contents1 July 2005 cabinet 2 July 2008 cabinet 3 November 2009 cabinet 4 June 2011 cabinet 5 February 2014 cabinet 6 December 2016 cabinet 7 ReferencesJuly 2005 cabinet[edit] Main article: Lebanese government of July 2005 The July 2005, Lebanese cabinet was formed by Fouad Siniora
Fouad Siniora
on 19 July 2005 who was appointed by then president Émile Lahoud. All the main political blocs were included in it except for the Free Patriotic Movement-led bloc headed by General
General
Michel Aoun
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Governorates Of Lebanon
Coordinates: 33°50′N 35°50′E / 33.833°N 35.833°E / 33.833; 35.833Lebanese Republic الجمهورية اللبنانية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-LubnānīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: كلّنا للوطن Kulluna lil-watan All Of Us, For the Country!Capital and largest city Beirut 33°54′N 35°32′E / 33.900°N 35.533°E / 33.900; 35.533Official languages Arabic[nb 1]Recognised languages FrenchDemonym LebaneseGovernment Unitary parliamentary multi-confessionalist republic[1]• PresidentMichel Aoun[2]• Prime MinisterSaad Hariri• Speaker of the ParliamentNabih BerriLegislature ParliamentEstablishment• Greater Lebanon1 September 1920• Constitution23 May 1926• Independence declared22 November 1943• Independence (Joined U
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Districts Of Lebanon
The 8 governorates of Lebanon
Lebanon
are subdivided into 26 districts (Aqdya, singular – qadaa)
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Municipalities Of Lebanon
The 26 districts of Lebanon
Lebanon
are subdivided into municipalities
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