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BP Pedestrian Bridge
The BP Pedestrian
Pedestrian
Bridge, or simply BP Bridge, is a girder footbridge in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, United States. It spans Columbus Drive to connect Maggie Daley Park
Maggie Daley Park
(formerly, Daley Bicentennial Plaza) with Millennium Park, both parts of the larger Grant Park
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Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
Michigan
is one of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes
Great Lakes
are shared by the U.S. and Canada. It is the second-largest of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
by volume[1] and the third-largest by surface area, after Lake Superior
Lake Superior
and Lake Huron
Lake Huron
(and is slightly smaller than the U.S. state
U.S. state
of West Virginia). To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron
Lake Huron
through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake.[4] Lake Michigan is shared, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan
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Pritzker Prize
The Pritzker Architecture
Architecture
Prize is awarded annually "to honor a living architect or architects whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture."[1] Founded in 1979 by Jay A. Pritzker and his wife Cindy, the award is funded by the Pritzker family and sponsored by the Hyatt
Hyatt
Foundation
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Randolph Street (Chicago)
Randolph Street is a street in Chicago. It runs east–west through the Chicago
Chicago
Loop, carrying westbound traffic west from Michigan Avenue across the Chicago
Chicago
River on the Randolph Street Bridge, interchanging with the Kennedy Expressway
Kennedy Expressway
(I-90/I-94), and continuing west. It serves as the northern boundary of Grant Park and the Chicago
Chicago
Landmark Historic Michigan Boulevard District
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Michigan Avenue (Chicago)
Michigan Avenue is a north-south street in Chicago
Chicago
which runs at 100 east on the Chicago
Chicago
grid. The northern end of the street is at Lake Shore Drive on the shore of Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
in the Gold Coast Historic District
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Accessibility
Accessibility
Accessibility
refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people who experience disabilities.[1] The concept of accessible design and practice of accessible development ensures both "direct access" (i.e. unassisted) and "indirect access" meaning compatibility with a person's assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). Accessibility
Accessibility
can be viewed as the "ability to access" and benefit from some system or entity
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Barrier Free
Universal design (close relation to inclusive design) refers to broad-spectrum ideas meant to produce buildings, products and environments that are inherently accessible to older people, people without disabilities, and people with disabilities. The term "universal design" was coined by the architect Ronald Mace to describe the concept of designing all products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible by everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life.[1] However, it was the work of Selwyn Goldsmith, author of Designing for the Disabled (1963), who really pioneered the concept of free access for people with disabilities
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Grade (slope)
The grade (also called slope, incline, gradient, mainfall, pitch or rise) of a physical feature, landform or constructed line refers to the tangent of the angle of that surface to the horizontal. It is a special case of the slope, where zero indicates horizontality. A larger number indicates higher or steeper degree of "tilt". Often slope is calculated as a ratio of "rise" to "run", or as a fraction ("rise over run") in which run is the horizontal distance and rise is the vertical distance. The grades or slopes of existing physical features such as canyons and hillsides, stream and river banks and beds are often described. Grades are typically specified for new linear constructions (such as roads, landscape grading, roof pitches, railroads, aqueducts, and pedestrian or bicycle circulation routes)
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Handrail
A handrail is a rail that is designed to be grasped by the hand so as to provide stability or support.[1] Handrails are commonly used while ascending or descending stairways and escalators in order to prevent injurious falls. Handrails are typically supported by posts or mounted directly to walls. Similar items not covered in this article include bathroom handrails—which help to prevent falls on slippery, wet floors—other grab bars, used, for instance, in ships' galleys, and barres, which serve as training aids for ballet dancers
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Box Girder
A box or tubular girder is a girder that forms an enclosed tube with multiple walls, rather than an I or H-beam. Originally constructed of riveted wrought iron, they are now found in rolled or welded steel, aluminium extrusions or prestressed concrete. Compared to an I-beam, the advantage of a box girder is that it better resists torsion. Having multiple vertical webs, it can also carry more load than an I-beam
I-beam
of equal height (although it will use more material than a taller I-beam
I-beam
of equivalent capacity). The distinction in naming between a box girder and a tubular girder is imprecise. Generally the term box girder is used, especially if it is rectangular in section
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Parking Garage
A multistorey car park[1][2] (UK English) or parking garage (US English;[1] also called a multistorey,[3] parkade (mainly Canadian), parking structure, parking ramp, parking building, parking deck or indoor parking) is a building designed for car parking and where there are a number of floors or levels on which parking takes place. It is essentially an indoor, stacked parking lot. Parking structures may be heated if they are enclosed. Design of parking structures can add considerable cost for planning new developments, and can be mandated by cities or states in new building parking requirements
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Noise Barrier
A noise barrier (also called a soundwall, noise wall, sound berm, sound barrier, or acoustical barrier) is an exterior structure designed to protect inhabitants of sensitive land use areas from noise pollution. Noise
Noise
barriers are the most effective method of mitigating roadway, railway, and industrial noise sources – other than cessation of the source activity or use of source controls. In the case of surface transportation noise, other methods of reducing the source noise intensity include encouraging the use of hybrid and electric vehicles, improving automobile aerodynamics and tire design, and choosing low-noise paving material
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Pedestrian Separation Structure
A pedestrian separation structure is any structure that removes pedestrians from a roadway, street or railway track. This creates a road junction where vehicles and pedestrians do not interact. This can be considered a type of grade separation structure on the road. These structures can be located either above the roadway or below the roadway. In the U.S., access under the Americans with Disabilities Act requirements means that stairs cannot be the only access to these structures. An elevator must be provided or a ramp built that conforms to the grade requirements under the ADA regulations. In the broadest sense, building codes that limit the number of driveways that cross sidewalks may be viewed as making the sidewalks a separation structure. In many areas, wildlife crossings are provided in wilderness areas to allow wildlife to cross roadways without risking accidents
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Aesthetics
Aesthetics
Aesthetics
(/ɛsˈθɛtɪks, iːs-/; also spelled esthetics) is a branch of philosophy that explores the nature of art, beauty, and taste, with the creation and appreciation of beauty.[1][2] In its more technical epistemological perspective, it is defined as the study of subjective and sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste.[3] Aesthetics
Aesthetics
studies how artists imagine, create and perform works of art; how people use, enjoy, and criticize art; and what happens in their minds when they look at paintings, listen to music, or read poetry, and understand what they see and hear. It also studies how they feel about art-- why they like some works and not others, and how art can affect their moods, beliefs, and attitude toward life
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Sheet Metal
Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is metal formed by an industrial process into thin, flat pieces. Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is one of the fundamental forms used in metalworking and it can be cut and bent into a variety of shapes. Countless everyday objects are fabricated from sheet metal. Thicknesses can vary significantly; extremely thin sheets are considered foil or leaf, and pieces thicker than 6 mm (0.25 in) are considered plate. Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is available in flat pieces or coiled strips. The coils are formed by running a continuous sheet of metal through a roll slitter. In most of the world, sheet metal thickness is consistently specified in millimeters. In the US, the thickness of sheet metal is commonly specified by a traditional, non-linear measure known as its gauge. The larger the gauge number, the thinner the metal. Commonly used steel sheet metal ranges from 30 gauge to about 7 gauge
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U.S. Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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