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Bön In Tibet
Bon, also spelled Bön[2] (Tibetan: བོན་, Wylie: bon, Lhasa dialect IPA: pʰø̃̀), is a Tibetan religion, which self-identifies as distinct from Tibetan Buddhism, although it shares the same overall teachings and terminology
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Bon (other)
BON, Bon, or bon may refer to:Look up bon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Places:Cap Bon, a peninsula in Tunisia Flamingo International Airport, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (IATA code BON) North Station, Boston (Amtrak station code BON) Bon, Iran (other), places in IranPeople: Bon
Bon
(surname)Religion: Bon
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Zhang-Zhung Language
Zhang-Zhung (Tibetan: ཞང་ཞུང, Wylie: zhang zhung) is an extinct Sino-Tibetan language that was spoken in what is now western Tibet
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Tertön
Tertön
Tertön
(Tibetan: གཏེར་སྟོན་, Wylie: gter ston)[1] is a term within Tibetan Buddhism. It means a person who is a discoverer of ancient hidden texts or terma. Many tertöns are considered to be incarnations of the twenty five main disciples of Padmasambhava. A vast system of transmission lineages developed. Nyingma
Nyingma
scriptures were updated by terma discoveries, and terma teachings have guided many Buddhist and Bon
Bon
practitioners.Contents1 Prominent tertöns1.1 The Five Tertön
Tertön
Kings 1.2 The Eight Great Lingpas2 Tertön
Tertön
practices 3 References 4 External linksProminent tertöns[edit] According to generally accepted history, the rediscovering of terma began with the first tertön, Sangye Lama
Lama
(1000–1080)
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Axis Mundi
The axis mundi (also cosmic axis, world axis, world pillar, center of the world, world tree), in certain beliefs and philosophies, is the world center, or the connection between Heaven
Heaven
and Earth. As the celestial pole and geographic pole, it expresses a point of connection between sky and earth where the four compass directions meet. At this point travel and correspondence is made between higher and lower realms.[1] Communication from lower realms may ascend to higher ones and blessings from higher realms may descend to lower ones and be disseminated to all.[2] The spot functions as the omphalos (navel), the world's point of beginning.[3][4][5] The image relates to the center of the earth (perhaps like an umbilical providing nourishment)[citation needed]
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Sauwastika
The term sauwastika (or sauvastika[1][2]) (as a character: 卍, 卐) is sometimes used to distinguish the left-facing from the right-facing swastika symbol, a meaning which developed in 19th century scholarship.[3] The left-facing variant is favoured in Bön
Bön
and Gurung Dharma; it is called yungdrung in Bon and Gurung Yantra in Gurung Dharma
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Mount Kailash
Mount Kailash
Kailash
(also Mount Kailasa; Kangrinboqê or Gang Rinpoche (Tibetan: གངས་རིན་པོ་ཆེ; Chinese: 冈仁波齐峰 (simplified); Chinese: 岡仁波齊峰 (traditional)), is a peak in the Kailash
Kailash
Range (Gangdisê Mountains), which forms part of Transhimalaya
Transhimalaya
in the Tibet Autonomous Region
Tibet Autonomous Region
of China. The mountain is located near Lake Manasarovar
Lake Manasarovar
and Lake Rakshastal, close to the source of some of the longest Asian rivers: the Indus, Sutlej, Brahmaputra, and Karnali also known as Ghaghara
Ghaghara
(a tributary of the Ganges) in India
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9 (number)
9 (nine /naɪn/) is the natural number following 8 and preceding 10. Nine is the highest one-digit number in a system of numbers using base 10.Contents1 Mathematics1.1 Numeral systems 1.2 Probability2 List of basic calculations 3 Evolution of the glyph 4 Alphabets and codes 5 Commerce 6 Culture and mythology6.1 Indian culture 6.2 Chinese culture 6.3 Ancient Egypt 6.4 European culture 6.5 Greek mythology 6.6 Mesoamerican mythology 6.7 Aztec mythology 6.8 Mayan mythology7 Anthropology7.1 Idioms 7.2 Society 7.3 Technique8 Literature 9 Organizations 10 Places and thoroughfares 11 Religion and philosophy 12 Science12.1 Astronomy 12.2 Chemistry 12.3 Physiology13 Sports 14 Technology 15 Music 16 See also 17 References 18 Further readingMathematics[edit] 9 is a composite number, its proper divisors being 1 and 3. It is 3 times 3 and hence the third square number
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Kongpo
Kongpo (Tibetan: ཀོང་པོ་, Wylie: kong po) is a region in Gongbo'gyamda County, Nyingchi Prefecture. It is situated on the Nyang River, a northern tributary of the Yarlung Tsangpo River. Kongpo Drula Gonpa is the oldest and largest monastery in the region, founded by KhenChen Dawa Sangpo in 14th centurie. Kongpo Drula KhenChen is the highest Lama of Kongpo tribe. Kongpo was an area of southeastern Tibet
Tibet
in the premodern period. Tsagong was one of the holy places of Kongpo and still is. Thang Tong Gyalpo, a famous architect and yogi, founded Manmogang Monastery, where the original Samding Dorje Phagmo
Samding Dorje Phagmo
died
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Sutra
A sutra (/ˈsuːtrə/; IAST: sūtra) is an aphorism or other teaching that is part of the ancient religious traditions originating in India, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.[1][2][3] The term sutra can broadly refer to a single aphorism, a collection of aphorisms in the form of a manual or even a condensed manual or text.[2] Sutras are considered a genre of ancient and medieval Indian texts.[3] In Hinduism, sutras are a distinct type of literary composition, a compilation of short aphoristic statements.[3][4] Each sutra is any short rule, like a theorem distilled into few words or syllables, around which teachings of ritual, philosophy, grammar, or any field of knowledge can be woven.[2][3] The oldest sutras of Hinduism
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Tantra
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Dzungar People
The name Dzungar people, also written as Zunghar (literally züüngar, from the Mongolian for "left hand"), referred to the several Oirat tribes who formed and maintained the Dzungar Khanate
Dzungar Khanate
in the 17th and 18th centuries. Historically they were one of major tribes of the Four Oirat confederation. They were also known as the Eleuths or Ööled, from the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
euphemism for the hated word "Dzungar",[1] and also called "Kalmyks"
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Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Dalai Lama
Dalai Lama
Lama
/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/ (US); /ˌdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/ (UK)[1][2] (Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la'i bla ma [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given to spiritual leaders of the Tibetan people
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