HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

B41 Nuclear Bomb
The B-41 (also known as Mk-41) was a thermonuclear weapon deployed by the United States
United States
Strategic Air Command
Strategic Air Command
in the early 1960s. It was the most powerful nuclear bomb ever developed by the United States, with a maximum yield of 25 megatons. The B-41 was the only three-stage thermonuclear weapon fielded by the U.S.[1]Contents1 Development 2 Composition 3 Physical characteristics 4 Service life 5 Efficiency 6 Effects 7 See also 8 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The development of the B-41 began in 1955 with a USAF
USAF
requirement for a Class B (high-yield, over 10,000 lb or 4,500 kg) weapon. It was based on the "Fagotti (bassoon)" test device first fired in the Redwing Zuni test of 27 May 1956
[...More...]

"B41 Nuclear Bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Museum Of The United States Air Force
The National Museum of the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(formerly the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
Museum)
[...More...]

"National Museum Of The United States Air Force" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear Fusion
In nuclear physics, nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two or more atomic nuclei come close enough to form one or more different atomic nuclei and subatomic particles (neutrons or protons). The difference in mass between the reactants and products is manifested as the release of large amounts of energy. This difference in mass arises due to the difference in atomic "binding energy" between the atomic nuclei before and after the reaction. Fusion is the process that powers active or "main sequence" stars, or other high magnitude stars. A fusion process that produces a nucleus lighter than iron-56 or nickel-62 will generally yield a net energy release. These elements have the smallest mass per nucleon and the largest binding energy per nucleon, respectively
[...More...]

"Nuclear Fusion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

1976 In Aviation
This is a list of aviation-related events from 1976:Contents1 Events1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 July 1.8 August 1.9 September 1.10 October 1.11 November 1.12 December2 First flights2.1 February 2.2 May 2.3 June 2.4 July 2.5 August 2.6 October 2.7 November 2.8 December3 Entered service3.1 January 3.2 June 3.3 August 3.4 November4 ReferencesEvents[edit] January[edit]January 1A bomb explodes in the forward cargo compartment of Middle East Airlines Flight 438, a Boeing 720-023B, at an altitude of 11,300 meters (37,100 feet) over Saudi Arabia
[...More...]

"1976 In Aviation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Groundburst
A ground burst is the detonation of an explosive device such as an artillery shell, nuclear weapon or air-dropped bomb that explodes upon hitting the ground. These weapons are set off by (fuses) that are activated when the weapon strikes the ground or something equally hard, such as a concrete building. Ground shock[edit] Ground shock, or water shock will result from nuclear explosions on (or near) the surface of ground or water. The ground shock can damage or destroy hardened structures. In water, the shock is damaging to nearby vessels and may also produce a surface wave to limited ranges. A crater is formed by an explosion at (or near) the ground surface. The size of the crater depends on the type of ground material and how close to the ground surface the explosion occurs. See also[edit]Air burstThis article related to weaponry is a stub
[...More...]

"Groundburst" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Air Burst
An air burst is the detonation of an explosive device such as an anti-personnel artillery shell or a nuclear weapon in the air instead of on contact with the ground or target or a delayed armor-piercing explosion. The principal military advantage of an air burst over a ground burst is that the energy from the explosion (as well as any shell fragments) is distributed more evenly over a wider area; however, the peak energy is lower at ground zero. The term may also refer to naturally occurring air bursts arising from the explosions of incoming meteors as happened in the Tunguska event, the 1930 Curuçá River event, and the Chelyabinsk meteor
Chelyabinsk meteor
event.Contents1 History1.1 Nuclear weapons2 Tactics 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]The airburst fuzing system on a modern Carl Gustav recoilless rifle High Explosive round Air
Air
burst artillery has a long history
[...More...]

"Air Burst" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

B-52 Stratofortress
The Boeing
Boeing
B-52 Stratofortress is an American long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bomber. The B-52 was designed and built by Boeing, which has continued to provide support and upgrades. It has been operated by the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(USAF) since the 1950s. The bomber is capable of carrying up to 70,000 pounds (32,000 kg) of weapons,[5] and has a typical combat range of more than 8,800 miles (14,080 km) without aerial refueling.[6] Beginning with the successful contract bid in June 1946, the B-52 design evolved from a straight wing aircraft powered by six turboprop engines to the final prototype YB-52 with eight turbojet engines and swept wings. The B-52 took its maiden flight in April 1952. Built to carry nuclear weapons for Cold War-era deterrence missions, the B-52 Stratofortress replaced the Convair B-36
[...More...]

"B-52 Stratofortress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uranium
Uranium
Uranium
is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92. It is a silvery-white metal in the actinide series of the periodic table. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium
Uranium
is weakly radioactive because all isotopes of uranium are unstable, with half-lives varying between 159,200 years and 4.5 billion years. The most common isotopes in natural uranium are uranium-238 (which has 146 neutrons and accounts for over 99%) and uranium-235 (which has 143 neutrons). Uranium
Uranium
has the highest atomic weight of the primordially occurring elements. Its density is about 70% higher than that of lead, and slightly lower than that of gold or tungsten
[...More...]

"Uranium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lithium Deuteride
Lithium
Lithium
hydride is an inorganic compound with the formula LiH. This alkali metal hydride is a colorless solid, although commercial samples are grey. Characteristic of a salt-like (ionic) hydride, it has a high melting point, and it is not soluble but reactive with all organic and protic solvents. It is soluble and nonreactive with certain molten salts such as lithium fluoride, lithium borohydride, and sodium hydride
[...More...]

