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Béchar District
Béchar
Béchar
(Arabic: بشار‎) is the capital city of Béchar
Béchar
Province, Algeria. It is also a commune, coextensive with Béchar
Béchar
District, of Béchar
Béchar
Province. In 2008 the city had a population of 165,627,[2] up from 134,954 in 1998,[3] with an annual growth rate of 2.1%.[2] The commune covers an area of 5,050 square kilometres (1,950 sq mi).[1] Before coal was found here in 1907, Béchar
Béchar
was a small populated town like many others in the region. It thrived on the activity of the coal mines until petroleum production seized the market.[4] Leatherwork and jewellery are notable products of Béchar. Dates, vegetables, figs, cereals and almonds are produced near Béchar
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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Danish Meteorological Institute
The Danish Meteorological
Meteorological
Institute (Danish: Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut) is the official Danish meteorological institute, administrated by the Ministry of Energy, Utilities and Climate. The institute makes weather forecasts and observations for Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroe Islands.Contents1 History 2 Equipment 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] It was founded in 1873, largely through the efforts of Ludwig A. Colding. The Danish Meteorological
Meteorological
Institute – DMI – encompasses the combined knowledge of the former Meteorological
Meteorological
Institute, the Meteorological
Meteorological
Service for Civil Aviation and the Meteorological Service for Defence. The Meteorological
Meteorological
Institute was founded in 1872 under the Ministry of the Navy
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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French Foreign Legion
Foreign Legion Command Mainland France1st Foreign RegimentForeign Legion Pionniers4th Foreign Regiment Foreign Legion Recruiting Group 1st Foreign Cavalry Regiment 1st Foreign Engineer Regiment 2nd Foreign Infantry
Infantry
Regiment 2nd Foreign Engineer Regiment 13th Demi- Brigade
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Kenadsa Longwave Transmitter
The Kenadsa longwave transmitter is a longwave transmitter of the Algerian Broadcasting Company situated at Kénadsa near Béchar, which transmits the program of Chaine 1 with a power of 2000 kW on 153 kHz. Kenadsa longwave transmitter, among the most powerful broadcasting transmitters in the world, uses an antenna array of three 357-meter tall guyed masts, which are arranged in a line. In spite of its high power, and unlike the Tipaza Longwave Transmitter, Kenadsa broadcasts are difficult to receive in Europe. This occurs because its frequency is also used by powerful European broadcasting stations and as a result of signal attenuation caused by poor ground conductivity of the Sahara sand
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Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
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Desert Pavement
A desert pavement, also called reg (in the western Sahara), serir (eastern Sahara), gibber (in Australia), or saï (central Asia)[1] is a desert surface covered with closely packed, interlocking angular or rounded rock fragments of pebble and cobble size. They typically top alluvial fans.[2] Desert varnish
Desert varnish
collects on the exposed surface rocks over time. Geologists debate the mechanics of pavement formation and their age.Contents1 Formation 2 Local names 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksFormation[edit] Several theories have been proposed for the formation of desert pavements.[3] A common theory suggests they form through the gradual removal of sand, dust and other fine-grained material by the wind and intermittent rain, leaving the larger fragments behind
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Hot Desert Climate
The Desert
Desert
climate (in the Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
BWh and BWk, sometimes also BWn), also known as an arid climate, is a climate in which precipitation is too low to sustain any vegetation at all, or at most a very scanty shrub,[citation needed] and does not meet the criteria to be classified as a polar climate. An area that features this climate usually experiences from 25 to 200 mm (7.87 inches) per year of precipitation[1] and in some years may experience no precipitation at all. Averages may be even less such as in Arica, Chile, where precipitation normals annually stand at around 1 mm per year
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Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
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Relative Humidity
Relative humidity
Relative humidity
(RH) is the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapor to the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at a given temperature. Relative humidity
Relative humidity
depends on temperature and the pressure of the system of interest
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Sunshine Duration
Sunshine
Sunshine
duration or sunshine hours is a climatological indicator, measuring duration of sunshine in given period (usually, a day or a year) for a given location on Earth, typically expressed as an averaged value over several years. It is a general indicator of cloudiness of a location, and thus differs from insolation, which measures the total energy delivered by sunlight over a given period. Sunshine
Sunshine
duration is usually expressed in hours per year, or in (average) hours per day. The first measure indicates the general sunniness of a location compared with other places, while the latter allows for comparison of sunshine in various seasons in the same location.[1] Another often-used measure is percentage ratio of recorded bright sunshine duration and daylight duration in the observed period. An important use of sunshine duration data is to characterize the climate of sites, especially of health resorts
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World Meteorological Organization
The World Meteorological Organization
World Meteorological Organization
(WMO) is an intergovernmental organization with a membership of 191 Member States and Territories. It originated from the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), which was founded in 1873
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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Oil
An oil is any nonpolar chemical substance that is a viscous liquid at ambient temperatures and is both hydrophobic (immiscible with water, literally "water fearing") and lipophilic (miscible with other oils, literally "fat loving"). Oils have a high carbon and hydrogen content and are usually flammable and surface active. The general definition of oil includes classes of chemical compounds that may be otherwise unrelated in structure, properties, and uses. Oils may be animal, vegetable, or petrochemical in origin, and may be volatile or non-volatile.[1] They are used for food (e.g., olive oil), fuel (e.g., heating oil), medical purposes (e.g., mineral oil), lubrication (e.g. motor oil), and the manufacture of many types of paints, plastics, and other materials
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Arable Land
Arable land
Arable land
(from Latin arabilis, "able to be plowed") is, according to one definition, land capable of being ploughed and used to grow crops.[1] In Britain, it was traditionally contrasted with pasturable land such as heaths which could be used for sheep-rearing but not farmland. A quite different kind of definition is used by various agencies concerned with agriculture. In providing statistics on arable land, the FAO
FAO
and the World
World
Bank[2] use the definition offered in the glossary accompanying FAOSTAT: " Arable land
Arable land
is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category
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