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Břeclav
Břeclav
Břeclav
(Czech pronunciation: [ˈbr̝ɛtslaf]; German: Lundenburg; Hungarian: Leventevár) is a town in the Moravia, South Moravian Region, Czech Republic, approximately 55 km southeast of Brno. It is located at the border with Lower Austria
Lower Austria
on the Dyje
Dyje
River. The nearest town on Austrian territory is Bernhardsthal. Břeclav
Břeclav
also lies 10 km northwest of the Slovak border at Kúty
Kúty
and 100 km north of the Austrian capital city Vienna.Contents1 History1.1 Pohansko 1.2 Břeclav
Břeclav
Castle 1.3 Town2 Transport 3 Geography and climate 4 Sights 5 Gallery 6 International relations6.1 Twin towns — Sister cities7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Pohansko[edit] In the area of the town several localities have been discovered which were settled in prehistory
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Czech Republic
The Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(/ˈtʃɛk rɪˈpʌblɪk/ ( listen)[10] Czech: Česká republika, Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛskaː ˈrɛpuˌblɪka] ( listen)),[11] also known as Czechia[12] (/ˈtʃɛkiə/ ( listen); Czech: Česko, pronounced [ˈtʃɛsko] ( listen)), is a landlocked country in Central Europe
Europe
bordered by Germany
Germany
to the west, Austria
Austria
to the south, Slovakia to the east and Poland
Poland
to the northeast.[13] The Czech Republic
Czech Republic
covers an area of 78,866 square kilometres (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental climate and oceanic climate. It is a unitary parliamentary republic, has 10.6 million inhabitants and the capital and largest city is Prague, with 1.3 million residents
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Munich Agreement
The Munich
Munich
Agreement was a settlement permitting Nazi Germany's annexation of portions of Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
along the country's borders mainly inhabited by German speakers, for which a new territorial designation, the "Sudetenland", was coined. The agreement was signed in the early hours of 30 September 1938 (but dated 29 September) after being negotiated at a conference held in Munich, Germany, among the major powers of Europe, excluding the Soviet Union. Today, it is widely regarded as a failed act of appeasement toward Germany. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the future of the Sudetenland in the face of demands made by Adolf Hitler. The agreement was signed by Germany, France, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Italy
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Bretislaus I Of Bohemia
Bretislav I
Bretislav I
(Czech: Břetislav I.; 1002/1005–10 January 1055), known as the "Bohemian Achilles", of the Přemyslid
Přemyslid
dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 1035 until his death.Contents1 Youth 2 Raid into Poland 3 Domestic policy 4 Family 5 Legacy 6 Notes 7 Sources 8 External linksYouth[edit] Bretislav was the son of Duke Oldřich[1] and his low-born concubine Božena. As an illegitimate son could not obtain a desirable wife by conventional means, he chose to kidnap his future wife Judith of Schweinfurt
Schweinfurt
(Czech: Jitka), a daughter of the Bavarian noble Henry of Schweinfurt, Margrave of Nordgau, in 1019 at Schweinfurt. During his father’s reign, in 1019 or 1029,[2] Bretislav took back Moravia
Moravia
from Poland. About 1031, he invaded Hungary
Hungary
in order to prevent its expansion under king Stephen
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Manor House
A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry. They were sometimes fortified, but this was frequently intended more for show than for defence. Manor
Manor
houses existed in most European countries where feudalism existed, where they were sometimes known as castles, palaces, and so on
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House Of Zierotin
The House of Žerotín or House of Zierotin
Zierotin
was a Czech noble family in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, one of the oldest and most illustrious noble families from Bohemia
Bohemia
and Moravia. The family was first mentioned around the year 1200 as Bludovici (Blud of Bludov), later renamed Žerotínové, and achieved the rank of Imperial Counts in the Holy Roman Empire. The male line of this family died out in 1985. Its estates, manor Bludov, were returned to their female descendants, the family Mornstein- Zierotin
Zierotin
after fall of Communist rule in 1989. History[edit] According to romantic legend, the Zierotins were the offspring of Prince Oleg of Drelinia, brother of Vladimir I of Kiev, and therefore the family uses in its coat of arms a royal crown (or more properly the crown of Grand Prince) and princely mantling
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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House Of Liechtenstein
