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B'nai Jeshurun (Manhattan)
89000474 [1]Added to NRHP June 2, 1989Front doorB'nai Jeshurun is a synagogue in the Upper West Side
Upper West Side
of Manhattan, New York City.Contents1 History1.1 Breakaway congregations 1.2 Affiliation 1.3 Contemporary2 Notable clergy 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1825, Bnai Jeshurun was the second synagogue founded in New York and the third-oldest Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
synagogue in the United States.[2] The synagogue was founded by a coalition of young members of congregation Shearith Israel
Shearith Israel
and immigrants and the descendants of immigrants from the German and Polish lands. It was the stated intention to follow the "German and Polish minhag (rite)."[3] The order of prayers followed that of the Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
Great Synagogue of London and sought the guidance of the British chief Rabbi Solomon Hirschell on matters of ritual
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Newspapers.com
Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com
LLC is a privately held online company based in Lehi, Utah, United States. The largest for-profit genealogy company in the world, it operates a network of genealogical, historical record and genetic genealogy websites. As of June 2014, the company claims to provide access to approximately 16 billion historical records, and have over 2 million paying subscribers and, as of February 2018, more than seven million AncestryDNA customers.[5][6][non-primary source needed] The company also claims that its user-generated content tallies to more than 70 million family trees, and that subscribers have added more than 200 million photographs, scanned documents, and written stories.[7][non-primary source needed] Under its subsidiaries, Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com
operates foreign sites that provide access to services and records specific to other countries in the languages of those countries
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Union Of American Hebrew Congregations
The Union for Reform Judaism
Reform Judaism
(until 2003: Union of American Hebrew Congregations), is the congregational arm of Reform Judaism
Reform Judaism
in North America, founded in 1873 by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise. It is served by the Central Conference of American Rabbis. The current president is Rabbi Richard Jacobs. The URJ has an estimated constituency of some 880,000 registered adults in 873 congregations. It claims to represent 2.2 million, as over a third of adult U.S. Jews, including many who are not synagogue members, state affinity with Reform, making it the largest denomination among them
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Jewish Theological Seminary Of America
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
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Siddur
A siddur (Hebrew: סדור‎ [siˈduʁ]; plural siddurim סדורים, [siduˈʁim]) is a Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
book, containing a set order of daily prayers
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United Synagogue Of Conservative Judaism
The United Synagogue
United Synagogue
of Conservative Judaism
Conservative Judaism
(USCJ) is the largest network of Conservative Jewish congregations in the world, united by a shared purpose to inspire current and future generations of Jews to seek meaning, find connection, and experience wholeness in a world that is complex and ever evolving. USCJ closely works with the Rabbinical Assembly, the international body of Conservative rabbis, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies.[6] USCJ works to strengthen Jewish communities inside and outside the walls of a synagogue. It functions as the network that ensures there are thriving centers of Jewish practice throughout North America, Israel, and beyond that celebrate both tradition and contemporary life
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Seder
The Passover
Passover
Seder /ˈseɪdər/ (Hebrew: סֵדֶר‬ [ˈsedeʁ] 'order, arrangement'; Yiddish: סדר‎ seyder) is a Jewish ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
of Passover. It is conducted throughout the world on the evening of the 15th day of Nisan
Nisan
in the Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
(with a calendar day reckoned to start at sunset). The day falls in late March or in April of the Gregorian calendar and the Passover
Passover
lasts for 7 days in Israel
Israel
and 8 days outside Israel. Jews
Jews
generally observe one or two seders: in Israel, one seder is observed on the first night of Passover; many Diaspora communities hold a seder also on the second night
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Stephen Samuel Wise
Stephen Samuel Wise
Stephen Samuel Wise
(born Weisz, March 17, 1874 – April 19, 1949) was an American Reform rabbi and Zionist leader.Contents1 Early life1.1 Education2 Career and activism2.1 Friendship with Einstein 2.2 Public and charitable offices 2.3 Publications3 Personal life and death 4 Criticism of Wise 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Wise was born in Budapest