"Lithium Deuteride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Highly Enriched Uranium
Enriched uranium
Enriched uranium
is a type of uranium in which the percent composition of uranium-235 has been increased through the process of isotope separation. Natural uranium is 99.284% 238U isotope, with 235U only constituting about 0.711% of its mass. 235U is the only nuclide existing in nature (in any appreciable amount) that is fissile with thermal neutrons.[1] Enriched uranium
Enriched uranium
is a critical component for both civil nuclear power generation and military nuclear weapons. The International Atomic Energy Agency attempts to monitor and control enriched uranium supplies and processes in its efforts to ensure nuclear power generation safety and curb nuclear weapons proliferation. During the Manhattan Project
Manhattan Project
enriched uranium was given the codename oralloy, a shortened version of Oak Ridge alloy, after the location of the plants where the uranium was enriched
[...More...]

"Highly Enriched Uranium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Natural Uranium
Natural uranium (NU, Unat[1]) refers to uranium with the same isotopic ratio as found in nature. It contains 0.711% uranium-235, 99.284% uranium-238, and a trace of uranium-234 by weight (0.0055%). In terms of the amount of radioactivity, approximately 2.2% comes from uranium-235, 48.6% uranium-238, and 49.2% uranium-234. Natural uranium can be used to fuel both low- and high-power nuclear reactors. Historically, graphite-moderated reactors and heavy water-moderated reactors have been fueled with natural uranium in the pure metal (U) or uranium dioxide (UO2) ceramic forms. However, experimental fuelings with uranium trioxide (UO3) and triuranium octaoxide, (U3O8) have shown promise.[2] The 0.72% uranium-235 is not sufficient to produce a self-sustaining critical chain reaction in light water reactors or nuclear weapons; these applications must use enriched uranium
[...More...]

"Natural Uranium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uranium-238
10 gram sample Complete table of nuclidesGeneralName, symbol Uranium-238, 238UNeutrons 146Protons 92Nuclide dataNatural abundance 99.2745%Half-life 4.468 billion yearsParent isotopes 242Pu (α) 238Pa (β−)Decay products 234ThIsotope mass 238.05078826 uSpin 0Decay mode Decay energyAlpha decay 4.267 MeV Uranium-238
Uranium-238
(238U or U-238) is the most common isotope of uranium found in nature, with a relative abundance of 99%. Unlike uranium-235, it is non-fissile, which means it cannot sustain a chain reaction. However, it is fissionable by fast neutrons, and is fertile, meaning it can be transmuted to fissile plutonium-239. 238U cannot support a chain reaction because inelastic scattering reduces neutron energy below the range where fast fission of one or more next-generation nuclei is probable
[...More...]

"Uranium-238" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Laydown
Laydown delivery is a mode of attack using a freefall nuclear weapon: the bomb's descent to the target is slowed by ribbon parachute so that it actually lands on the ground before detonating.[1] Laydown delivery requires the weapon's case to be reinforced so that it can survive the force of impact and generally involves a time-delay fuze to trigger detonation e.g. 45 seconds after hitting the ground. Laydown mode can be used to increase the effect of the weapon's blast on built-up targets such as submarine pens or to transmit a shock wave through the ground to attack deeply-buried targets. An attack of this type produces large amounts of radioactive fallout. It has the additional advantage of allowing the carrier aircraft to fly very low and still escape from ground zero without being damaged or destroyed by effects of the nuclear explosion. That is particularly important for high-yield nuclear weapons such as the B83 and B53 nuclear bombs
[...More...]

"Laydown" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lithium
Lithium
Lithium
(from Greek: λίθος, translit. lithos, lit. 'stone') is a chemical element with symbol Li and atomic number 3. It is a soft, silvery-white alkali metal. Under standard conditions, it is the lightest metal and the lightest solid element. Like all alkali metals, lithium is highly reactive and flammable, and is stored in mineral oil. When cut open, it exhibits a metallic luster, but moist air corrodes it quickly to a dull silvery gray, then black tarnish. It never occurs freely in nature, but only in (usually ionic) compounds, such as pegmatitic minerals which were once the main source of lithium
[...More...]

"Lithium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strategic Air Command
Strategic Air Command
Strategic Air Command
(SAC) was both a Department of Defense Specified Command and a United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(USAF) Major Command (MAJCOM), responsible for Cold War
Cold War
command and control of two of the three components of the U.S
[...More...]

"Strategic Air Command" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deuterium
Deuterium Complete table of nuclidesGeneralName, symbol Hydrogen-2, 2H or DNeutrons 1Protons 1 Nuclide
Nuclide
dataNatural abundance 0.015% (Earth)Isotope mass 2.01410178 uSpin 1+Excess energy 13135.720± 0.001 keVBinding energy 2224.52± 0.20 keV Deuterium
Deuterium
(or hydrogen-2, symbol D or 2H, also known as heavy hydrogen) is one of two stable isotopes of hydrogen (the other being protium, or hydrogen-1). The nucleus of deuterium, called a deuteron, contains one proton and one neutron, whereas the far more common protium has no neutron in the nucleus. Deuterium
Deuterium
has a natural abundance in Earth's oceans of about one atom in 7003642000000000000♠6420 of hydrogen. Thus deuterium accounts for approximately 0.0156% (or, on a mass basis, 0.0312%) of all the naturally occurring hydrogen in the oceans, while protium accounts for more than 99.98%
[...More...]

"Deuterium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.