The House of Liechtenstein, from which the principality takes its name, is the family which reigns by constitutional, hereditary right over the nation of Liechtenstein. Only dynastic members of the family are eligible to inherit the throne. The dynasty's membership, rights and responsibilities are defined by a law of the family, which is enforced by the reigning Prince and may be altered by vote among the family's dynasts, but which may not be altered by the Government or Parliament of Liechtenstein.[1]Contents1 History 2 21st-century princely family (closest members) 3 Tree list 4 Palaces and residences 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The family comes from Castle Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
in Lower Austria, which the family possessed from at least 1140 to the 13th century, and from 1807 onwards. Heinrich I. von Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
(d
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Artificial Ruins
Artificial ruins
Artificial ruins
or imitation ruins are edifice fragments built to resemble real remnants of historic buildings. Artificial ruins
Artificial ruins
became fashionable in German interpretations of baroque and English gardens, like the Ruinenberg. The ruins are mostly of Gothic or ancient style. See also[edit]FollyThis article about a German building or structure is a stub
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Market Town
Market town
Market town
or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. A town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.Contents1 Brief history 2 Czech Republic 3 German-language area 4 Hungary 5 Norway 6 United Kingdom and Ireland6.1 England
England
and Wales 6.2 Ireland 6.3 Scotland7 In art and literature 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBrief history[edit] The primary purpose of a market town is the provision of goods and services to the surrounding locality.[1] Although market towns were known in antiquity, their number increased rapidly from the 12th century
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Okres
Okres (Czech and Slovak term meaning "district" in English; from German Kreis - circle (or perimeter)) refers to administrative entities in the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
and Slovakia. It is similar to Landkreis in Germany or Okrug in Slavic speaking countries. The first districts in the Czech lands developed from domains in 1850 by the decision of the Imperial government of Austria. In the territory of present day Slovakia
Slovakia
their predecessors were districts of the counties of the Kingdom of Hungary (slúžnovský okres in Slovak). The organisation and functions of the districts were different in the Czech lands and Hungary. After the creation of Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
districts became an administrative unit of the new state with a unified status
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Treaty Of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (1919)
The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye was signed on 10 September 1919 by the victorious Allies of World War I
Allies of World War I
on the one hand and by the Republic of German- Austria
Austria
on the other
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End Of World War II In Europe
The final battles of the European Theatre of World War II
World War II
as well as the German surrender to the Allies took place in late April and early May 1945.Contents1 Timeline of surrenders and deaths 2 See also 3 Citations 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksTimeline of surrenders and deaths[edit] Main article: Timeline of Axis surrenders in World War II Allied forces begin to take large numbers of Axis prisoners: The total number of prisoners taken on the Western Front in April 1945 by the Western Allies was 1,500,000.[1] April also witnessed the capture of at least 120,000 German troop
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Regions Of The Czech Republic
According to the Act no. 129/2000 Coll. (Law on Regions) on higher-level territorial self-governing units (vyšší územní samosprávné celky), which implements the Chapter VII of the Czech Constitution, the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
is divided in thirteen regions (kraje) and one capital city (hlavní město) with regional status as of 1 January 2000
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Czechs
Mostly Irreligion[13] Historically Christian Roman Catholic, Hussite, Lutheran and other Moravians, Slovaks, Silesians, Sorbs, Germans[14], Austrians[14], Bavarians, Poles
Poles
& other West SlavsThe Czechs
Czechs
(Czech: Češi, pronounced [ˈtʃɛʃɪ]; singular masculine: Čech [ˈtʃɛx], singular feminine: Češka [ˈtʃɛʃka]) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history and are native speakers of the Czech language. Ethnic Czechs
Czechs
were called Bohemians in English until the early 20th century, referring to the medieval land of Bohemia
Bohemia
which in turn was adapted from late Iron Age
Iron Age
tribe of Celtic Boii
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