Budapest
in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the son and grandson of rabbis. His grandfather, Joseph Hirsch Weiss, was Chief Rabbi
Rabbi
of a small town near Budapest. His father, Aaron Wise, earned a PhD and ordination in Europe, and emigrated to the United States to serve as rabbi of Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes
Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes
in Brooklyn, New York. Wise's maternal grandfather, Móric Fischer de Farkasházy, created the Herend Porcelain Company
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Israel Goldstein
Israel Goldstein (June 18, 1896 – 1986) was an American-born Israeli rabbi, author and Zionist leader. He was one of the leading founders of Brandeis University.[1][2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career and Zionist activity 3 Death 4 Published works 5 Honors and commemoration 6 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Goldstein, born in Philadelphia, was a noteworthy graduate of South Philadelphia High School (SPHS)[3] in 1911
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National Park Service
The National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.[1] It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service
National Park Service
Organic Act[2] and is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior
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Memphis Daily Appeal
The Commercial Appeal (also known as the Memphis Commercial Appeal) is a daily newspaper of Memphis, Tennessee, and its surrounding metropolitan area. It is owned by the Gannett Company; its former owner, The E.W. Scripps Company, also owned the former afternoon paper, the Memphis Press-Scimitar, which it folded in 1983. The 2016 purchase by Gannett of Journal Media Group (Scripps' direct successor) effectively gave it control of the two major papers in western and central Tennessee, uniting the Commercial Appeal with Nashville's The Tennessean. The Commercial Appeal is a seven-day morning paper. It is distributed primarily in Greater Memphis, including Shelby, Fayette, and Tipton counties in Tennessee; DeSoto, Tate, and Tunica counties in Mississippi; and in Crittenden County in Arkansas
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Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
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English Jews
The history of the Jews in England goes back to the reign of William the Conqueror. The first written record of Jewish settlement in England dates from 1070. The Jewish settlement continued until King Edward I's Edict of Expulsion in 1290. After the expulsion, there was no Jewish community, apart from individuals who practised Judaism secretly, until the rule of Oliver Cromwell. While Cromwell never officially readmitted Jews to the Commonwealth of England, a small colony of Sephardic Jews living in London was identified in 1656 and allowed to remain. The Jewish Naturalisation Act of 1753, an attempt to legalise the Jewish presence in England ["Scotland was under the jurisdiction of the Jew Bill, enacted in 1753, but repealed the next year"], remained in force for only a few months. Historians commonly date Jewish Emancipation to either 1829 or 1858, though Benjamin Disraeli, born Jewish but converted to Anglicanism, had been elected to Parliament in 1837
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New York Herald
The New York Herald
New York Herald
was a large-distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835, and 1924.Contents1 History1.1 Evening Telegram2 Commemorated 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]"The New York Herald," December 8, 1862The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845, it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States.[1] In 1861, it circulated 84,000 copies and called itself "the most largely circulated journal in the world." [2] Bennett stated that the function of a newspaper "is not to instruct but to startle and amuse."[3][4] His politics tended to be anti-Catholic and he had tended to favor the Know-Nothing
Know-Nothing
faction, though he was not particularly anti-immigrant as the Know-Nothing party were
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New York Post
The New York Post
New York Post
is an American daily newspaper that is primarily distributed in New York City
New York City
and its surrounding area. It is the 13th-oldest newspaper in the United States, and it had the sixth-highest circulation in 2009.[2] Established in 1801 by federalist and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, it became a respected broadsheet in the 19th century, under the name New York Evening Post. The modern version of the paper is published in tabloid format. In 1976, Rupert Murdoch
Rupert Murdoch
bought the Post for US$30.5 million.[3] Since 1993, Post has been owned by News Corporation and its successor, News Corp, which had owned it previously from 1976 to 1988
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